Amherst Magazine

Verbatim

“Most of the rest of the world—not all of it, but most of the rest of the world—wants the United States to be a leader. They do not want us to be a boss.”

Former Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott P’98, ’02, the John J. McCloy ’16 Professor of American Institutions and International Relations at Amherst and president of the Brookings Institution
In this year’s McCloy Lecture
Cole Assembly Room, April 19, 2007

“One of the findings we’ve encountered at Harvard—and I bet you Amherst is not that different—is that, for many students, the biggest project you had before getting into college was getting into college.”

Howard Gardner, MacArthur fellow and education expert
In a speech titled “What Does College Have to Do with Meaningful Work in a Meaningful Life?”
Cole Assembly Room, March 29, 2007

“The contradiction between ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident’ and the fact of slavery is the original sin of the founding of the American republic.”

Historian Simon Schama
In a talk on the abolition of the slave trade
Pruyne Lecture Hall, April 25, 2007

“These societies—not only their language and their culture, but their people—are gradually being extinguished.”

Vice Admiral Richard Carmona, former U.S. surgeon general
Speaking on the health crises disproportionately facing Native Americans
Cole Assembly Room, April 1, 2007

“The idea that chance, over billions of years, could lead to our universe, our galaxy, our Earth, its life-forms, the human species and especially the human brain—these phenomena are, themselves, breathtaking.”

Harold Varmus ’61, 1989 Nobel laureate in medicine
In a talk on 21st-century science
Pruyne Lecture Hall, April 16, 2007

“After a while you stop thinking about [community outreach] as service or an activity, and you start thinking of it just as a part of who you are.”

Priyanka Jacob ’07
One of the recipients of the new Student Community Engagement Leadership Awards
Lewis-Sebring Commons
April 11, 2007

Online Extra: Listen to some of these talks through iTunes or at www.amherst.edu/multimedia.