Amherst Magazine

Verbatim

Overheard on Campus

“They did make me turn in a thesis of 15 million pages written in 75 languages, but I was lucky enough that other people wrote it for me.”

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on what he had to do to get an honorary degree from Amherst. He spoke in Cole Assembly Room on May 22.

“When are they going to quit worrying about the Daily Planet?”

Jim Kennedy ’75, the Associated Press executive in charge of finding a paid business model to save the AP, speaking in Stirn Auditorium on May 28 on the need to find new ways to deliver the news. His talk was part of a Reunion panel about how the Internet has shaken business models in music and journalism.

“When the flood in Nashville happens, I can go into my studio, which is in my laptop, and I can write a song with my four friends ... [and record it and sell it online] for $1.99 and send most of that profit to the Red Cross.”

Folk singer Amy Speace ’90, at the same panel

“Before I get started with my speech I’d just like to thank Baby Gap for outfitting me for today’s assembly.”

Zachary Cherry ’10, wearing a too-small cap and gown for his May 7 Senior Assembly speech

“You are the bravest people I know, Class of 2010, and I love you for that.”

Robyn Bahr ’10, also speaking at Senior Assembly on May 7

“Government in the U.S. is actually spending more on health care than Canada. Right now.”

Jessica Wolpaw Reyes ’94, associate professor of economics, in a May talk on health care reform, delivered via conference call for the college’s Telephone Lecture Series. Walter E. Nicholson, Ward H. Patton Professor of Economics, was the other lecturer.

“If you're going to put a roast chicken [recipe] in a book and you're going to get people to say, ‘Okay, drop all your roast chicken recipes and make mine,’ it's got to kill, it's got to work.”

Ted Lee ’93, author, with his brother Matt, of the new cookbook Simple Fresh Southern, in an audio interview with Jenny Rosenstrach ’93 for Amherst Reads, Amherst magazine’s online book club