Amherst Magazine

Amherst Magazine: Spring 2013

FEATUREs

The Answer is Always Another Question
By Eric Goldscheider
If there’s a common theme running through the work of this year’s senior thesis writers, it is this: in our digitally connected age, hard-and-fast answers are elusive if not beside the point.

Behind the glowing screen
Interview by Carol Clark
In search of the physical Internet, Andrew Blum ’99 followed a cable from his back yard in Brooklyn, N.Y., to an office park in Ashburn, Va., to a manhole in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Permanent Adoptions
By Emily Gold Boutilier
The Mead Art Museum has recently added 900 objects—including an Alfred Sisley painting and works by several Amherst alumni—to its 18,000-item collection.

Departments

College Row
Elevating the college party - From farm to table in 1,500 yards - Rachel Maddow visits campus - And more

Sports
Men’s basketball went to Atlanta, rubbed elbows with coaching greats and took home a national title.

Beyond Campus
Food: Two ’89s made something so delicious that they decided to sell it.
Messes:
Are junk drawers a universal part of human nature?
Playing Doctor:
James Fulmer ’76 invented a board game.
Lost and Found: While surveying the streets after Hurricane Sandy, a New Jersey police officer found a 1957 Amherst basketball.

Point of View
Hello to All That: A West Village studio apartment cradled Soo Youn ’96 into her 30s.

Amherst Creates
Multimedia: Jonah D. Ansell ’03’s Cadaver
Fiction: Schroder, by Visiting Writer Amity Gaige, and The Storms of Denali, by Nicholas O’Connell ’80
Criticism: William H. Pritchard ’53 on what’s happening to Jane Austen
Memoir: Ghost Dances, by Josh Garrett-Davis ’02

Appreciation
Professor Amelie Hastie on the late Homeland writer and director Henry Bromell ’70


Now and Then

During commencement week in 1974, four seniors delivered “glancing blows at Amherst, at society,
and, most predictably, at ourselves, the Class of 1974.”


Hearkening back to an earlier era, before polyester was king, students in  the history of art course “The Sixties” donned period clothing to set the mood for some peace, love and outdoor splatter painting this May.

Top photo from Amherst College Archives; bottom photo by Rob Mattson