“A New Test of Leadership”—Chronicle of Higher Ed Profiles Biddy Martin

Amherst College President Biddy Martin was recently the subject of an exhaustive front page profile in the Chronicle of Higher Education. The piece, a thorough and balanced account of her transition from the University of Wisconsin at Madison to Amherst, was the result of Amherst College providing reporter Jack Stripling with access to the college and its inner workings, including a meeting of the Committee of Six.

A New Test of Leadership” (PDF)

audioPodcast interview with reporter Jack Stripling

Douglas on the Death of Demjanjuk

Submitted on Monday, 3/26/2012, at 11:38 AM

Lawrence Douglas, James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, spoke with the Reuters news service and subsequently wrote a March 20 piece for Salon.com about the recent death of John Demjanjuk, a retired U.S. engine mechanic convicted in 2011 for his role in killing 28,000 Jews as a guard at a Nazi death camp during World War Two. "His passing brings us closer to the day when the Holocaust moves from lived memory of survivors and perpetrators into history," Douglas told Reuters. "That one of the last trials (linked to the Nazi era) involved such a minor figure in no way detracts from the justice of the case.” Douglas concluded in the Salon.com article, “That this era should end not with a Goering or an Eichmann or even a Barbie in the dock is less ironic than it is fitting. The Holocaust was not accomplished through the acts of Nazi statesmen, SS bureaucrats and Gestapo henchmen alone. It was made possible by the Demjanjuks of the world, the thousands of lowly foot soldiers of genocide.”

Everybody Has a Story

Submitted on Monday, 3/26/2012, at 11:37 AM

Everybody Has a Story Week was the subject of a March 16 article in the Daily Hampshire Gazette and March 23 editorial in the Amherst Bulletin. "The whole point is to build relationships and have meaningful conversations," said Director of Religious Life Paul Sorrentino. Paul chairs the Interfaith and Community Challenge Committee, which set out to get people who normally don’t socialize with one another to connect. “This is a campaign with a head and a heart,” the Bulletin editor wrote, “It understands that until people with different views understand one another and respect their differences, their best work together will remain undone.”

Leise: Stay in the Dark to Fight Jet Lag

Submitted on Tuesday, 3/20/2012, at 10:06 AM

Tanya Leise, assistant professor of mathematics, recently recorded an Academic Minute segment for Inside Higher Ed on the biology of jet lag. “Research conducted by my colleagues and me has found that travelers can avoid the dreaded jet lag by going to bed at the right time for the new time zone, and sleeping in a very dark room,” said Leise, whose research interests includes biologic clocks. “For those flying east and crossing five or six time zones, delaying exposure to light until mid-morning on the first day in the new time zone is one of the most effective measures in terms shifting the internal clock in the right direction,” she said.

Plumer on the Shortage of Women Hockey Coaches

Submitted on Tuesday, 3/20/2012, at 9:31 AM

The New York Times spoke with coach Jim Plumer for a March 17 article about the declining number of women who choose to coach college hockey. “People get in and see what’s involved,” he said. “They say: ‘I want to do this. I’m passionate about this. But I want a family. I’m in a relationship that’s important to me. It might take me 10 or 15 years to become a head coach, and the money isn’t that great. That doesn’t feel all that appealing to me. And I don’t want to move two or three times.’…I can’t blame them. That’s a legitimate reason for someone to say, ‘I don’t want to do this.’ It’s no one’s fault.”

Pritchard Reviews Begley's Latest Novel

Submitted on Tuesday, 3/20/2012, at 9:19 AM

In the Boston Globe, English professor William H. Pritchard reviewed Louis Begley's new novel, Schmidt Steps Back: “The most lively pages are ones [Schmidt’s] animus against the trendy, the petty, and the self-righteous are given full rein. His irascibility, at times directed against himself, represents the other side of an embrace of positive things - like imagination, love, irony, the occasional double bourbon, and the novels of Trollope. One feels these are qualities and pleasures that, like his protagonist, Louis Begley finds sustaining and around which he has woven an appealing novel.”

Parker: Best Students Want Diversity

Thomas H. Parker, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid, was quoted in recent press accounts decrying the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to hear a case which would revisit the use affirmative action in college admissions. Educators are concerned that the court could possibly undo the 2003 Grutter v. Bollinger case which allowed colleges to assure diversity by taking race into account when enrolling students.

Parker told the New York Times, “Nine years, when you’re talking about a decision of this magnitude, it really took me aback. What happens with the next president, the next Supreme Court appointee? Do we revisit it again, so that higher education is zigging and zagging? If the court says that any consideration of race whatsoever is prohibited, then we’re in a real pickle. Bright kids have no interest in homogeneity. They find it creepy.”

“What happens if the swing vote changes in six or seven years? Do we revisit it again? This is not a way to establish law,’’ he told the Boston Globe.

Billy McBride on Paintings of the Negro Baseball Leagues

Billy McBride, Assistant Athletic Director-Diversity and Inclusion, spoke with Springfield’s WGGB-TV for a piece on the history of negro league baseball, currently the subject of an exhibit of paintings by Kadir Nelson at the Eric Carle Museum. McBride said, “I can appreciate how [Nelson] captured the essence of our history, of things that went before that a lot of the time you simply don’t know…There is a history, there is a strong history of Black Americans, of African Americans in this country who have done great things.  But a lot of our children and a lot of our colleagues don’t know.”

Gazette: Martin Focuses on the Community

President Biddy Martin was the subject of a Feb. 18 story in the Daily Hampshire Gazette. The article touches on plans for the college, including the new $200 million science building, community outreach by students, and building closer ties with town officials and local community colleges.

Corrales Comments on Chavez Cancer

Political science professor Javier Corrales recently spoke with the Associated Press following news that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez will be undergoing surgery in Cuba to remove a cancerous growth.

“The key question is whether [Chavez] is beginning to pay attention to advice from all those forces, ranging from family members to political operators, telling him to come forward with a succession plan,” Corrales said.

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