"Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement as Precedent for Religion in U.S. Politics"

November 14, 2013 - 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm (already occurred)

Albert J. Raboteau is the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Religion Emeritus at Princeton University, where he taught from 1982 until his retirement earlier this year. Professor Raboteau will speak on "Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement as Precedent for Religion in U.S. Politics" at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 14, in Chapin 101.

A specialist in American religious history, Raboteau is best known for his landmark contributions to the study of African-American religious movements. His extensive publications in this area include "Slave Religion: The 'Invisible Institution' in the Antebellum South" (a “classic” reissued in an updated 25th anniversary edition in 2004), "A Fire in the Bones: Reflections on African-American Religious History," "African-American Religion: Interpretative Essay in History," co-edited with Timothy Fulop, and "Canaan Land: A Religious History of African Americans." His other publications include "A Sorrowful Joy" and, most recently, "Immigration and Religion in America: Comparative and Historical Perspectives," co-edited with Richard Alba and Josh DeWind. In addition to Martin Luther King Jr., figures of particular interest to Professor Raboteau include Howard Thurman, Dorothy Day and Thomas Merton. He is currently working on the place of beauty in the history of Eastern and Western Christian spirituality. The lecture is sponsored by the Religion Department and the Willis D. Wood Fund and is free and open to the public.

Contact Info

Diane L. Dix
413-542-2181
image of e-mail address@amherst.edu