Event Calendar

Week of April 7, 2013

Sun, Apr 7, 2013

Men's Basketball NCAA Championship Game Viewing Party

Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum

Couldn't make it to Atlanta to support the men's basketball game in their quest to win a second national championship? Cheer them on from campus! Join the Friends of Amherst Athletics and fellow fans in Stirn Auditorium where the action will be streamed live.

Bi-Semester Christian Worship Service

Chapin Hall, Chapel

The Hermenia T. Gardner Bi-Semester Christian Worship Service will take place on Sunday, April 7, in Chapin Chapel. Mrs. Hermenia Gardner is the speaker. Seniors will also be honored during the service. The service features music from the Amherst College Gospel Choir. A soul food reception will follow. Please contact Constance Holden at cholden15@amherst.edu or The Rev. Dr. Paul Sorrentino at pvsorrentino@amherst.edu for more information. All are welcome to attend!

"On Stage(s)": Women of Amherst 2013

On April 5-7, the Women of Amherst will perform an original show about the stages we all go through, the defining moments we collectively recall that, at their core, are profoundly unique and deeply personal. Written by members of the Amherst community, "(On)Stages" includes true stories of hilarious and harrowing experiences alike. All proceeds go to the New England Learning Center for Women in Transition, a local center for survivors of domestic abuse. For tickets, please visit www.womenofamherst.eventbrite.com.

Art and Fear: the Perils of Creativity in the 21st Century.

Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

The “Art in Place / The Place of Art” series at Amherst College continues with a presentation and open discussion with Copeland fellow Matana Roberts, entitled “Art and Fear: the Perils of Creativity in the 21st Century”. Free and open to the public.
Matana Roberts is a Chicago-born, New York-based saxophonist, improviser and composer who works as a soloist and a multimedia collaborator. Matana’s current sound project, COIN COIN, brings a genealogical history of Africans in America together with research into her own ancestry.
She says of her work, "COIN COIN is a compositional sound language that I have been developing since 2006. My initial interest in creating this work came from my childhood fascination with ghosts, spirits, spooks, and the faint traces of what they leave behind. I have a deep interest in old, antique objects of human existence, mostly because of the variety of story that can be created, factual or not, from the possibility of their being. This project is a combination of those interests as well as my delight in musical communication , ritual adornment, and the genealogical 20th century history of Africans in America. In some instances I am using information that I have gleaned from research into my own ancestral history, as inspiration and area of creative consideration. The musical root of much of this work also stems from my continued attraction/repulsion to certain aspects of the American Jazz tradition(s) which I am deeply involved with as an alto saxophonist."
Various movements of the piece have already been composed, workshopped and performed. The first movement, Chapter 1 "Gens De Couleur Libres (or free people of color)," was recently released as an audio album.
"Art in Place / the Place of Art" is a one-year interdisciplinary arts series at Amherst College which explores the myriad relationships that the arts have with place, and how artistic practice helps to shape our senses of place, identity, communities, cultures, institutions, and conversations. It is organized by faculty from the Departments of Art & the History of Art, Music and Theater & Dance, as well as the Mead Art Museum and the Frost Library.

The event is part of “Virtual Tour: A Reduced-Carbon Footprint Concert Series,” a three-concert series that will occur on April 5-7, 2013 featuring performances between UC San Diego and different locations for each concert. Live audiences will be present at all locations. The “tour” kicks off with the Amherst concert featuring Robinson, Ehrlich, and Weiner and continues with Matthias Ziegler and Gerry Hemingway at the Institute for Computer Music and Sound Technology (ICST) in Zurich, Switzerland on Apr. 6, and Sarah Weaver, Jane Ira Bloom, Ray Anderson, Min Xiao Fen and Matt Wilson at the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics, Consortium for Digital Arts, Culture, and Technology (cDACT) at Stony Brook University in New York on Apr. 7. Taking advantage of high bandwidth networks available only at research and educational institutions, these concerts will feature virtuoso performers performing together across thousands of miles with lifelike, uncompressed audio and minimal time delays and HD video, setting a new standard for music making on the telematic stage.

This Virtual Tour builds upon years of collaborative exploration into the artistic potential of telematics for improvisers performing simultaneously at great geographical distances. Co-directors Mark Dresser and Michael Dessen and site-directors Sarah Weaver and Jason Robinson have been leading innovators in the field of networked jazz and improvised music. This project represents an important step forward: a “virtual tour” in which a core group at UC San Diego will perform a series of concerts with other ensembles and live audiences in different cities each night. The tour will feature premieres of new compositions created specifically for the telematic stage by Mark Dresser, Michael Dessen, Nicole Mitchell, Jason Robinson, Marty Ehrlich, Gerry Hemingway, Matthias Ziegler and Sarah Weaver.

Catholic Liturgy

Chapin Hall, Chapel

Join the Catholic community in the celebration of the Mass. All are welcome. Missalettes and guides are provided. The Rev. John Gawienowski is our celebrant this week.

Mon, Apr 8, 2013

German Table

From 11:45 am. to 1:30 p.m., come to chat and practice your German with faculty and friends in the Mezzanine of Valentine Dining Hall.

Japanese Language Table

Valentine Dining Hall, Terrace Room A

The Japanese Language Table will meet this semester on Mondays from noon to 1 p.m.(for first-year language students), Wednesdays from noon to 1 p.m. and Fridays from noon to 1:30 p.m. starting on Friday, Feb. 1. Meetings will take place downstairs in Valentine in Terrace Room A on Mondays and Fridays, and in the South Conference Room on Wednesdays.

Biology Seminar: Stephen Devoto, Ph.D.

Stephen Devoto, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Biology Department and the Neuroscience and Behavior Program at Wesleyan University. His lab studies the development of muscle and muscle stem cells as part of a broader goal of understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of specific identities during development. They use zebrafish as a model for all vertebrates, including humans, because zebrafish are readily accessible for experimental manipulations throughout development and because a genetic approach to studying development is feasible. Muscle is a very abundant and easily accessible tissue, and diseases of muscle development are debilitating and common childhood diseases. Vertebrate muscle precursors derive from a transient embryonic tissue known as the dermomyotome. The development of the dermomyotome and the morphogenesis of the myotome take place within the somites, epithelial segments of the paraxial mesoderm. They have recently identified a transcription factor, Tbx6, as an important regulator of dermomyotome development. Tbx6 also regulates somite formation, and they are now examining other genes that regulate somite formation and interact with Tbx6. They hope to understand the gene regulatory network that regulates muscle and muscle stem cell development in the early embryo.

Writing After Amherst: The Freelance Life

Two Amherst grads (and former Zu housemates) read from their work and field questions about writing, publishing and freelancing.

Presentation by UMass Medical School

If you're interested in surgery or want to learn more about the UMass Medical School in Worcester and medical school in general, we're excited to have Dr. Mitch Cahan join us in the Career Center Conference Room in College Hall on Monday, April 8, at 7:30 p.m.

Dr. Cahan, associate professor of surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, will show a fascinating DVD entitled "Redefining Surgery". The last quarter of a century has seen remarkable changes in the training of surgeons and the evolution of surgical technology, making surgery an attractive specialty for those interested in medicine. Dr. Cahan will describe his own path to general surgery and answer any of your questions about applying for medical school, UMass Medical School in particular or your potential interest in surgery.

Tue, Apr 9, 2013

Table: Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA)

1) Learn the ins and outs of running a successful, long-term "buy local" campaign with proven impact on local agriculture. Provide support to the campaign manager, including delivering materials to farms and other Local Hero members, setting up visits of local farms for staff, writing farm and business profiles for newsletters.

2) Research and write material for CISA's website, email newsletters, and reports. Help maintain website and email newsletters.

3) Support outreach to potential business and corporate partners, including research, development of materials, and administrative support. Prepare and distribute membership materials at community events, farmers' markets, market co-ops and retail locations and assist with membership mailings, appeals, and record-keeping. Help in event planning for fall fundraiser and summer house parties.

4) Assist in research assessing the economic impact of local buying and the impact of investment in local and regional agricultural infrastructure. Support the development of tools for communicating this information to consumers, such as on-line calculators.

Flamenco Dance Classes

Newport House

No previous knowledge about dancing is required. All classes are independent, so don't worry if you missed the first one!

FOUR SESSIONS: Tuesday, April 9, to Friday, April 12, 3-4 p.m.

Mead Book Signing at Amherst Books

Join us at Amherst Books (8 Main Street in Amherst) to celebrate the newly published catalogue "Picturing Enlightenment: Tibetan Tangkas in the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College," with a book signing and reception with catalogue editor and main author Marylin M. Rhie, the Jesse Wells Post Professor of Art and Professor of East Asian Studies at Smith College, and essay contributors Maria Heim, associate professor of religion and Buddhist studies at Amherst College; Paola Zamperini, associate professor of Asian languages and civilizations at Amherst College; and Camille Myers Breeze, director of Museum Textile Services.

"Rethinking South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission"

The 2013 Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lecture will be "Rethinking South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission" with Adam Sitze, assistant professor of law, jurisprudence and social thought. The lecture will be held on Tuesday, April 9, at 4:30 p.m. in the Alumni House. The lecture is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

"Fellowship Opportunities: Start the Process Now"

Converse Hall, Cole Assembly

Juniors and sophomores are encouraged to join Tony Claudino, director of Fulbright Student Program outreach, and panel members Evan Braun '10 (Fulbright Scholar 2010), Lindsay Stern '13 and Keri Lambert '13 (Watson Fellows 2013), who will provide information about the Fulbright and Watson experience and application process. Director of Fellowship Advising Denise Gagnon will give an overview of the fellowship opportunities available through the Office of Fellowships.

Also see Part 2 on April 11 (see separate Event Calendar listing) to learn about other fellowships.

Study-Abroad Peer Advisors' Open Hours

How do you navigate your study-abroad options, which may be many? With the help of the Study Abroad Peer Advisors! Each Tuesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Career Center (College Hall), these two seniors are available to answer your questions, show you how to research programs and tell you about their experiences abroad. Learn more about them here: https://www.amherst.edu/mm/333642

How to be a Professional Poet & Why it Might Even be a Good Idea

How to be a Professional Poet, and Why it Might Even be a Good Idea.

You'd have to be crazy to try being a professional poet in this economy, right? Maybe. But just because it's crazy doesn't mean it's a bad idea. After all, career moves that appeared eminently sensible in 2008 can look downright nutty today. Might there be some value, even some practicality, in doing what you love?

If you want to be a professional poet, you can't just be a good poet. You must also be a good professional. They don't teach professionalism in Johnson Chapel, but you still need to understand it before you hit the workforce. This will not be a writing workshop, but a talk and Q&A session on professional skills for poets, comedians, singer/songwriters, and other creative writers. (If your career plans terrify your parents, then this talk is for you!)
• The relationship between art and commerce…and why you need to stop making that face you just made (we saw it!).
• Basic business skills you need to know and how to learn them.
• Why your resume matters, why your resume probably stinks, and how to fix it.
• Why you need to stop saying "once I graduate, I'll…"
Artie Moffa '00 is the founding editor of Bicycle Comics and the co-producer of San Francisco's The Lit Slam. A three-year veteran of the Boston Poetry Slam and a five-year veteran of Pearson Custom Publishing, he was the co-author of 2009's Boys at Play, a collection of light verse and comics to benefit the Annual Fund.

German Kaffeeklatsch

Porter House

Come and join us for Kaffee and much more, every Tuesday evening at 9 p.m. at Porter House.

Wed, Apr 10, 2013

New Exhibits at Beyond Words Gallery

Frost Library, Beyond Words Gallery

Come to the second floor of Frost Library to view the student exhibits on display at Beyond Words Gallery!

Anzia Rae Mayer '13 presents two styles of ancient Chinese calligraphy dating as far back as 1000 BC and as recently as 200 BC, including China's first standardized written script. Eirene Wang '13 exhibits the best strips from The Amherst Student's only syndicated strip, "The Hamster Student," as well as other pieces from her first comic book compilation. And Sebastian Herrera '14 portrays absurd or fantastic situations in 35mm color film.

Interested in displaying your student work next year? Contact Amy Johnson at ahjohnson@amherst.edu.

Info Table: SIT Study Abroad

A pioneer in experiential, field-based study abroad, SIT offers semester, summer and academic-year programs for undergraduate students in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East, as well as comparative programs in multiple locations. Meet with SIT representative Wanda Dutton to learn more about study-abroad opportunities on Wednesday, April 10, between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the Keefe Campus Center.

Flamenco Dance Classes

Newport House

No previous knowledge about dancing is required. All classes are independent, so don't worry if you missed the first one!

FOUR SESSIONS: Tuesday, April 9, to Friday, April 12, 3-4 p.m.

"Focusing on the System: A Somewhat Different Career in Medicine"

Aaron Carroll, MD, MS '94 will be giving a talk on "Focusing on the System: A Somewhat Different Career in Medicine". Dr. Carroll is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Assistant Dean for Research Mentoring, and Director of the Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research at the Indiana School of Medicine.

Screening and Film Presentation by Freya Klier

Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum

East German human rights activist and filmmaker Freya Klier will present her film, "We want to be free! East Germans Rise Up, 1953".

Fourth and Final Lecture in the 2012-2013 Forry and Micken Lecture Series on “Climate, Nature and the Frontiers of Ethics”

John Broome from Corpus Christi College, Oxford, will present the fourth and final lecture of the 2012-2013 Forry and Micken Lecture Series on Environmental Philosophy. His talk is titled "The Public and Private Ethics of Climate Change." The talk will take place on Wednesday, April 10, in Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at 4:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For further information, please contact Dee Brace at 413-542-5805.

Chess Club Practice

Valentine Dining Hall, Conference Room

Come enjoy a game or two while you have dinner! Open to anyone interested!

Writing & Producing for TV with Emmy Award Winner Norman Steinberg

Norman Steinberg’s work has been recognized with an Emmy Award, a Writer’s Guild Award and a British Academy Award nomination. Steinberg has penned screenplays for numerous films, including “Blazing Saddles,” “My Favorite Year” and “Johnny Dangerously.” In the television arena, he has served as writer, creator showrunner and executive producer, leaving his mark on such programs as “Cosby,” “When Things Were Rotten,” “Doctor, Doctor,” Showtime’s “Paradise” and the upcoming series “Chemistry.”

He previously taught at the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University and at the American Film Institute (AFI). A graduate of the University of Maryland and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Steinberg also was a practicing attorney, specializing in entertainment and copyright law.

He will be sharing information about his experiences and the TV Writer's Studio (M.F.A.) program at Long Island University: Brooklyn.

Spanish Film Festival: "The Death of Pinochet"

Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum, 115

On Dec. 10, 2006, Gen. Pinochet died in Santiago’s Military Hospital. For 24 hours, his death reawakened the political divisions that marked Chile’s recent history with dictatorship, death and violence. In "The Death of Pinochet," Bettina Perut and Ivan Osnovikoff use original footage and the testimonies of four characters who lived through that day to relate the end of a key chapter in Chile’s history. A work that balances tragedy and comedy, it is a surprising portrait of Chilean society. In observing and giving voice to a group of Chilean people on a very special day in that country’s history, Perut and Osnovikoff show the same provocative spirit that they demonstrated in their previous film, "Noticias" ("News"). By the time of his death, Pinochet had not held power in Chile for several years. However, this fascinating documentary shows that although Pinochet may now be gone, he has certainly not been forgotten.

"Great Careers in Advertising and Marketing"

Elliott Easterling '93 will present the career landscape in the marketing and advertising industry. He will talk about options for working at tech startups, big brands and advertising agencies. He will also present the range of jobs and roles that are available to students interested in this field and lay out strategies for landing jobs and internships.

One of the myths that Elliott wants to dispel is that there is no role for scientists in marketing. Elliott works in an area of marketing that leverages both creative and quantitative minds. Math, bio, chem and physics majors are welcome to attend!

ABOUT ELLIOTT
Elliott is a 15-year digital marketing veteran who runs two businesses: a digital advertising agency, Red Bricks Media (RBM), and a Web incubator, Folsom Media.

In 2003, Elliott launched RBM and has been instructive in leading its fast-paced growth and regional expansion, servicing the needs of some of the world’s biggest brands. Elliott’s relentless pursuit of innovation and excellence has produced a sequence of new service lines that have consistently set the pace for the digital advertising industry. Prior to his current roles, Elliott was VP of sales and account management at Digital Impact (now Acxiom Digital) and oversaw 60 percent of the company’s accounts. Armed with a B.A. from Amherst College and a master’s degree in international technology management from UC San Diego, Elliott’s abiding interests include fluency in two languages, an appreciation for painting and photography and extensive world travel.

Wednesday Rosary Prayer & Spiritual Fellowship

Chapin Hall, Lounge

Newman Club members lead a Rosary Prayer in the peaceful, candle-lit chapel. Guides, rosaries and personal instruction is offered. We close with personal prayers of petition to our loving God. All are welcome to come for silent participation or to pray aloud. Join us on Wednesdays of weeks when classes are in session.

Thu, Apr 11, 2013

A Celebration for Terras Irradient (Past and Present)

Terras Irradient (Past and Present): Let Them Give Light to the World

Throughout Wendy Ewald’s Fall 2012 Art and the History of Art course "Collaborative Art: The Practices and Theory of Working with Communities," students were engaged with two “character” projects. One was historical, the other contemporary. The first installment, located downstairs in the display cases, exhibits carefully selected objects from the Amherst College archive, which the students felt best evoked the historical resonance of their subjects.
Each historical figure is connected to Amherst College. There are Amherst graduates, spouses of graduates and their children, each of whom played a role in the missionary efforts of the 18th and 19th centuries.
Missionaries figure importantly in the history of Amherst College, the motto on the Amherst seal being Terras Irradient, meaning “Let them give light to the world.” Throughout the semester, students researched their historical figures through archival materials. The final product was a book, which connects the historical and contemporary projects. A selection of these pages has been enlarged and is displayed to give a context for the contemporary art projects that evolved from the research on the missionaries.

For their contemporary projects, students paired up with members of the Senior Center at the Bangs Community Center in Amherst and collaborated on art projects that were produced in a wide range of mediums. The students discussed their historical characters with their partners and tried to find a connection by means of which they could collaborate on a new art project. Some projects have a stronger connection with their historical characters than others. As a result, each project is different, and the ensemble makes for an interesting collection of work. Throughout the semester, students learned about what it meant to work collaboratively and the importance of engaging with the community and doing so respectfully. They spent a lot of time with their community members from the Senior Center and have developed wonderful relationships, which will continue beyond the projects seen before you today.

Flamenco Dance Classes

Newport House

No previous knowledge about dancing is required. All classes are independent, so don't worry if you missed the first one!

FOUR SESSIONS: Tuesday, April 9, to Friday, April 12, 3-4 p.m.

"Solutions to the Demise of the North American Prairie" CANCELLED

Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

Renowned writer William Least Heat-Moon described the American prairie as “the center of our national identity.” Shockingly, what little that remains of the tall-grass prairie now is being plowed up to plant more corn and soybeans in response to record grain prices. In a bold and innovative experiment, EcoSun Prairie Farms, a nonprofit South Dakota corporation, is reversing this trend by transforming a corn and soybean farm to one with restored prairie and wetlands as a means of demonstrating how to make a living from grassland while protecting and improving the environment. This seminar documents the highs and lows of ecological farming by examining the challenges of grassland restoration and the search for new income streams to make prairie farming sustainable and attractive to producers.

"Rethinking Cosmopolitanism: Is ‘Afropolitan’ the Answer?"

Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

Salah M. Hassan, a leading critic and curator of contemporary African and African-American art and professor of African and African Diaspora art history and visual culture at Cornell University, will deliver the lecture “Rethinking Cosmopolitanism: Is ‘Afropolitan’ the Answer?” in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall on Thursday, April 11, at 4:30 p.m.

The lecture is free and open to the public and has been organized by Rowland O. Abiodun, the John C. Newton Professor of the History of Art and Black Studies and chair of Black studies at Amherst College. It is co-sponsored by Amherst College’s Departments of Black Studies and Art and the History of Art, the Mead Art Museum and the Office of the President.

Physics Seminar

Prof. Steve Lamoreaux, Yale, title TBA

"Fellowship Opportunities: Start the Process Now"

Converse Hall, Cole Assembly

Juniors and sophomores are encouraged to join Jordan Krall ’01 (Rhodes Scholar 2001-02) and Clare Howard ’10 (Gates Scholar 2010-11 and Fulbright Scholar 2011-12), who will present and discuss information about the Rhodes and Gates Scholarships. Director of Fellowship Advising Denise Gagnon will provide information and an overview of all the fellowship opportunities available through the Office of Fellowships, including the Marshall, Mitchell and Luce Scholarships. David Schneider, Professor of Music, will offer guidance and advice about how to ask for and receive strong letters of recommendation from faculty.

Also see Part 1 on April 9 (see separate Event Calendar listing) to learn about other fellowships.

Presentation by Dr. Aaron Carroll '94

Interested in health policy, health economics, health information technology, writing books and combining any of this with a health professions career? We're excited to have Dr. Aaron Carroll '94 return to campus! He'll be presenting and discussing his career path on Thursday, April 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the Career Center Conference Room in College Hall.

Dr. Aaron Carroll '94 is an associate professor of pediatrics, assistant dean for research mentoring and director of the Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research at Indiana University School of Medicine. He earned a B.A. in chemistry from Amherst College, an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and an M.S. in health services from the University of Washington, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar. His research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care and areas of health policy, including physician malpractice, the pharmaceutical industry/physician relationship and health care reform. He writes about health policy for CNN.com and the JAMA forum, and he is the coauthor of two books on medical myths: "Don't Swallow Your Gum: Myths, Half-Truths, and Outright Lies About Your Body and Health" and "Don't Cross Your Eyes... They'll Get Stuck That Way! And 75 Other Health Myths Debunked". His work has been featured in nearly all major international print magazines and newspapers, and he has appeared on many TV programs, including "The Colbert Report."

Film Screening of Disney's "Pocahontas"

Merrill Science Center, Lecture Room 4

Join the Native American Students Organization for a screening and discussion of Disney’s Pocahontas. We will be considering stereotypes and tropes related to Native Americans in popular culture, including miscegenation, landscape, gender roles, pan-Indian portrayal, and historical inaccuracy. This event is a collaborative effort with the Gender Justice Collective (formerly the Amherst Feminist Alliance).

Generously sponsored by the AAS.

Check us out on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/amherstnaso

A Discussion with 30-Year Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau

Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

The Amherst Political Union (APU) is honored to welcome former Manhattan District Attorney Robert M. Morgenthau back to Amherst College. Morgenthau, alum of the Class of 1941, helped to found the APU almost 75 years ago. Now, after a career as one of the most iconic figures in law enforcement history, Morgenthau will return to Amherst for a conversation with Professor of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought Lawrence Douglas on Thursday, April 11 at 8:00 P.M. in Pruyne Lecture Hall. They will discuss crime, immigration, and Morgenthau’s life as a Navy officer, a New York gubernatorial candidate, and nine-time elected Manhattan DA. This event is free and open to the public.

No-Mic Open-Mic Poetry Night April 11

A venue for students to read and share their own or their favorite poems. There will be Sugar Jones!

Fri, Apr 12, 2013

Community Hour with Professor Catherine Sanderson

Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum

Join us and hear what everyone is talking about! There has long been a buzz about Catherine Sanderson's views on happiness. Here is your chance to get the info first hand. Students, faculty and staff are invited to the second Community Hour on Friday, April 12 at 11 a.m. in Stirn Auditorium.

This talk presents both surprising and not-so-surprising information on the science behind happiness. What role do money, IQ, marriage, friends, children, weather, and religion play in making us feel happier? Is happiness stable over time? How can happiness be increased? Professor Catherine Sanderson will describe cutting-edge research from the field of positive psychology on the factors that do (and do not) predict happiness, and provide participants with practical (and relatively easy!) ways to increase their own psychological well-being.

French Table

French Table will meet from 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. on Fridays on the Mezzanine in Val. French speakers of all levels are welcome to attend.

Spanish Table

Valentine Dining Hall, Mezzanine Gallery

Spanish Table will meet from noon to 2 p.m. on Fridays, beginning Jan. 25. Spanish speakers of all levels are welcome to attend.

Japanese Language Table

Valentine Dining Hall, Terrace Room A

The Japanese Language Table will meet this semester on Mondays from noon to 1 p.m.(for first-year language students), Wednesdays from noon to 1 p.m. and Fridays from noon to 1:30 p.m. starting on Friday, Feb. 1. Meetings will take place downstairs in Valentine in Terrace Room A on Mondays and Fridays, and in the South Conference Room on Wednesdays.

Russian Table

Join us on Fridays from noon to 1:30 p.m. on the Mezzanine level of Valentine for lunch and Russian conversation with faculty and friends.

First-Year Friday: "Networking Do's & Don't's"

Did you know that 70 to 80 percent of all jobs and internships are never listed but are gotten through the power of networking? In this session, geared toward first-year students, begin practicing your networking skills and learn about the “do's” and “don't's” of effective networking. Bring your Grab 'n Go lunch.

"Punishment in Popular Culture" Conference

On Friday and Saturday, April 12 and 13, in the Alumni House at Amherst College, there will be a conference entitled “Punishment in Popular Culture.” The conference will feature presentations from a number of distinguished scholars, including Amy Adler (NYU), Brandon Garrett (Virginia Law), Kristen Henning (Georgetown Law), Daniel LaChance (University of Massachusetts), Larry May (University of Minnesota), Karl Shoemaker (University of Wisconsin Law), Aurora Wallace (NYU Steinhardt) and Kristen Whissel (UC Berkeley). The conference will explore the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture. This conference is being sponsored by the Charles Hamilton Houston Forum on Law and Social Justice and the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School.

"The Spectacle of Punishment and the Melodramatic Imagination in the Classical Hollywood Prison Film"

Kristen Whissel from the University of California, Berkley, presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

"The Pornography of Punishment"

Amy Adler from the NYU School of Law presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

Steps to Study Abroad

Learn the basics for planning to study abroad. This session (offered every Friday afternoon) is required for new study-abroad applicants prior to meeting with Dean Behrens to plan your program.

Celebrating Architectural Studies: Perspectives From Five Young Alumni

Mead Art Museum, William Green Study Room

Panel presentations by alumni working in architectural studies will take place in the Mead Art Museum from 2-4pm followed by a reception.

"'"Deserve" Ain't Got Nothing to Do with It': The Breakdown of Moral Justifications for Punishment in 'The Wire'"

Kristin N. Henning from Georgetown Law School presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

Flamenco Dance Classes

Newport House

No previous knowledge about dancing is required. All classes are independent, so don't worry if you missed the first one!

FOUR SESSIONS: Tuesday, April 9, to Friday, April 12, 3-4 p.m.

"Punishment by Death: The 'Sons of Anarchy,' Seigniorial Justice and the Impoverishment of American Penal Thought"

Karl Shoemaker from the University of Wisconsin-Madison presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

First in My Family: Dessert Mixer for First-generation College Students, Staff, and Faculty

Converse Hall, Porter Lounge

Were you the first in your family to attend college? Campus community members who self-identify as first-generation college students/graduates are invited to connect at a dessert reception! RSVPs appreciated; email jmestre10@amherst.edu. Note: We recognize that the definition of “first-generation” varies, which is why we leave this up for personal interpretation.

"Scenes of Execution: Spectatorship, Political Responsibility and State Killing in American Film"

Austin Sarat, Madeline Chan, Maia Cole, Melissa Lang, Nicholas Schcolnik, Jasjaap Sidhu and Nica Siegal from Amherst College present as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

"Tres Colores: A Musical Journey of Immigration and Hope in America"

Buckley Recital Hall

"Tres Colores" is a collaboration between Amherst College Professor Ilan Stavans, the Kingswood Oxford Middle School Chorus, the Amherst College Concert Choir and composers Francisco Nunez and Jim Papoulis. It describes Stavans’ experience as an immigrant from Mexico to the United States.

CSA Screening: Somewhere Between

Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

This Friday, April 12, CSA is screening "Somewhere Between," a powerful documentary about four Chinese adoptee girls and their lives in the United States. It is a story of abandonment and heritage, receiving and giving, bitterness and happiness. These four personal accounts about self-discovery will inspire us to reflect upon important questions such as multi-cultural identities, adoption and China's One Child Policy. There will be an optional discussion after the screening. Pizza, wings, and bubble tea will be served.

Sat, Apr 13, 2013

"Redeeming the Lost War: Backlash Films and the Rise of the Punitive State"

Larry May from the University of Minnesota presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

"In the Shadow of State Violence: Popular Representations of Rehabilitation in the 1990s"

Daniel LeChance from the University of Massachusetts presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

"Better Here Than There: Prison Narratives in Reality Television"

Aurora Wallace from New York University presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in popular culture.

Family Fun Day at the Mead Art Museum

Celebrate spring at the Mead! Join us for this family-friendly afternoon of fun-filled activities for children and adults of all ages, including spring-themed tours of the museum’s galleries, a flora and fauna scavenger hunt and art-making projects. This event is free and open to the public, and no registration is required. Stop by anytime between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

"Images of Injustice"

Brandon Garrett from the University of Virginia School of Law presents as part of a conference entitled "Punishment in Popular Culture," exploring the presence of punishment as a subject in American popular culture.

Asian Night Market

Come celebrate different Asian cultures with KSA, CSA, and SASA! Food from Miss Saigon, Freshside, Panda East, and Paradise of India. Performances by DBJ from 5-college, Smikpop from Smith, Unity from Yale, and many talented students from Amherst! There will be activities such as origami and calligraphy after the show.

“One-Drop: Fact, Fiction, or Fate?” by Dr. Yaba Blay

Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum

What exactly is Blackness and what does it mean to be Black? Is Blackness a matter of biology or consciousness? Who determines who is Black and who is not? The State, the society, or the individual? On April 13th at 7pm, Dr. Yaba Blay, an Africana Studies professor at Drexel University, will present at Amherst in Stirn Auditorium. “One-Drop: Fact, Fiction, or Fate?” provides a brief social history of the laws instituted to regulate social interactions between the races and thus outlines how it is that the United States came to adopt the one-drop rule as the specific, and seemingly quantitative definition of Black identity. This presentation highlights the lived experiences of individuals for whom the one-drop rule exacts its influence most. There will be food and drinks!

For more information on (1)ne Drop, go here: http://1nedrop.com/

Zumbyes Spring Show

Merrill Science Center, Lecture Room 1

Come check out the Zumbyes' biggest and best show of the year! So long and amazing it requires division into two halves, this will also be your last chance to see our three amazing seniors (Dan Paltiel, Jake Samuels and Matt Fernald) in action. Don't miss out!

Tickets are $5 for all students and children and $10 for adults and may be purchased in Valentine during the week before the show, as well as at the door.

Arts at Amherst: Faculty Collaborations

The “Art in Place / The Place of Art” series at Amherst College concludes with "Arts at Amherst: Faculty Collaborations". Faculty organizers of this year’s “Art in Place” Copeland Colloquium from the departments of Theater & Dance, Music, and Art & the History of Art at Amherst College take the stage, collaborating on a variety of new multimedia works. Free and open to the public. No reservations required.

The program will include a wide variety of work, including a performance of George Crumb’s “Black Angels” by the locally-based Erebos String Quartet (Sarah Briggs & Joseph Jewett, violins, Delores Thayer, viola, and Rebecca Hartka, cello). Also featured will be a new duet by Theater & Dance faculty Wendy Woodson, performed by Ron Bashford and Paul Matteson. David Gloman will perform an improvisational painting in collaboration with Jason Robinson on saxophone and electronics; and Eric Sawyer’s piano duets will be performed by Judy Gordon and Alissa Leiser, accompanied by visuals from Betsey Garand.

"Art in Place / the Place of Art" is a one-year interdisciplinary arts series at Amherst College which explores the myriad relationships that the arts have with place, and how artistic practice helps to shape our senses of place, identity, communities, cultures, institutions, and conversations. It is organized by faculty from the Departments of Art & the History of Art, Music and Theater & Dance, as well as the Mead Art Museum and the Frost Library.

Free Public Observing at Amherst College's Observatory

Wilder Observatory, Snell Street

The Wilder Observatory on Snell Street is free and open to all, starting at 9 p.m. every clear Saturday from April through October. See (if they're in the sky at the time) the moon, planets, asteroids, comets, multiple stars, star clusters, nebulae, galaxies and more through the large, world-class refractor telescope. Students, faculty, staff, family and friends are welcome.

Ongoing Events

Campus Challenge Fill-A-Truck Food & Educational Supply Drive

Form a friendly competition among teams, join a "tabling" group, or donate individually. We will be happy to accept nonperishable food items and school supplies. Drop-off sites include Barrett Hall, the Cadigan Center, Chapin Hall, College Hall, Converse, Fayerweather, Frost Library, Merrill Science Center, Pontypool, Pratt, Seelye Mudd and Smith House.

Be counted! Register your donation to Campus Challenge-sponsored drives or to ANY organization addressing poverty and/or educational opportunity. Complete a participation form online at http://www.amherst.edu/go/campuschallenge. The form may be submitted anonymously. Bonus: every participation form is entered into a drawing for $200 to be made at the end of April. Even though our major drives this year were scheduled for spring, we made significant progress in the fall. We can reach our goals for the year. The Campus Challenge Committee invites you to join them in making positive expressions of ways that Amherst staff, faculty and students relate with neighbors.

Finding Place

Fayerweather Hall, Eli Marsh Gallery

A multimedia exhibit exploring the realm of physical space and place, featuring local artists from around the Pioneer Valley. There will be a gallery talk on Thursday April 4th at 4:30.

“Art in Place / the Place of Art” is a one-year interdisciplinary arts series at Amherst College which explores the myriad relationships that the arts have with place, and how artistic practice helps to shape our senses of place, identity, communities, cultures, institutions, and conversations. It is organized by faculty from the Departments of Art & the History of Art, Music, and Theater & Dance, as well as the Mead Art Museum and the Frost Library. Support has been provided by the Copeland Colloquium, the Amherst Arts Series Fund, and the Dean of the Faculty.

Junior Jumpstart Series: Three Topics, Three Events!

Juniors, are you interested in getting a job, attending graduate or professional school or taking part in a fellowship program after you graduate? Do you want to know what you should be doing this spring and summer to set yourself up for success during senior year? These are workshops you don't want to miss!

1. "Kickstarting Your Job Search" | Career Center | Tuesday, April 2, 5 p.m.
Don't wait for senior year to get on track with your job search. Join Dean Ursula Olender and get a head start on researching and evaluating employment opportunities. Learn about hiring timelines, on-campus recruiting, networking with alumni and what you can do this summer to make your job search effective.

2. "Applying to Graduate School" | Career Center | Monday, April 8, 4 p.m.
Join Dean Debra Krumholz as she discusses decision-making, the application process and timelines and how you can start thinking about IF you want to go, WHEN you want to go and WHERE you want to go.

3. "The National Fellowships Application and the Fellowships Experience" | Cole Assembly Room (Converse Hall) | Tuesday, April 9, at 4:30 p.m. and Thursday, April 11, at 7 p.m.

April 9: Join Denise Gagnon, director of fellowships; Tony Claudino, director of Fulbright Student Program outreach; and panel members Evan Braun '10 (Fulbright Scholar 2010), Lindsay Stern '13 and Keri Lambert '13 (Watson Fellows 2013-14), who will provide information about the Fulbright and Watson experience and application process.

April 11: Join Gagnon, Jordan Krall '01 (Rhodes Scholar 2001-02) and Clare Howard '10 (Gates Scholar 2010-11 and Fulbright Scholar 2011-12) who will discuss the fellowship experience and provide information about the application process for the Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell, Gates and Luce Scholarships. Gagnon will give an overview of the fellowship opportunities available through the Office of Fellowships. David Schneider, professor of music, will offer guidance and advice about how to ask for and receive strong letters of recommendation from faculty.