Eight Books in One, Celebrating Individual & Collaborative Student Work

 Kimball photo classProfessor Kimball and his advanced photography students constructing collaborative art books.

Seven students in Professor Justin Kimball's advanced photography course "Eight People, One Place and a Book" spent the fall 2014 semester traveling to photograph the Village of Turners Falls, Mass., about half an hour from Amherst. Upon arrival each week, they split up to take photographs on their own with the goal of building individual bodies of work. 

Lit Course Spawns Collaborations, Partnerships

Submitted on Monday, 2/23/2015, at 10:43 AM

February 23, 2015

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Missy Roser ’94, head of research and instruction at Frost Library, and
Rhonda Cobham-Sander, professor of Black studies and English

Thanks to the digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), an entire collection on Panama and the Panama Canal is available online. For Rhonda Cobham-Sander, professor of Black studies and English at Amherst, the collection inspired a collaborative course—and promises a long-term international partnership.

Several years ago, Leah Rosenberg, associate professor of English at the University of Florida and fellow scholar of early Caribbean literature, introduced Cobham-Sander to dLOC, and Cobham-Sander was impressed: “They can digitize materials that were published long ago, or published in very small editions—the kinds of things that, when we were doing research as graduate students, we had to look long and hard to find.” Housed at the university, dLOC digitizes materials from libraries and archives across the Caribbean.

Caribbean Lit Course Helps Spawn an International Partnership

Caribbean Lit Course Helps Spawn an International Partnership

February 18, 2015

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Professor's Course Takes Students "Inside Iran"

Inside Iran, a seminar course being taught this semester by Monica Ringer, associate professor of history and Asian languages and civilizations, explores contemporary Iran from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective.

The College Farm Grows: More Produce, More Knowledge

Submitted on Thursday, 5/22/2014, at 2:57 PM

The growing season is in full swing at Book & Plow Farm but the spring semester already saw a harvest —of knowledge.

The farm is now in its second year of providing organic vegetables to Amherst College’s Dining Services (and a handful of other customers), with some produce from this year's crop --Red Leaf Lettuce, Romaine Lettuce, Bok Choy, Scallions and Radishes-- already in the meal plans for Reunion 2014. The on-campus farm is expanding its operation, leasing more land from the college and coming up with increasingly ambitious plans for plantings.

In the Chemist's Kitchen: Teaching Science with Food

Submitted on Wednesday, 3/26/2014, at 5:09 PM

by William Sweet

In Patricia O’Hara’s popular new introductory chemistry course, the periodic table of elements includes nitrogen, mozzarella and prosciutto.

“Molecular Gastronomy and Food Science: From Test Tubes to Taste Buds” looks like a cross between a cooking class and a science lab—and that’s the point, said O’Hara, the Amanda and Lisa Cross Professor of Chemistry.

Global Valley: History & Culture in Our Back Yard

Submitted on Friday, 12/13/2013, at 2:44 PM

by William Sweet

“Global Valley” sounds like a contradiction, but the course, taught by Professors Lisa Brooks and Karen Sánchez-Eppler, delivers an ambitious amount of historical and cultural knowledge from sites barely a half-hour drive from campus.

The Point of Pointing

Submitted on Friday, 11/22/2013, at 4:42 PM

Article by Katherine Duke ’05

Photos by Rob Mattson

Human beings seem unique among species in our ability to communicate through words. But what about communication without words—through gestures? When a small child points a finger, or looks where someone else is pointing, in what sense is she engaged in “communication”? Is she using intellectual abilities that go beyond those of a dog or a chimpanzee? How can we tell?

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