Annual Emily Dickinson Poetry Walk Set For May 12

April 27, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass. - The Dickinson Homestead in Amherst will sponsor the annual Emily Dickinson Poetry Walk on Saturday, May 12, at 1 p.m. The walk honors the memory of the poet Emily Dickinson, who died on May 15, 1886. The event is free and open to the public.

The walk will begin at 1 p.m. in the garden at the Dickinson Homestead at 280 Main Street, and proceed through Amherst, stopping at various sites significant in Dickinson's life. (A full schedule follows.) Members of the Amherst community will read a selection of Dickinson's poems at each location. At 2:30 p.m. the procession will arrive at West Cemetery on Triangle Street to gather at the Dickinson grave, where all are welcome to read their favorite poems and to join in a lighthearted toast to the poet's memory.

The Dickinson Homestead will be open on May 12 from 1 to 5 p.m. for self-guided tours. Homestead guides will be on hand to answer questions. No reservations are necessary, and admission is free. The Dickinson Homestead is a National Historic Landmark owned by the Trustees of Amherst College. For more information call the Dickinson Homestead at 413/542-8161. The Homestead has a Website at http://www.dickinsonhomestead.org

Maps of the one-mile route of the Poetry Walk route will be available at the garden at the Homestead. Participants are welcome to join the walk at any point along the route. Those who wish to participate only in the cemetery reading should meet at the Dickinson grave in West Cemetery on Triangle St. at 2:30 p.m.

Emily Dickinson Poetry Walk
Schedule of Readings

1 p.m. Dickinson Homestead garden, 280 Main Street
1:20 p.m. Amherst Train Station, Railroad Street
1:40 p.m. Front steps of The Evergreens, 214 Main Street
2 p.m. Front lawn of the Jones Library, 43 Amity Street
2:20 p.m. Parking lot behind Zanna, 187 North Pleasant Street (next to Ren's Mobil Service, site of Dickinson home)
2:30 p.m. Dickinson grave site, West Cemetery, Triangle Street

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Catherine G. Pfaffenroth To Study Art History in Austria on Fulbright Grant

April 23, 2001
Director of Media
Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Catherine G. Pfaffenroth, a graduating senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study overseas. Pfaffenroth, daughter of Peter and Sara Pfaffenroth of Chester, N.J., will study the shifting boundaries between “fine art” and “crafts” in Vienna around 1900.

The Viennese Sezessionstil was the Austrian analogue of Parisian Art Nouveau: movements that “represented a change in approach to the creation of art,” as Pfaffenroth wrote in her Fulbright proposal. “There was significant public confusion as to whether this constituted a change in decorative style or a revolution in the methods of self-expression. Did individuals regard themselves as artists or craftsmen?”

Pfaffenroth plans academic study at the Faculty of Arts at the University of Vienna, with additional work at Secessionist Museum and the sterreichisches Museum fr agewandte Kunst. She hopes to work in the arts when she leaves Amherst and later attend graduate school in art history or decorative arts.

A European studies, fine arts and French major at Amherst, Pfaffenroth was the director of the Bluestockings, an a capella group, and also sang in the Amherst College Concert Choir. She worked as a yearbook photographer, and was a member of The Friends of the Amherst College Library and the Amherst Architecture Club.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in over 100 nations.

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Peter A. Kupfer To Study Musicology in Germany on Fulbright Grant

April 23, 2001
Director of Media
Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Peter A. Kupfer, a graduating senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study overseas. Kupfer, son of Carl and Carola Kupfer of Highland Park, Ill., will study how the cultural identity of the German Democratic Republic was embodied and reflected in the treatment of opera at the Komische Oper in East Berlin.

“How can such seemingly simple black marks on a white page create so many totally dissimilar, yet equally feasible, worlds?” Kupfer asked about music in his Fulbright proposal. “Not only did the East German government need to control music being composed during the Cold War, but it also needed to reconcile the music of the great German composers with its political agenda.”

Kupfer plans to examine the records and documents of the Komische Oper kept at the Deutsches Musikarchiv in Berlin, and to interpret their ideological importance in his studies in the Lehrgebiet fuer Musiksoziologie in the Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar at the Humboldt Universitaet.

A music, German studies and computer science major at Amherst, Kupfer has been president of the Amherst College Orchestra, in which he also played bassoon. He also played on the ultimate frisbee team and was president of the German House. Upon completing the Fulbright Kupfer plans to attend graduate school or work in the computer industry.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in over 100 nations.

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Stephen M. Ruckman To Study Political Ethics in the United Kingdom on Fulbright Grant

April 23, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Stephen M. Ruckman, a graduating senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study overseas. Ruckman, son of Roger and Kathy Ruckman of Chevy Chase, Md., will study the role of ethics in political philosophy in England or Scotland.

“ My central aim … is to thoroughly examine political action in a moral context, ” Ruckman wrote in his Fulbright proposal. “In my first class in political science at Amherst College, I was dismayed by the professor’s assertion that political leadership is only successful when it is amoral. I refused to be bound by Machiavelli. ”

Ruckman plans academic study in ethical philosophy at either the London School of Economics or the University of Edinburgh. He hopes to earn a law degree one day and work in government.

Ruckman, a political science major at Amherst, has been the principal violist with the Amherst College Orchestra and played with the Tsrema string quartet for four years. Active in student politics, Ruckman was elected president of the Student Government Organization in his senior year, and was a member of the Amherst College Diversity Coalition. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in over 100 nations.

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Three Concerts of Instrumental Music in April and May

April 20, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass. - The orchestra and chamber music ensembles of Amherst College will present three free concerts in Buckley Recital Hall at the college.

The Amherst College Orchestra will perform on Saturday, April 28, at 8 p.m. They will be joined by student soloists who recently won the concerto competition at the college. Darcy Ogden '01 will be the soloist for "Poem for Flute and Orchestra" by Charles Griffes, Aaron Butler '02 will be the soloist for the Piano Concerto no.2, op.40 by Felix Mendelssohn and Tony Xu '01 will be the soloist for the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto no.2, op.18. Lanfranco Marcelletti will conduct; Miriam Teitel '00 is the assistant director.

The Tsrema String Quartet will perform on Saturday, May 5, at 3 p.m. featuring works by Brahms, Shostakovitch and Lewis Spratlan, the Peter R. Pouncey Professor of Music at Amherst. Spratlan won the Pulitzer Prize last year for his opera, "Life is a Dream."

The chamber groups of the orchestra will perform on Tuesday, May 8, at 8 p.m. The program will include the Overture "La Peri" for brass ensemble by Dukas, the Sinfonia for Winds by Donizetti, the Symphony no. 32 of Mozart, the Bach Brandenburg Concerto no. 6 with Stephen Ruckman '01, David Abramowicz '01 and Jonathan Min '01 as soloists, and the Brahms Violin Sonata.

Lanfranco Marcelletti received advanced degrees from the Yale University School of Music and is the director of instrumental music at Amherst.

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Amherst College Faculty and Students Report on Recent Trip to Cuba April 24

April 19, 2001
Director of Media
Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—During their Spring Break in March, 18 Amherst College students, two professors and two staff members traveled to Cuba as part of an educational delegation. The group will discuss their 10-day visit, the trade embargo against Cuba and economic globalization on Tuesday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Karin Weyland, assistant professor of American Studies and sociology and anthropology, and several students will show the video documentary about their trip they have been preparing. The event is free and open to the public; refreshments will be served.

The members of the delegation, co-sponsored by Witness for Peace, a politically independent grassroots organization that works for social justice in Latin America, wanted to broaden their classroom perspective on Cuba by observing and engaging with a world radically different in its culture, economy and political system. In the months before the trip, they read extensively to familiarize themselves with the island, meeting weekly in a Special Topics class to discuss the questions raised by their studies.

In Cuba, the delegation met with Cuban citizens and visited schools, health clinics, agricultural cooperatives, factories, museums and government ministries, adding first-hand knowledge to the factual and theoretical base. A goal of the journey was to return and share the knowledge and personal growth gained with the Amherst community, promoting social engagement with issues of international relations, public health, public education and Cuban culture.

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Jon Hendricks, “Poet Laureate of Jazz,” Sings May 4

April 19, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Legendary jazz vocalist Jon Hendricks will appear on Friday, May 4 at 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall at Amherst College. Hendricks will be joined by his daughter Aria Hendricks, his new trio (Peter Mihelich on piano, Neal Miner on bass and Andy Watson on drums), the Amherst College Jazz Ensemble and composer, lyricist and pianist David Lahm (Amherst ’61.) The concert, free and open to the public, will celebrate Robin McBride’s gift to the college of a collection of more than 2000 jazz albums. McBride graduated from Amherst in 1959.

Jon Hendricks, born in 1920, has been called the “James Joyce of jive” by Time magazine and “the poet laureate of jazz” by jazz critic and historian Leonard Feather, for his ability to write songs that weave together different vocal parts. Hendricks began singing on the radio in his teens. In 1958 he, Annie Ross and Dave Lambert formed the trio Lambert, Hendricks and Ross.

Lambert, Hendricks and Ross toured and recorded all over the world, developing a repertoire of “vocalese,” a style of setting witty intricate lyrics to improvisational instrumental jazz solos and crafting swinging poetry. Their first recording was Sing Along With Basie (1958), which was just what they did: singing all the parts (except rhythm) to recreate with voices the big-band standards of Basie, Ellington and others.

Hendricks continued a solo and ensemble career, and was jazz critic for the San Francisco Chronicle. He taught music at California State University at Sonoma and the University of California at Berkeley. He has worked with Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Buck Clayton, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Wynton Marsalis and Bobby McFerrin, and his 1985 album Vocalese won five Grammy Awards. In recent years Hendricks has been singing again with Annie Ross.

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Paul Farmer To Speak About “Pathologies of Power” April 28

April 19, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass. - Paul Farmer, professor of social medicine at Harvard University Medical School and director of the Clinique Bon Sauveur in Haiti, will discuss "Pathologies of Power: Rethinking Health and Human Rights in the Global Era," on Saturday, April 28, at 10:30 a.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College.

Farmer will argue for research and action grounded in the struggle for social and economic rights. He believes that future progress in human rights will be linked to the equitable distribution of the fruits of scientific advancement.

In addition to his teaching and clinical work in Haiti, Farmer is the director of the Program in Infectious Disease and Social Change at Harvard and the co-director of Partners in Health, an international organization that brings medical care to the world's poor people. He has written several works of medical anthropology, including Infections and Inequalities (1999). His research interests include health and human rights, infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and HIV, and community-based control of infectious diseases. Farmer was profiled recently in the New Yorker in an article called "The Good Doctor."

Pastries, coffee and tea before the lecture and a light luncheon afterward will be provided by the Black Sheep Bakery. The event is organized by the Religious Advisors at Amherst College and sponsored by the Schwemm Fund and is free and open to the public.

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Political Scientist Dumm Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

April 19, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Thomas Dumm, professor of political science at Amherst College, has been named a Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The foundation will support his research on loneliness and experience for the 12-month period beginning in September 2001. Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded on the basis of past accomplishment and future promise as a scholar, writer and artist.

Dumm is the author of four books that have explored the relationship of punishment to the origins of American democracy, different aspects of contemporary American political culture, and poststructuralist political theory. His most recent book is A Politics of the Ordinary (NYU Press, 1999). He finishes his term as founding editor of Theory&Event, an internationally juried journal of contemporary political theory, in December of this year. Theory&Event was first published in 1997, and was at its founding the first exclusively online humanities journal published by a major university press (Johns Hopkins University Press, Project MUSE). It currently is carried by several thousand libraries worldwide.

Dumm will be engaged in research and will present lectures in London, England; Melbourne, Canberra and Sydney, Australia; and Pelican Bay, Calif. in the coming year.

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“The Growing Multicultural World” April 22 to 29

April 19, 2001
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass. - The Students of Mixed Heritage at Amherst College (SMHAC) will present a multimedia display of "The Growing Multicultural World," in the Keefe Campus Center Atrium from Sunday, April 22 to Sunday, April 29. The Campus Center is open daily from 9 a.m. until 2 a.m.; admission is free.

This display of biographical sketches, photographs, statistics, and literature about people of mixed race, culture and ethnicity at Amherst College, and also in the mass media, is designed to help bring about a greater awareness and understanding of the mixed heritage experience.

Jasmine E. Lee, an Amherst College junior who chairs the SMHAC, says that "the photographs should attract people, but then we hope they learn something by reading the words."

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