Amherst College To Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.in February

January 17, 2002
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College has scheduled three special events in early February for the college’s annual celebration of the life of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The first will be a musical exploration of the African-American experience performed by “Return to the Source” (RTS), a popular group headed by an Amherst College alumnus, Junius Williams ’65. RTS is a vocal and instrumental ensemble specializing in the history and performance of African-American music, and its repertory includes spirituals, blues, jazz, gospel and popular music. The group will perform at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 1, in the Frontroom of the Keefe Campus Center.

Featured speakers as the annual Interfaith Service commemorating the life and works of Dr. King in Johnson Chapel at 2 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, will be the celebrated “God Squad” duo of Msgr. Thomas Hartman and Rabbi Marc Gellman. Known for their frequent appearances on ABC’s television program “Good Morning America” and in other media, the two discuss religion—especially their own Roman Catholic and Jewish faiths—in an irreverent but positive manner. They were well received at the college’s MLK service several years ago and are making a return appearance.

The third event will be a talk titled “We’re All in the Same Gang,” delivered in Johnson Chapel at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7, by the prominent Latino film and TV actor, producer, director and activist Edward James Olmos. Among his many credits, Olmos has starred in such films as Blade Runner and Selena. He received a Golden Globe Award for his work in HBO’s The Burning Season, the story of the Brazilian political activist Chico Mendes. He also received both an Emmy and a Golden Globe Award for his portrayal of Lt. Castillo on the TV series “Miami Vice.”

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Amherst College Police Chief John Carter Named President of State Organization

January 15, 2002
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-John B. Carter, chief of campus police at Amherst College, has been named president of the Massachusetts Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (MACLEA), to serve out a term ending in June. He had been serving as vice president.

Carter, a resident of Ashby, Mass., became chief of campus police at Amherst College in 1998. He received a B.S. in criminal justice from the University of Lowell and an M.S. in the same subject from Fitchburg State College. Carter was an officer for the Townsend, Mass., Police Department from 1986 to 1990. He then served with the Brandeis University Police, first as sergeant and then as detective sergeant, until his appointment at Amherst.

MACLEA was founded nearly 25 years ago with the mission of promoting "the common interest in the administration of law enforcement programs...on college and university campuses."The association currently has about 80 active members from both public and private schools in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

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Amherst Physicist Jonathan Friedman Receives Cottrell College Science Award

January 15, 2002
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Research Corporation has presented Amherst College with a Cottrell College Science Award worth $36, 604 in support of assistant physics professor Jonathan R. Friedman's "Investigation of resonant magnetization tunneling in molecular magnets via transverse-field AC susceptibility" project. Friedman received one of only 20 awards; Amherst College has received two Cottrell Science Awards in the past two years.

Friedman studies the property of "tunneling," which enables single-molecule magnets to reverse polar direction even when there is not enough thermal energy to allow the process to happen classically. Using the new grant, he will to try to control this tunneling process through the application of a transverse magnetic field, a field perpendicular to the North-South axis of the magnet. Applying this field should increase the rate at which the molecules flip direction.

After receiving a B.A. from Vassar College and a Ph.D. in physics from City College of New York, Friedman came to Amherst in 2001. He is perhaps best known for his work with colleagues at SUNY-Stony Brook on a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Their SQUID was the first example on a macroscopic scale of a "quantum superposition," a state in which an object can be in each of two states at the same time.

The Cottrell College Science Award is meant to support significant fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry and physics done by both faculty and students. It is one of several awards given by Research Corporation, a private foundation that aids basic research in the physical sciences at U.S. and Canadian colleges and universities. It supports ideas independently proposed by college and university faculty members and is not itself involved in the performance of laboratory research. The Research Corporation has a Web site at http://www.rescorp.org/.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu