Keepers of the Word Storytellers at Amherst College April 26

April 10, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Storytellers from across the country will spin their tales at the 11th annual Keepers of the Word Storytelling Festival, a day-long event on Saturday, April 26, in the Keefe Campus Center Frontroom at Amherst College. Performances are scheduled for 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.

This year's nationally known storytellers are Onawumi Jean Moss, Dan Keding, Charlotte Blake Alston, Antonio Rocha and Brenda Wong Aoki.
Onawumi Jean Moss, founder and director of the Keepers of the Word Storytelling Festival, is associate dean of students at Amherst College. With original stories, fairy tales, cautionary tales, folk tales and personal narratives she encourages appreciation of cultural differences, pride of heritage, recognition of kinship, reflection and inquiry. Her soulful narration, a capella singing, dramatic facial expressions and animated movements bring to life the worlds of adventurous girls and women, charming creatures, scheming tricksters and wicked demons.

Dan Keding of Urbana, Ill. is an educator, writer, recording artist and award-winning storyteller. Charlotte Blake Alston of Philadelphia is a storyteller, educator, singer, writer and recording artist. Antonio Rocha of Niteroi, Brazil, is a mime and storyteller. Brenda Wong Aoki of San Francisco is a storyteller, educator, writer, dancer and recording artist.

There will be three ensemble performances at the festival: "Stories for Little Folk and the People Who Love Them" from 10 to 11:30 a.m., "Stories for Young Folk and the People Who Love Them" from 2 to 4 p.m., and "Stories for Older Folk and the People Who Love Them" from 8 to 10 p.m.

General admission for adults is $7 for the 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. performances and $12 for the 8 p.m. performance. Tickets for children under 12 and senior citizens are $5 for morning or evening, and $7 for evening. A special rate of $11 for adults and $8 for children is available to those who wish to attend both the morning and afternoon performances. Advance tickets are available for each performance at the Keefe Campus Center Office. The performances are free to Amherst College students with I.D. For information call 413/542-2619.

Keepers of the Word is sponsored by the Association of Amherst Students, Office of the Dean of Students, academic departments and supporters throughout Amherst College.

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Lazerowitz Lecturer Catherine A. Ciepiela To Speak on the Poetry of Marina Tsvetaeva and Boris Pasternak at Amherst College Apri

April 10, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Catherine A. Ciepiela, associate professor of Russian at Amherst College, will give the annual Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lecture, on "A Sublime Malady (On the Poetry of Marina Tsvetaeva and Boris Pasternak)," on Tuesday, April 22, at 4:30 p.m. in the Alumni House at Amherst College. The talk is free and open to the public, as is a reception immediately following.

Ciepiela, a scholar of Russian poetry, is writing a book about the creative exchange between Tsvetaeva and Pasternak, which she calls The Same Solitude. She argues that their relationship reveals much about the poetics and politics of 20th-century Russian romanticism.

Ciepiela has been teaching at Amherst since 1989. She received a B.A. with an interdisciplinary major from Amherst in 1983. She earned M.A and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, and has received Yale University, Sterling Prize, National Endowment for the Humanities and Mellon fellowships.

The Lazerowitz Lectureship is awarded each year to support and encourage members of the Amherst College faculty in their scholarly work. The Dean of the Faculty, in conjunction with the Lecture Committee, selects the recipient, a member of the faculty below the rank of a full professor, who presents a lecture on his or her research.

The Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lectureship was established in 1985 to honor the parents of the late Morris Lazerowitz, emeritus professor of philosophy at Smith College.

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Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams To Speak at Amherst College April 10

April 10, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Jody Williams, a founder of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), will speak about land mines and international affairs on Thursday, April 10, at 4 p.m. in Johnson Chapel at Amherst College. Williams and the ICBL received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for their work. Her talk, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Corliss Lamont Lectureship for a Peaceful World, the Association of Amherst Students, the departments of political science and women's and gender studies and the Office of the President at Amherst College.

When the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize was announced in 1997, the Nobel Committee said that Williams and the ICBL had transformed the ban on these deadly and unforgiving weapons from "a vision to a feasible reality." It also noted that by working with smaller countries, "this work has grown into a convincing example of an effective policy for peace that could prove of decisive importance to the international effort for disarmament."

The New York Times found Williams that day at her home in Putney, Vt. "Barefoot in her rustic yard here, and bare-knuckled as ever in her approach, Ms. Williams taunted President Clinton… saying he would be branded a coward if the United States continued to refuse to sign the international treaty banning land mines. 'If President Clinton wants the legacy of his administration to be that he did not have the courage to be the Commander in Chief of his military, that is his legacy, and I feel sorry for him,' she said. 'I think it's tragic that President Clinton does not want to be on the side of humanity.'" The United States has not yet signed the treaty.

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U.N. General Assembly President Jan Kavan To Speak at Amherst College April 16

April 10, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, MASS. -Jan Kavan, the president of the United Nations General Assembly, will deliver a lecture on "Managing the Iraq Crisis: The U.N.'s Role-Past, Present and Future" on Wed., April 16, at 7:30 p.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. His talk, sponsored by the office of the President and the political science department at Amherst, is free and open to the public.

A lifelong advocate of democracy and human rights, Kavan served as the Czech Republic's minister of foreign affairs from 1998 until 2002. He is currently a deputy in the Czech Parliament. He spent 20 years in exile in Great Britain after being blacklisted by the Communist Party for his leading role in protesting the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. During this period, he founded Palach Press, the press agency in the West for promoting the activities of the Czech opposition movements. Kavan also founded and edited the East European Reporter, a quarterly whose editorial board included Vaclav Havel and Adam Michnik. Kavan's most recent publication, "McCarthyism has a New Name: Lustration, the Transition to Democracy in Eastern Europe and Russia," was published just last year in the U.S. The recipient of numerous awards for his contribution to the struggle for human rights and democracy, Kavan has also lectured widely at many American universities. During the 1993-94 academic year, he was the Karl Loewenstein Fellow in Politics and Jurisprudence at Amherst College.

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Writer Sue Miller To Read at Amherst College April 28

April 10, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Novelist Sue Miller, a visiting writer at Amherst College, will read from her work at 8 p.m. on Monday, April 28, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at the college. The event, sponsored by the Amherst College Creative Writing Center and the F. Scott Turow Fund, is free and open to the public and will be followed by refreshments.

Miller is the author of five novels that have been been beloved by readers and critics alike. As Publisher's Weekly put it, "Miller limns contemporary life in deft, sure strokes, with an unerring ear for the way parents and children talk; no one can parse a modern marriage as well as she can." And in a rave New York Times review, William Pritchard said, "Miller has never written better about love and lust."

Miller's most recent book, The Story of My Father: A Memoir, an account of a parent's affliction with Alzheimer's, will be published in March of this year by Knopf.

Miller lives and writes in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and currently teaches fiction at Amherst College. The Amherst College Creative Writing Center puts on a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. See the Center's Website, http://www.amherst.edu/~cwc, for more information.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu