Amherst College Senior Jordan Lang Awarded Fulbright Fellowship

May 8, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Jordan Lang, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in the Netherlands. Lang will study the International Criminal Court and its place in European-American relations in the International School for Humanities and Social Science at the University of Amsterdam. Lang is the son of Robert and Maxyne Lang of New York.

"Europe and America stand at a crossroads," Lang wrote in his application, "and the recent debate surrounding the International Criminal Court has become a lightning rod for European-American relations."

Lang plans to explore how the long era of trans-Atlantic cooperation that followed the Second World War ended with the end of the Cold War, asking questions such as, "Does Europe see the United States as a loyal ally, or a nation preventing Europe from standing on its own? What are the similarities and differences between European and American world views?" American nonparticipation in the ICC-based in The Hague-offers concrete answers.

A major in law, jurisprudence and social thought and political science at Amherst, Lang wrote a column for The Indicator, a college magazine, was a board member of the Foreign Policy Forum, and treasurer of the Spanish Language House. He was also active in the Parliamentary Debate Society and intramural squash at Amherst and medieval court tennis during his junior year at Oxford University. He plans a career in international law.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government's premier scholarship program, funded by an annual congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in over 100 nations.

Lang is one of five Amherst seniors who received Fulbright grants this year.

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Amherst College Senior Megan Christine Lau Awarded Fulbright Fellowship

May 8, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Megan Christine Lau, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in Japan. Lau will study traditional Japanese theater in Osaka. Lau is the daughter of Wanda and Willis Lau of Agoura Hills, Calif.

In her application, Lau wrote "the audience is as much a part of Japanese theater as the actors." The spectators are "unabashed at arriving late, eating and talking loudly, or snoring soundly." This traditional "rudeness" makes a performance in Japan unique: "To experience Japanese theater fully is to watch a play with a Japanese audience."

Lau plans to read English and modern Japanese translations of traditional works, and eventually to write a translation, an adaptation or a new play on her own. She also will continue her study of the Japanese language as she reads newspaper reviews and discusses plays and performances with theatergoers. Osaka University, within play-going distance of Tokyo and Kyoto, is one of the few universities in Japan where Japanese theater is studied formally.

Lau, a math and English major at Amherst, received the Denis Johnston Playwriting Prize and the James Baldwin Playwriting Award for her work. She was one of the founders of Amherst Group Theatre, a student troupe. Lau also won the Porter Prize in Astronomy and has been president and secretary of the Asian Culture House.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government's premier scholarship program, funded by an annual congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in over 100 nations.

Lau is one of five Amherst seniors who received Fulbright grants this year.

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Amherst College Sophomore Allison Campbell Awarded Goldwater Scholarship

May 8, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Allison Campbell, a sophomore at Amherst College, will receive a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for study next year. A graduate of Skyline High School, she is the daughter of James and Kristine Campbell of Salt Lake City, Utah. Only 300 Goldwater Scholarships were awarded to undergraduate sophomores and juniors in the United States this year.

Campbell is interested in the study of infectious diseases. Her work at Amherst-especially with Patrick Williamson, Edward H. Harkness Professor of Biology-has already involved protein structure. As a high school student, Campbell began studying Parkinson's disease in laboratories at the University of Utah. She spent the summer of 2002 at the University, one of five undergraduates selected to pursue pharmacology by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. In January 2003, she continued her work at the University of Utah, researching techniques for amplifying small samples of genetic material.

A biology major, Campbell has worked on the Amherst College Emergency Medical Services team, and also has been part of the Isshin-Ryu Karate Club, the Amherst Equestrian Team and the Ballroom Dance Club at Amherst.

The U.S. Congress authorized the Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program in 1986. Faculty members nominate students, and awards are made on the basis of academic merit to outstanding sophomores and juniors who plan to pursue careers in science, mathematics or engineering. Each scholarship covers expenses for tuition, fees, books, room and board, for as much as $7,500 annually.

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Amherst College Sophomore Jiovani Visaya Awarded Goldwater Scholarship

May 8, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Jiovani Visaya, a sophomore at Amherst College, will receive a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for study next year. A graduate of Regis High School in New York, he is the son of Jesus and Teresita Visaya of Lynbrook, N.Y. Only 300 Goldwater Scholarships were awarded to undergraduate sophomores and juniors in the United States this year.

Visaya is interested in studying what he calls "the therapeutic side of biochemical research," combining his interests in biology and chemistry to discover biotechnological approaches to modern diseases and disorders. To that end, he plans eventually to enter the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry. He also studies economics and computer science.

Last summer, Visaya studied antibody catalysis at Amherst with chemistry professor David Hansen, as a fellow of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He continued that research at Amherst in January.

Visaya, whose majors are chemistry and biology, has worked on the Amherst College Emergency Medical Services team, and also been part of the Newman Club and the Pacific Islander/South East Asian Students Association at Amherst.

The U.S. Congress authorized the Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program in 1986. Faculty members nominate students, and awards are made on the basis of academic merit to outstanding sophomores and juniors who plan to pursue careers in science, mathematics or engineering. Each scholarship covers expenses for tuition, fees, books, room and board, for as much as $7,500 annually.

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Physician and Writer Sherwin B. Nuland To Speak at Amherst College May 7

May 1, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Sherwin B. Nuland, author of Lost in America: A Journey With My Father (2003), will give the first annual "Salute to Families" lecture on Wednesday, May 7, at 7:30 p.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. His talk is sponsored by the Amherst College Creative Writing Center and Family Outreach of Amherst. Proceeds from the talk and book signing will benefit Family Outreach. Admission to the benefit lecture is $10 general admission, and $25 for benefactors. A reception with the author will follow. For reservations, call 413/253-0154.

Winner of the National Book Award in 1994 for How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter, Nuland is clinical professor of surgery at Yale, where he also teaches bioethics and medical history. A native of New York City, Nuland in his new book offers an intensive look at his relationship with his father, Meyer Nudelman, an immigrant who never assimilated into the new American culture. Lost in America traces the father's alienation, his debilitating physical ailments and the deep emotional traumas inflicted on his relationship with his son. Ultimately, Nuland discovered that his father had tertiary syphilis, and had to deal with the shock and shame that such a revelation entailed. Nuland himself fell into a deep depression in his 30s and narrowly escaped being lobotomized. "Written with enormous empathy, yet without a hint of sentimentality, Nuland's memoir is both heartbreaking and breathtaking," according to Publisher's Weekly.

Family Outreach of Amherst is a private, nonprofit agency dedicated to helping Amherst families in need.

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Tom Gerety, Departing Amherst College President, To Lead Brennan Center for Justice In New York

May 1, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-The board of directors of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law today announced the appointment of departing Amherst College President Tom Gerety as executive director. Gerety will complete a nine-year tenure as president of Amherst College on June 30, 2003.

"This is urgent work," said Gerety. "When faced with external threats, the American republic has always had to struggle to maintain a democracy that is open and energetic, reflecting the diverse voices and interests of our nation. The Brennan Center for Justice fights to uphold America's ideals of equality, liberty and generosity to all. It's a great time to join in this good work."

Gerety also has received a university-wide academic appointment at NYU; he will be the Brennan Center for Justice Professor.

The Brennan Center is a new type of public interest institution, incorporating elements of a public-interest law firm, a think tank and an advocacy organization. Founded in 1995, the Center brings together thinkers and advocates in pursuit of a vision of inclusive and effective democracy. With a staff that has grown from two to 40 in the past eight years, the Center engages in three programs: Criminal Justice, Democracy and Poverty. The Center has been instrumental in enacting and legally defending the McCain-Feingold law, the first comprehensive federal campaign finance reform in a generation. The Center also was key in a 2001 Supreme Court decision striking down a law that barred legal aid lawyers from challenging welfare laws.
William J. Brennan, III, chair of the Brennan Center Board, noted, "With his experience as a legal scholar, a social justice advocate, and president of a premier liberal arts college, Tom Gerety possesses all the talents needed to advance the Center's mission."

Richard L. Revesz, dean of the NYU Law School, said, "Tom Gerety will be a spectacular leader for the Brennan Center. He will be able to capture the synergies available to the Center from its relationship with NYU School of Law, bringing together the best academics, policy analysts and litigators to address our nation's pressing social problems."

Gerety said, "We're in this fight with lots of others. We need strong allies and friends. So it's essential to work closely with others who care about these issues - about civil rights, about the poor and their advocates, about the promise of democracy. I look forward to working with the Center's great staff, with the Board, and with the NYU faculty at the Law School and throughout the University. Particularly important colleagues are the many experienced and devoted people around the country - in advocacy groups, service agencies and foundations - who stand shoulder to shoulder with us in all that we do."

As Amherst's president, Gerety worked to strengthen the college's admission standards and increase the diversity of its student body. Approximately 35 percent of the first-year class is composed of students of color. Amherst has retained its commitment to need-blind admission; more than half of Amherst's students receive some form of financial aid.

Over the past nine years, Amherst's endowment nearly tripled, from $332 million to nearly a billion dollars. The Amherst College Campaign exceeded its goal, with nearly $270 million in gifts and pledges to support faculty and academic programs, financial aid and student programs, facilities and the endowment. Most of the college's academic and athletic buildings have been renovated in the past six years; a new Life Sciences Building opened in 1996, and a new Experimental Theater was constructed in 1998. Amherst has begun construction on new dormitories and major renovations of several existing dorms. Amherst is also engaged in a broad evaluation of the academic life of the college through the Special Committee on the Amherst Education.

Gerety has been a leader in several national education organizations, serving as chair of the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, a group of the nation's best private universities and colleges. He has served as president of Five Colleges, Inc. A frequent commentator on issues related to education and to human rights, he has served for 14 years on the board of the International Rescue Committee. This spring, he organized private colleges in a "friend of the court" brief supporting the affirmative action policies of the University of Michigan.
At Amherst, he was a professor of philosophy and taught a First-Year Seminar on "Inner City America," in which students volunteer at social service agencies in Amherst and Holyoke. Locally, under his leadership, Amherst has established a partnership with El Arco Iris, a multicultural community arts center in Holyoke, and has begun working with the local Habitat for Humanity chapter on using Amherst College land for a Habitat project. Gerety has established Fellowships for Action to encourage Amherst students to become involved with community or human services work in the U.S. and abroad, and he has been a leading voice in local United Way discussions.

From 1989 to 1994, Gerety was president of Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. While there, he turned the college decisively toward its inner-city environment and helped develop the strategic plans for magnet schools and other city-suburban collaborations that Trinity maintains today.

Before assuming the presidency at Trinity, Gerety was dean of the College of Law at the University of Cincinnati. Earlier, he was a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh and a visiting professor of constitutional law and jurisprudence at Stanford Law School.
Gerety holds a J.D. from Yale Law School. He also earned doctorate and masters degrees in philosophy from Yale.

At the Brennan Center, Gerety succeeds E. Joshua Rosenkranz, who helped found the Center in 1995 and who is responsible for building the Center to its present form. The Center's mission is to develop and implement an innovative, nonpartisan agenda of scholarship, public education and legal action that promotes equality and human dignity while safeguarding fundamental freedoms.

The Brennan Center's Website is http://www.brennancenter.org/.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu