Amherst Professor Nasser Hussain Considers Law and Emergency in New Book

September 30, 2003
Director of Media Relations
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AMHERST, Mass.- In his new book, The Jurisprudence of Emergency ($59.50, 192 pp., University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 2003), Nasser Hussain analyzes the historical uses of a host of emergency powers, ranging from the suspension of habeas corpus to the use of military tribunals. Hussain is an assistant professor of law, jurisprudence and social thought at Amherst College.

Focusing on the relationship between "emergency" and the law to develop a subtle new theory of those moments in which the normative rule of law is suspended, Hussain begins by examining British colonial rule in India from the late 18th to the early 20th century. He argues that the interaction of competing ideologies-liberty and government by law versus the colonizer's insistence on a regime of conquest-exemplifies a conflict central to all Western legal systems: between the universal, rational operation of law on the one hand and the absolute sovereignty of the state on the other. In this new light, the colonies could be seen as influential agents in the interpretation and delineation of Western ideas and practices.

Hussain graduated from Yale University and has both an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Before coming to Amherst, he was a fellow with the Harvard University Society of Fellows.

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Poet Honor Moore To Read at Amherst College Oct. 29

September 30, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- The poet and biographer Honor Moore will read from her work at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 29, in Porter Lounge in Converse Hall at Amherst College. The event, sponsored by the Amherst College Creative Writing Center, is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Moore has published two collections of poetry, Memoir and Darling, and The White Blackbird, a biography of her grandmother, the painter Margarett Sargent. In her poetry, Moore explores such topics as longing and death with a visual precision: a woman's hair is the color of raw wood; a dead friend is remembered by how he placed objects in a room; two lovers "fall together like answers." The Boston Review has described Moore's poetry as "blunt and brave," and praised her "unique ability to infuse her poems with real body heat, emotional electricity, and the divine grief at the center of desire."

Moore's poems have appeared in many publications, including The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Open City, Conjunctions and American Poetry Review. Her essays have appeared in such publications as The New Yorker and The New York Times.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center puts on a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors; its Website is at www.amherst.edu/~cwc.

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Amherst College Professor Martha Sandweiss Receives William P. Clements Prize

September 23, 2003
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AMHERST, Mass.-The Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University has given the 2002 William P. Clements Prize to Martha A. Sandweiss, professor of American studies and history at Amherst College, for Print the Legend: Photography and the American West, a cultural history of photography in the American West during the 19th century that tracks how the new medium of photography created and shaped popular understanding of the region.

The Clements Prize is given annually to the best non-fiction work about southwestern America. The prize committee noted that in Sandweiss's "richly illustrated new book, she tells the intertwined stories of photography and the American West-a new medium and a new place that came of age together in the nineteenth century." Michael Kammen, in Reviews in American History, wrote, "Sandweiss has given us a truly remarkable book, written with clarity and grace, and superbly illustrated with many unfamiliar images and shrewd juxtapositions of photographs and the more fanciful lithographs that embellished them."

A member of the Amherst College faculty since 1989, Sandweiss was also the director of the Mead Art Museum from 1989 until 1997, and formerly the curator of photographs at the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Tex. She received her Ph.D., M.Phil. and M.A. degrees in history from Yale University, and a B.A. from Radcliffe College. She is the author of Laura Gilpin: An Enduring Grace (1986), co-author of Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848 (1989), editor of Photography in Nineteenth-Century America (1991), co-editor of The Oxford History of the American West (1994) and a contributor to numerous volumes on the art and photography of the American West.

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Amherst College Professor Natasha Staller's "Sum of Destructions" a Finalist For Charles Rufus Morey Book Award 29

September 23, 2003
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AMHERST, Mass.-Natasha Staller, associate professor of fine arts at Amherst College and author of A Sum of Destructions: Picasso's Cultures and the Creation of Cubism, was a finalist for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award, which honors an especially distinguished book in the history of art, of any period, in any language. Staller's book is a study of the historical and cultural antecedents that the dominant painter of the 20th century recreated. The book is the first study of "the degree to which revolutionary Cubism was saturated with Picasso's past."

A Sum of Destructions portrays Picasso as a thoroughly modern artist on a resolutely traditional quest: "Struggling to make sense of experience," Staller writes, "to make meaning, to make beauty-even as he redefined what was beautiful-goes to the core of what it means to be human."

Staller, educated at Wellesley College (A.B.) and Harvard University (Ph.D.), has taught at Amherst since 1992, after teaching at Princeton University and the University of Chicago. She has had fellowships at Harvard (Society of Fellows), Yale (Getty Fellowship/ Whitney Humanities Center), the University of Pennsylvania (Mellon Fellowship) and Radcliffe College (Bunting Institute.) Working on The Sum of Destructions for more than 20 years, Staller has lectured on Picasso's cultural heritage in museums and universities, and published parts of the book in Arts Magazine, Art Bulletin, Art History and the catalog of Picasso: The Early Years (1997), an exhibition at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

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Anne-Marie Slaughter to Speak at Amherst College Oct. 16

September 23, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Anne-Marie Slaughter, the John J. McCloy '16 Professor of American Institutions and International Relations at Amherst College and dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, will deliver a lecture on "A New World Order: Part I," on Thursday, Oct. 16, at 4:30 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium at Amherst College. The event will be free and open to the public.

Slaughter, a highly regarded expert on international law, previously served as director of graduate and international legal studies at the Harvard Law School and was founder and faculty director of the Harvard Colloquium on International Affairs. She has taught at the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a professor of law and international relations. Her teaching and research have focused on global governance, the politics of international tribunals, and interdisciplinary analyses of international legal issues. An author or co-editor of four books and more than 50 articles, and a frequent commentator in the media, Slaughter is president of the American Society of International Law and has worked to establish jurisdiction principles for war crimes. Educated at Princeton University, Oxford University and Harvard Law School, Slaughter has received numerous honors for her work.

The John J. McCloy '16 Professorship was established at Amherst College in 1983 to honor John J. McCloy and his outstanding career of service and accomplishment in American politics and international diplomacy. Slaughter will deliver the second McCloy lecture in the spring. Slaughter's visit is hosted by Beth Yarbrough, Willard Long Thorp Professor of Economics at Amherst College.

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Amherst College Computer Scientist John Rager Receives Fulbright Scholarship

September 22, 2003
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AMHERST, Mass.- John Rager, a professor of computer science at Amherst College, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture in Chisinau, Moldova during the 2003-04 academic year, according to the United States Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

Rager will teach artificial intelligence, programming languages, and computer graphics at the Academia de Studii Economice in Moldova. In addition, he will lecture at various other academic institutions in Moldova.

Rager is one of approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad to some 140 countries for the 2003-04 academic year through the Fulbright Scholar Program. Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program's purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

The Fulbright Program, America's flagship international educational exchange activity, is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Over its 57 years of existence, thousands of U.S. faculty and professionals have studied, taught or done research abroad, and thousands of their counterparts from other countries have engaged in similar activities in the U.S. They are among more than 250,000 American and foreign university students, K-12 teachers and university faculty and professionals who have participated in one of the several Fulbright exchange programs.

Recipients of Fulbright Scholar awards are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields.

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Amherst College Senior Luke Swarthout Elected to National Leadership in USPIRG

September 22, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Luke Swarthout '04 has been elected vice-chair and treasurer of the United States Public Interest Research Group (USPIRG), the national lobbying arm of the state PIRGs. Swarthout, a history major at Amherst, is the son of Lorne Swarthout and Joan Richter of New York City.

A member of the Amherst College chapter of the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (MASSPIRG) since his freshman year, Swarthout was elected to chair the National Student Forum of USPIRG in April. His local, statewide, national and international lobbying efforts include attendance at the 2001 and 2002 Annual General Meeting of British Petroleum in London, where he urged the oil company not to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. He currently is working on project aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Massachusetts. "I'm honored by my election as Vice-Chair of USPIRG," Swarthout says, "but my focus remains squarely on organizing students at Amherst College and across the state of Massachusetts around public interest issues such as poverty and the environment."

MASSPIRG was founded in 1972 by students at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and has a 30-year history of environmental advocacy. Over the past three years Amherst College MASSPIRG students have registered hundreds of Amherst students to vote, raised thousands of dollars for local hunger and homelessness efforts and pulled hundreds of bags of garbage from local rivers, lakes and streams.

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Artist Joseph Ablow To Speak at Amherst College Oct. 2

September 22, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Painter Joseph Ablow, artist in residence at Amherst College, will speak in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (115 Fayerweather) at the college on Thursday, October 2, at 4:30 p.m. A reception will follow. The artist's talk marks the opening of "Joseph Ablow: A Retrospective," which will be on display in the Eli Marsh Gallery in Fayerweather Hall from Oct. 2 until Nov. 2.

Ablow, represented by the Pucker Gallery in Boston (www.puckergallery.com), was born in Salem, Mass. After receiving a B.A. from Bennington College and an A.M. degree from Harvard University, Ablow studied painting at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He continued his instruction in painting with Oskar Kokoschka and Ben Shahn, among others. In addition to his work as a painter, Ablow has been a professor at Boston University for 35 years and has written many academic articles on art in the 20th century.

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Anthony Marx To Speak on "Nations and Exclusions" at Amherst College Sept. 30

September 16, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Professor Anthony W. Marx, president of Amherst College, will speak to first-year students about "Nations and Exclusions" on Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 4 p.m. in Johnson Chapel. The annual Croxton Fund Lecture is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and tickets are required. Tickets are distributed first to first-year students and faculty teaching first-year seminars at Amherst College; the remaining tickets will be available to other Amherst students, faculty and the public on a first-come-first-served basis on September 24 and 25 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Keefe Campus Center Atrium at Amherst College. There is a limit of two tickets to each person, and half the tickets will be distributed each day.

Marx, who began his tenure as Amherst's president on July 1, is a noted scholar of nationalism. His most recent book, Faith in Nation: Exclusionary Origins of Nationalism, was published this year; he is also the author of a dozen substantive articles and Lessons of Struggle: South African Internal Opposition, 1960-1990 (1992), and Making Race and Nation: A Comparison of the United States, South Africa and Brazil (1998). Making Race and Nation received the American Political Science Association's 1999 Ralph J. Bunche Award, for the best book on ethnic and cultural pluralism, and the American Sociological Association's 2000 Barrington Moore Prize, for the best book of the preceding three years in comparative-historical sociology.

Educated at Wesleyan and Yale, where he graduated magna cum laude in 1981, Marx received the M.P.A. degree from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University in 1986, then earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton in 1987 and 1990. He taught at Columbia University, where he received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1997, and served as director of the Columbia Urban Educators program.

The Croxton Lecture Fund was created in 1988 by William M. Croxton '36 in memory of his parents, Ruth L. and Hugh W. Croxton. Income from this fund is used to bring lecturers with substantial reputations to Amherst College for the purposes of educating Amherst students. A broad range of views will be represented by Croxton Lecturers.

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Poet Jay Wright To Read in Amherst College Creative Writing Center Series Sept. 29

September 16, 2003
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- The poet Jay Wright, described by John Hollander as "a brilliant and original poet" and in the Boston Review as "an unsung wonder of American poetry," will read from his work at 8 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 29, at Amherst Books, 8 Main Street in Amherst (413/256-1547). The event, co-sponsored by the Amherst College Creative Writing Center, is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Of Transfigurations, a book that collects all seven of Wright's previous volumes of poetry, Peter O'Leary writes, "I haven't felt so ennobled as a reader by a book of poetry since I started reading the genre. This book is utterly essential." Wright has defied characterization by experimenting with voices, languages, cultures and forms. Writing in The New York Times Book Review, Hollander described Wright's poetry as "powerfully concerned with roots-cultural, intellectual and spiritual." Wright says he has worked to record "my developing black African-American life in the United States, but I also saw that I had the beginning of forms to express lives that transcended that particular life." Transfigurations might be understood as an expression of that transcendence.

A resident of Vermont, Wright has received many awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a MacArthur Fellowship, and the Fellowship of the Academy of American poets.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center holds a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. See the Center's Website at www.amherst.edu/~cwc for more information.

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