Jack Turner To Give Kellogg Lecture at Amherst College March 22

March 17, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Jack Turner, a Ph.D. candidate in politics at Princeton University and a 1998 graduate of Amherst College, will speak on "Conscience and Action: Thoreau's Plea for John Brown," on Monday, March 22 at 4:30 p.m. in the Octagon at Amherst College. His talk is free and open to the public.

In 2000 Turner was the recipient of the Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship, one of the Amherst College Fellowships for graduate study, which is awarded for three years of graduate study to a recent graduate, and asks the recipient to return to campus to give a lecture or presentation.

After studying history, literature, and political theory at Amherst, Turner spent a year at King's College, University of Cambridge, England and earned an M.Phil. degree in political thought and intellectual history (2001) for his thesis, John Locke and Colonial America: The Cases of Virginia and New York, 1696-1700, supervised by Mark Goldie.

At Princeton University, where he received his M.A. degree in 2003, Turner expects to complete his Ph.D. dissertation, Democratic Individuality and the Trial of Racial Justice: A Study in American Political Thought, in 2006. He is working with Stephen Macedo and Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.

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Talk on The Dickinsons Of Amherst at Dickinson Museum April 3

March 17, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Writer Christopher Benfey and photographer Jerry Liebling will speak about The Dickinsons of Amherst at Saturday April 3 at 1 p.m. in the First Congregational Church (165 Main Street in Amherst). Benfey contributed, with Polly Longsworth and Barton Levi St. Armand, to the 2001 book The Dickinsons of Amherst that featured, according to The New York Times, Liebling's "romantic, ghost-filled photos of the Evergreens and the Dickinson Homestead." The talk is sponsored by The Emily Dickinson Museum.

Benfey, a professor of English at Mt. Holyoke College, is known as a Dickinson scholar. An art critic for the online magazine Slate and author of Degas in New Orleans (1997), Benfey also wrote The Double Life of Stephen Crane (1992) and Emily Dickinson and the Problem of Others (1984). His poems have appeared in the Paris Review and Ploughshares.

Jerome Liebling's work has been exhibited and collected at major museums and galleries through the United States as well as in Europe and Japan. He is the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships. Among his books of photographs are The Minnesota Photographs, 1949-69 (1997), The People, Yes (1995) and Jerome Liebling Photographs (1982). He has taught at the University of Minnesota, the State University of New York at New Paltz, Yale University and Hampshire College, where he is now Professor Emeritus.

Benfey and Liebling will speak as part of a series of events that will take place during the week of March 28 and April 3, in a program titled " 'A little Madness in the Spring': Celebrating History and Poetry at The Emily Dickinson Museum." For more information about this reading and the rest of the week's events at the Dickinson Museum, visit www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

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Amherst College Chemistry Professors Mark Marshall and Helen Leung Are Authors of Paper on Hydroxyl Radical Bond with Water

March 10, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Mark Marshall and Helen Leung, professors of chemistry at Amherst College, are among the authors of a recent paper that explored the bond between the hydroxyl radical (HO) and water (H2O). In a recent issue of Chemical & Engineering News it was reported that "Atmospheric chemists, in particular, find H2O-HO interesting, as the HO radical oxidizes organic pollutants and may also play a role in the chemistry of earth's ozone hole." "The hydroxyl radical is like nature's detergent," Marshall says. The research also demonstrates the intrinsically quantum mechanical nature of this species and provides evidence for the changes in the electronic environments of the molecules that signal the start of a chemical reaction.

Marshall and Leung study the detailed structure and dynamics of small molecules and chemical complexes. This research, first reported online in Chemical Physical Letters last December and appearing in print in January, examined the manner in which the extremely reactive hydroxyl radical (OH) interacts with potential reaction partners such as water. The hydroxyl radical, a powerful oxidant, is maligned for the damage it can cause in biological systems such as the human body, but is also capable of reactions that remove pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the atmosphere. Since water is ubiquitous in living things and in the atmosphere, chemists have speculated on the importance of the chemistry of an H2O-HO radical complex, in atmospheric science, genetics and other fields.

Leung received both B.S. and B.A. degrees from California State University, Northridge and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Leung has taught at Amherst since 2002. Marshall, a member of the Amherst College faculty since 1987, received a B.S. degree from the University of Rochester and Ph.D. from Harvard University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Research Council, in Ottawa, Canada.

The H. Axel Schupf '57 Fund for Intellectual Life supported Marshall during a sabbatical year at the University of Pennsylvania while he worked on this project. Both Leung and Marshall have received a Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. A National Science Foundation grant to Amherst College also supported the work.

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"Bad and Beautiful: Film Noir Songs" at Amherst College March 25

March 10, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Ann Maggs, vocalist, accompanied by pianist Eugene Uman, will present "Bad and Beautiful: Film Noir Songs" on Friday, March 25 at 12 noon in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. Free and open to the public, the concert will feature original music from the fatalistic films of the 40s and 50s.

A graduate of the University of Massachusetts and the University of Rhode Island, Maggs is the assistant music librarian at Amherst College where she teaches jazz voice. She teaches voice students and sings with a local 20-piece big band called the Heritage Pops Orchestra.

Director of the Vermont Jazz Center and professor of music at the Universidad de Antioquia and Universidad EAFIT in Colombia, Uman was formerly on the faculty at the 3rd Street Music Settlement House in New York and Colegio de Musica in Medellin, Colombia. He has recorded with Carlos Averhoff of Irakere as well as various Latin American ensembles.

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First International Spanglish Conference at Amherst College April 2-3

March 10, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-The first International Conference on Spanglish will be held at Amherst College on Friday and Saturday, April 2 and 3. Heard and spoken daily in the United States mass media, in culture high and low, Spanglish melds the Spanish and English languages in "a realm that cannot be bound by just one discipline," says Ilan Stavans, the Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture (Spanish) at Amherst and organizer of the conference. The academic discussions and cultural events at these two days of celebration and conversation are free and open to the public. The new Spanish-language newspaper for New England, El Globo, will make its debut at the conference.

Spanglish "invokes issues of identity and language, and it triggers reactions from the media, and also from the learned literary environments," Stavans says. "Our goal is to bring all these factors into one conference so the public can gain a better understanding of the reality of Spanglish. All the forces that are for it-and those that are against it."

Sessions in Spanglish linguistics, Spanglish media, Spanglish culture and Spanglish arts will be accented by performances of poetry and jazz music.

On Saturday, April 3, at 8:30 p.m., in Johnson Chapel, Paquito D' Rivera will perform. Cuban-born and classically trained, D' Rivera is "a gifted saxophonist and clarinetist [who] has became the man to call if you want a concert-hall presentation of Pan-Latin music," according to The New York Times. Puerto Rican vocalist Brenda Feliciano, a bilingual actress and interpreter of jazz and classical music, and Israeli pianist Alon Yavnai will join D' Rivera for this multicultural musical event.

On Friday, April 2 at 5:30 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium, Spanglish poet and novelist Giannina Braschi and poet and editor Tess O'Dwyer will read from The Mole and the Rat. Susan Chávez-Silverman will read from The Anniversary Chronicles on Saturday, April 3, at 2:30 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium.

The Spanglish conference will be the subject of a special supplement in El Globo, the new Spanish-language weekly newspaper. El Globo will address the Hispanic community in New England with in-depth analysis of world affairs and local news, commentary and opinion, features, arts and sports. The editors and publishers of El Globo will hold a press conference at Amherst College the weekend of April 2-3. Details will follow. More information, including a full schedule, is available at www.amherst.edu/~spanglish/.

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Alex Garvin To Speak on Rebuilding Manhattan after 9/11 at Amherst College March 21

March 9, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Alex Garvin will draw on his experience at the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation to speak on the role of politics, business and the public interest in the "Rebuilding of Lower Manhattan after 9/11" on Monday, March 21, at 4:30 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium at Amherst College. Sponsored by the President's Initiative Fund for the Urban Imagination and the Eastman Fund, Garvin's talk will be free and open to the public.

Garvin has combined a career in urban planning and real estate with teaching, architecture and public service. He currently serves as the managing director of planning for NYC2012, New York City's bid committee for the 2012 Olympic Games, and as president and chief executive officer of Alex Garvin and Associates. During 2002 and 2003, he was director of design and development at the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, the agency leading the rebuilding of the World Trade Center after September 11, 2001. Garvin teaches urban planning and architecture at Yale University and has published extensively on urban issues.

Please contact Nick Michlewicz at nmmichlewicz@amherst.edu for more information.

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Ruth W. Messinger To Speak at Amherst College March 31

March 9, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Ruth W. Messinger, former Manhattan borough president, president and executive director of American Jewish World Service (AJWS) and professor of urban policy and politics at Hunter College, will speak on Thursday, March 31, at 7:30 p.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Schwemm Fund, the talk, "Ruth Messinger Bears Witness: How Do We Respond?," will provide a firsthand account of the ongoing genocide in Sudan. The event is free and open to the public.

Born and raised in New York City, Messinger has been active in social justice through volunteerism and service work on the basis of the Jewish values of pursuing justice and healing the world. She was in public service in New York for 20 years, serving eight years as Manhattan borough president and running for mayor in 1997-the first woman to secure the Democratic Party's nomination. A member of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism and president of the Board of Surprise Lake Camp, a 100-year-old Jewish camp in New York, Messinger also sits on the boards of such organizations as the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women; Project Enterprise, a New York City micro-credit organization; and the Jericho Project, a residential drug rehabilitation program. The Forward, an American Jewish weekly newspaper, has named Messinger one of the 50 most influential Jews of the year three times.

AJWS provides aid, technical assistance and volunteers to grassroots groups in more than 35 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East, as well as 40 Jewish renewal projects in Russia and Ukraine. AJWS funds projects in health, education, agriculture, and development and human rights in underdeveloped countries.

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Amherst College Professor William Taubman Receives Literary Award

March 8, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- William C. Taubman, the Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science at Amherst College, has received the National Book Critics Circle Award for biography for Khrushchev: The Man and His Era (2003), the first comprehensive biography of the Soviet Communist leader, and the first of any Soviet leader to reflect the full range of sources that have become available since the U.S.S.R. collapsed. The National Book Critics Circle, founded in 1974, consists of literary critics from throughout the nation.

Khrushchev: The Man and His Era tells the story of both Khrushchev's personal triumphs and tragedy and those of his country. Drawing on newly opened archives in Russia and Ukraine, Taubman also has traveled to places where Khrushchev lived and worked, and interviewed Khrushchev family members, friends and colleagues.

Khrushchev rose from humble beginnings in a peasant village to Stalin's inner circle. He won a bitter battle to succeed Stalin in 1953, but was ignominiously ousted in 1964. Taubman's biography of Khrushchev combines historical narrative and political and psychological analysis.

Taubman, a member of the Amherst faculty since 1967, was educated at Harvard and Columbia Universities. An associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard, chair of the Advisory Committee of the Cold War International History Project at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. and an International Affairs Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations with the Department of State, Taubman is the author of many books. He wrote Moscow Spring (1989) with his wife Jane Taubman, a professor of Russian at Amherst College, Stalin's American Policy (1982), Governing Soviet Cities (1973) and The View from Lenin Hills (1967). He has contributed to The New York Times, Washington Post and Los Angeles Times, among many other newspapers, magazines and journals.

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A Play and Music of Emily Dickinson's Time at the Dickinson Museum April 3

March 5, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- "Always Going Back and Forth Between," the story of three Dickinson generations told in their own words, will be performed on Saturday, April 3 at 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church (165 Main Street in Amherst). The staged reading is sponsored by The Emily Dickinson Museum.

Compiled and edited by Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College, the dramatic reading includes the words of Edward and Emily Norcross Dickinson, the poet's parents; Austin and Lavinia Dickinson, the poet's siblings; her sister-in-law Susan Dickinson; the poet's nephews, Ned and Gilbert, and niece, Martha; Mabel Loomis Todd; as well as the poet herself. Readers assuming these historic roles are Doris Abramson, professor emeritus of theater at the University of Massachusetts; Mary Elizabeth Bernhard, independent scholar and Emily Dickinson Museum guide; Ellen Louise Hart, Dickinson scholar at the University of California at Santa Cruz; Bob Paquette from public radio station WFCR; Stan Rosenberg, state senator; Susan Snively, poet and the director of Amherst College Writing Center; Ellen Story, state representative from Amherst; and Dara Wier, poet and professor in the University of Massachusetts-Amherst MFA Program for Poets & Writers.

Musical interludes between readings will evoke music enjoyed by the Dickinson family. William Jordan will perform several piano pieces from the 19th century, and Diane Sanabria will perform on banjo, an instrument favored by the poet's nephew Ned.

The evening will conclude with a new song cycle based on Dickinson poems and composed by Willis Bridegam, a graduate of the Eastman School of Music and the librarian of Amherst College. The piece will be performed by soprano Anita Cooper, director of the Amherst Regional High School Chorale, and Grant Moss, organist at Smith College.

"Always" is the last in a series of events that will take place during the week of March 28 and April 3, in a program titled " 'A little Madness in the Spring': Celebrating History and Poetry at The Emily Dickinson Museum."

For more information about this reading and the rest of the week's events at the Dickinson Museum, visit www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

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Community Reading at Dickinson Museum March 31-April 3

March 5, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- In a series entitled "Can I expound upon the skies?" organizations, classes and other groups will engage in a community reading of all 1789 Emily Dickinson poems at The Dickinson Museum. The event will take place on Wednesday, March 31 from 12 noon until 6 p.m.; Thursday, April 1 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.; Friday, April 2 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.; and Saturday, April 3, from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.

The reading is sponsored by The Emily Dickinson Museum. Participating organizations include the Amherst Club, the Amherst Woman's Club, Amherst Writers and Artists, the Mead Art Museum, the National Yiddish Book Center, and departments from Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College and the University of Massachusetts.
The reading is part of a series of events that will take place during the week of March 28-April 3, in a program entitled " 'a little Madness in the Spring': Celebrating History and Poetry at The Emily Dickinson Museum." For more information about this and the rest of the week's events, visit www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu