Story of Emily Dickinson and Gilbert Dickinson at Dickinson Museum Event April 3

March 5, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Connie Ann Kirk, author and independent scholar, will give a lecture titled "'sweet velocity': The Story of Emily Dickinson and Her Young Nephew, Gilbert," on Saturday, April 3 at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church (165 Main Street in Amherst). The lecture is sponsored by The Emily Dickinson Museum.

The lecture celebrates the opening of the second story of The Evergreens' back ell. The Evergreens was home to Austin Dickinson, brother of poet Emily Dickinson, and his wife Susan Gilbert. A special feature of the newly opened second story is the nursery, where Austin and Susan's three children played.

Kirk, who specializes in Emily Dickinson, children's literature, American literature and creative writing, is the author of 10 published or forthcoming books, including the upcoming Emily Dickinson: A Biography and Emily Dickinson and Children. Her research has included time at The Evergreens studying artifacts that belonged to or are associated with Gilbert Dickinson, who died suddenly of typhoid fever at the age of 8.

Kirk's talk, which is free and open to the public, is one of a series of events that will take place between March 28 and April 3, in a program titled " 'A little Madness in the Spring': Celebrating History and Poetry at The Emily Dickinson Museum."

For more information about this lecture and the rest of the week's events at the Dickinson Museum, visit www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

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Writer Elizabeth Carlisle To Speak at Frost Library at Amherst College March 25

March 5, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- In celebration of Women's History Month, Elizabeth Carlisle, author of Earthbound and Heavenbent: Elizabeth Porter Phelps and Life at Forty Acres, 1747-1817 (2004) will speak on Thursday, March 25 at 4 p.m. in the Albert E. Barnett, M.D. '52 Reading Room in the Archives and Special Collections in the Robert Frost Library at Amherst College. The talk and a reception to follow, sponsored with the support of the Howard A. Newton '06 Memorial Fund and the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc. are free and open to the public. Carlisle based her research for Earthbound and Heavenbent on the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Papers and other materials in the Frost Library, and this talk is one in a series featuring scholars who have made use of the library's collections.

Earthbound and Heavenbent tells the story of Elizabeth Porter Phelps, who was born in 1747 and spent most of her life at Forty Acres, the handsome family home now preserved as the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Historic House in Hadley. Phelps kept a diary and corresponded with friends, describing the extraordinary times in which she lived. Phelps's writings and Carlisle's narrative detail the daily rigors of 18th- and early-19th-century farming, sewing and cooking; the intimate truths of the Phelps's personal, family and community life; and the events, local and farther afield, that were shaping the United States. Carlisle's diary and letters paint a domestic foreground against the dramatic background of history: the French and Indian Wars, the American Revolution, Shay's Rebellion and the War of 1812.

A review in Publisher's Weekly placed Earthbound and Heavenbent in the genre of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Midwife's Tale, noting, "its emphasis on the ways that women shaped early America offers a welcome addition to that crucial perspective on history."

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Joshua Goldstein To Speak on Militarized Masculinity at Amherst College Mar. 9

March 4, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Joshua Goldstein, author of the new book, The Real Price of War: How We Pay for the War on Terror, will give a talk title "Heroes: The Making of Militarized Masculinity" on Tuesday, Mar. 9 at 8 p.m. in the Frontroom of the Keefe Campus Center at Amherst College. Goldstein's talk, sponsored by the Men's Project of Amherst College, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, Amherst Feminist Alliance and the Interdisciplinary Student Fund Committee, will be free and open to the public.

Goldstein, professor emeritus of international relations at American University and a research professor at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University, is also the author of War and Gender: How Gender Shapes the War System and Vice Versa (2001), Three-Way Street: Strategic Reciprocity in World Politics (coauthored with John R. Freeman, 1990), Long Cycles: Prosperity and War in the Modern Age (1988) and the widely used textbook International Relations (5th edition, 2003). In addition to political science journals such as The American Political Science Review, Journal of Conflict Resolution and International Studies Quarterly, Goldstein has contributed essays to The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Christian Science Monitor. Educated at Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Goldstein has also taught at the University of Southern California and received a MacArthur Foundation Individual Research and Writing Grant.

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Robert Stalnaker To Speak on "What is de re belief?" at Amherst College March 25

March 4, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Robert Stalnaker, the Laurence S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will address the question, "What is de re belief?" on Thursday, March 25, at 4:30 p.m. in the Pruyne Lecture Room in Fayerweather Hall. Stalnaker's talk, sponsored by the Department of Philosophy at Amherst College and the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science as part of a series on "Ethics, Metaphysics, and Psychology of Belief," will be free and open to the public.

Stalnaker's teaching and research interests are in philosophical logic, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language. He is the author of Inquiry (1984) and of a series of papers on the logic and semantics of conditionals, most of which are included in an anthology on conditionals, Ifs, edited by W. Harper, G. Pearce, and Stalnaker (1981). He also has written on the semantics and pragmatics of natural language. His papers extending ideas he set out in Inquiry, on the problem of intentionality and the relation between language and thought, include "On What's in the Head," in Philosophical Perspectives 3 (1990) and "Narrow Content" in Propositional Attitudes (1990). His current work concerns the philosophical foundations of "possible worlds" semantics for modal and conditional logics, using this semantic framework to help clarify metaphysical questions about necessity and possibility, concepts of knowledge, common knowledge and mutual belief, inductive reasoning, rational decision-making and the relation between modality and quantification.

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Austin Sarat is New President of Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs

March 3, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Austin Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College, has been elected president of the Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs. He will begin his two-year term on July 1.

The Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs is a national organization for colleges and universities that have interdisciplinary programs geared toward undergraduate education about law and justice, both in the United States and internationally. It holds an annual meeting and is a clearinghouse for information about teaching in and administering those interdisciplinary programs.

The author of Law in the Liberal Arts (2004), among many other works, Sarat has taught at Amherst since 1973 in the departments of political science and law, jurisprudence and social thought. He has also served as president of the Law and Society Association and of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture and the Humanities.

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Amherst College Art Historian Nicola Courtright Looks at Counter-Reformation Rome in New Book

March 2, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- In a new book, The Papacy and the Art of Reform in Sixteenth-Century Rome: Gregory XIII''s Tower of the Winds in the Vatican ($85, 344 pp., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2004), Nicola Courtright, professor of fine arts at Amherst College, explains the import of the "Tower of the Winds," a three-story Vatican apartment built and painted to celebrate Gregory's greatest achievement: calendar reform and creation of the Gregorian calendar in 1582. The tower, she writes, "proclaimed with assurance not only Gregory's political and religious authority over the capital," but also his "domination of nature, time, and past and present cultures."

In response to the Protestant Reformation, Gregory, who led the Roman church from 1572 until his death in 1585, rebuilt and restored many of Rome's streets, churches and public monuments-and remade the calendar. Courtright writes, "The [Gregorian] calendar's purpose has become obscured in our post-Enlightenment age, because it was not changed for the sake of scientific accuracy." The Tower of the Winds "made clear to contemporaries the inextricably intertwined relationship of Gregory's calendar reform to his mission to renew faith and lead the Christian world toward redemption."

The Tower of the Winds has remained a mostly unknown and unstudied monument to Gregory's mastery of the temporal and eternal, the political and the spiritual worlds. Courtright considers its innovations in architecture and decoration, explores the efflorescent Flemish landscapes in all of its seven rooms, and explains its wider religious and political purpose in the culture of Gregorian Rome and the Counter-Reformation. Another important contribution of The Tower of the Winds is the first translation of an unpublished treatise on the winds by Egnatio Danti, the 16th-century mathematician and cosmographer.

Courtright has taught at Amherst since 1989. She received a B.A. degree from Oberlin College, an M.A. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. She is a Fulbright Fellow, a fellow of the American Academy in Rome and a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies. The College Art Association recently elected Courtright its vice president of publications, and a member of its executive committee.

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"Heartstrings: Love Songs with Guitar" at Amherst College March 11

March 2, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- Ann Maggs, vocalist, accompanied by guitarist Freddie Bryant, will present "Heartstrings: Love Songs with Guitar" on Thursday, March 11 at 12 noon in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. Free and open to the public, the concert will feature music by Astor Piazzola, Django Reinhardt, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Fats Waller and others.

Currently a Copeland Fellow at Amherst College, Bryant was recently a State Department "Jazz Ambassador" abroad. A graduate of Amherst College trained in classical as well as jazz guitar, Bryant received an M.A. degree from the Yale School of Music.

A graduate of the University of Massachusetts and the University of Rhode Island, Maggs is the assistant music librarian at Amherst College where she teaches jazz voice. She also teaches at Westfield State College.

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Verdi "Requiem" at Amherst College March 7

March 2, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- The Amherst College Choral Society and Orchestra will present Giuseppe Verdi's timeless masterpiece, the "Requiem" on Sunday, March 7, at 3 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center on the Amherst College campus. Mallorie Chernin, director of the choral music program at Amherst, will direct the chorus; Mark Lane Swanson, director of instrumental music, will lead the orchestra.

Professional guest soloists from the New York City Opera and elsewhere include Stephanie Dawn Johnson, soprano; Kimberly Gratland James, mezzo-soprano; Paul Mow, tenor; and Craig Phillips, bass-baritone. Mark Lane Swanson will conduct.

Dedicated to the memory of the Italian literary giant Alessandro Manzoni-who along with Verdi was beloved as an artistic hero of the 19th-century Italian reunification movement, the Risorgimento-the operatic "Requiem" is a moving 80-minute tribute to the triumph of the human spirit.

General admission for performance is $5; Amherst College students will be admitted free of charge with college identification. Advance reservations (which are highly recommended) may be made by telephoning the Amherst College Music Department Concert Office at 413/542-2195 or by e-mailing concerts@amherst.edu. Unclaimed tickets will be released beginning at 2:45 p.m. on the day of the concert.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu