Painter and Printmaker Michael Mazur '57 To Speak at Amherst College Oct. 22

October 12, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Distinguished painter and printmaker Michael Mazur will give an illustrated lecture about his recent work titled "A Funny Thing Happened To Me on My Way To the College Last Fall" in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (115 Fayerweather) at Amherst College at 4 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 22. Sponsored by the Friends of the Amherst College Library, the lecture and a reception afterward at Archives and Special Collections in the Robert Frost Library, where there will be a small exhibit, are free and open to the public. Other artworks by Michael Mazur will be on view beginning October 19 at the Mead Art Museum.

A 1957 graduate of Amherst College, Mazur studied with sculptor and printmaker Leonard Baskin at the college. The recipient of B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees from Yale University, Mazur has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, Brandeis University and Harvard University. One of the foremost monotype artists in the U.S., he has exhibited nationally and internationally since 1962. A solo retrospective exhibition of his prints was presented by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 2000. In 1992, he collaborated with Robert Pinsky on a translation of The Inferno of Dante, published in January 1993 with prints by Mazur. An edition of this portfolio, exhibited on a national tour from 1993 to 1997, was acquired by the Mead Art Museum in 2002.

The Oct. 22 presentation is held in conjunction with Mazur's October 18-22 residency as a Robert Frost Fellow at Amherst College. He and master printer Bob Townsend will be in the print shop of the Fine Arts Department working with the students of Amherst faculty member Betsey Garand on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.

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Amherst College Professor Javier Corrales Receives Fulbright Award

October 6, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Javier Corrales, associate professor of political science at Amherst College, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to travel and conduct research in Venezuela. Corrales will study why so many ex-presidents and complete newcomers are running for office in Latin America and winning. Corrales suspects that this choice of candidates is both symptomatic and a cause of some of the region's democratic malfunction. While in Caracas, Corrales will also lecture at the Institute for Higher Studies in Administration.

Corrales considered the office of the president in his most recent book, Presidents Without Parties: The Politics of Economic Reform in Argentina and Venezuela in the 1990s (2002). He argued that the crisis of political parties in Latin America often affects not just the ways citizens are represented, but also the way states govern the economy.

Corrales, who has taught at Amherst since 1996, has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and worked at the World Bank in Washington, D.C. He has taught in Argentina, Paraguay and Venezuela, and earned a B.S. in foreign service from Georgetown University, and a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.

Corrales is one of approximately 800 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad to some 140 countries in the 2004-05 academic year as Fulbright Scholars. Established in 1946 by the late Senator William J. Fulbright of Arkansas, the Fulbright Scholar Program seeks to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the world.

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Images of "Pain of War" at Mead Art Museum at Amherst College Oct. 28 to Dec. 19

October 6, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-The Mead Art Museum at Amherst College will present "The Pain of War," an exhibition of some 60 prints, photographs and videos that address the theme of suffering associated with war. This timely show, organized by Carol Solomon Kiefer, curator of European art at the Mead, with the assistance of Erin Sullivan, graduate intern, will run from Oct. 28 until Dec. 19.

"The Pain of War" provokes viewers to ask: Why are we so captivated by images of pain and suffering? Does their incessant presence in our media-saturated world inure us to their awfulness? How do we respond emotionally, psychologically, intellectually and politically? What issues of truth, sensationalism, exploitation, aesthetics, history and memory do such images raise?

"The Pain of War" addresses issues raised by Susan Sontag's celebrated meditation Regarding the Pain of Others (2003), in which she wrote, "One can feel obliged to look at photographs that record great cruelties and crimes. One should feel obliged to think about what it means to look at them, about the capacity to actually assimilate what they show."

With works from the permanent collection of the Mead Art Museum and important loans, "The Pain of War" will present images from the 17th century to the present day, documenting atrocities from the Thirty Years' War, the Napoleonic Wars, the Crimean War, the First and Second World Wars, the Holocaust, the Vietnam War and more recent conflicts such as September 11, 2001 and the war in Iraq. Highlights will include prints by Jacques Callot, Francisco Goya, Edouard Manet, George Bellows, Käthe Kollwitz, Otto Dix, Pablo Picasso and Dinos and Jake Chapman; photographs by Robert Capa, W. Eugene Smith, Lee Miller, Larry Burrows, Joel Meyerowitz, James Nachtwey and Sebastião Salgado; and films by Mona Hatoum and Richard Levine.

Several academic departments at Amherst College are co-sponsoring related programs in conjunction with the exhibition. These programs include lectures, gallery talks, films and a panel discussion, all to be held in Stirn Auditorium. Kim Phuc, the subject of the famous 1972 Vietnam photograph of the naked young girl burned by napalm as she runs screaming from her village, and today a UNESCO Ambassador of Goodwill, will speak at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 4. Noted psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton, lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, will speak on "American Survivors: Vietnam and Iraq" at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 9.

On Nov. 11 Amherst professors Robert Bezucha (History), Lawrence Douglas (Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought), Margaret Hunt (History) and Heidi Gilpin (German) will participate in a panel discussion of "The Pain of War." Members of the Amherst faculty have written responses to the exhibited works; these responses will accompany the show.

Viewers should be advised that this exhibition contains graphic images, some of which may not suitable for children.

The Mead Art Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday evenings until 9 p. m. More information is available on the museum's Website at www.amherst.edu/~mead or by calling the Mead Art Museum at 413/542-2335. All events are free and open to the public.

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Public Health Advocate David A. Kessler '73 To Speak at Amherst College Oct. 21

October 6, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-David Kessler, dean and vice chancellor for medical affairs at the University of California at San Francisco, will talk about "Tobacco Wars" on Thursday, Oct. 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Kessler's talk, the annual Everett H. Pryde Lecture, will be free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

Former dean of the Yale School of Medicine and former commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Kessler is best known for taking on the tobacco industry under Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton (1990-97). He instituted a program to regulate the marketing and sale of tobacco products to children, and later revealed that the tobacco companies had known for 50 years that nicotine was an addictive drug and manipulated its levels in cigarettes. He chronicled these efforts in A Question of Intent (2001).

After his B.A. degree in 1973 from Amherst, Kessler earned his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1979 and did his internship and medical residency in pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He received a J.D. from The University of Chicago Law School, and a professional certificate in management from New York University Graduate School of Business Administration. He has published numerous articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and other medical journals, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Everett H. Pryde Fund, established in 1986 by Mrs. Phyllis W. Pryde in honor of her husband, is used to bring to Amherst distinguished alumni who specialize in chemistry and to honor a senior who is an outstanding research assistant in chemistry. Everett Pryde graduated in the Amherst College Class of 1939, obtained an M.A. at the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin, and went on to become a distinguished scientist and researcher in natural chemistry, publishing more than 100 papers and was awarded 20 patents.

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Amherst College Law Professor Austin Sarat Defends "Cause Lawyering" in "Something to Believe In"

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Austin Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College, is the co-author of Something to Believe In: Politics, Professionalism and Cause Lawyering ($35, Stanford University Press, Palo Alto, 2004). Sarat and Stuart Scheingold, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Washington, explore the controversial work of cause lawyers-human rights lawyers, feminist lawyers, right-to-life lawyers, civil rights and civil liberties lawyers, anti-death penalty lawyers, environmental lawyers, property rights lawyers and anti-poverty lawyers.

Lawyers in the United States are trained to see lawyering as a technical activity, not a moral or political calling, and are supposed to be willing to set aside their own beliefs and work for any client. Cause lawyers, according to Sarat and Scheingold, refuse to deny their own convictions, and challenge the conventions of what lawyers should do and of how they should behave. Something to Believe In examines the role of social commitment in their practice, their relationships to the organized legal profession and the contributions they make to democratic politics.

Sarat has taught at Amherst since 1974, and is the author of When the State Kills: Capital Punishment and the American Condition. He has served as President of the Law and Society Association and of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities.

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Hip-Hop Party and Workshop at Amherst College Oct. 21-22

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.- The Amherst College Global Sound Project will kick off a Hip-Hop Happening on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 21 and 22, with a dance party on Thursday, Oct. 21, at 9:30 p.m. in the Front Room in the Keefe Campus Center. The Original Jazzy Jay and GrandWizzard Theodore, pioneering hip-hop DJs, and renowned hip-hop dance legend Jorge "Fabel" Pabon will provide the entertainment. They will be joined by hip-hop publicist and agent, Christie-Z-Pabon, co-founder of "Tools of War", on Friday, Oct. 22, at 10:00 a.m. in the Amherst College music department for a workshop. Both events are free and open to the public.

The Original Jazzy Jay began his career in the Bronx under the guidance of Afrika Bambaataa. During the '80s club revolution, Jazzy went from performing on the streets to spinning records in clubs. With the Jazzy 5, he recorded the hit single "Jazzy Sensation." He co-produced the seminal hit "Planet Rock" with Bambaataa and The Soul Sonic Force, played the role of club DJ in the hip-hop classic Beat Street and contributed to the movie's soundtrack. A co-founder of Def Jam records, where he worked with such artists as LL Cool J, the Beastie Boys and Public Enemy, Jazzy was inducted into the DMC/Technics DJ Hall of Fame in 2000. He is featured in the DJ documentary Scratch and has headlined every Scratch Tour in the U.S., Japan, New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

GrandWizzard Theodore, who invented the "scratch" and "needle drop" techniques, was a member of the L Brothers and the Fantastic Five, and was also involved in creating the soundtrack for the cult classic movie WildStyle. He was inducted into the DMC/Technics DJ Hall of Fame in 1998 and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Turntablist Federation. He served as a panelist at "Roots, Rhyme and Rage: The Hip-Hop Story" at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999 and is also featured in the DJ documentary Scratch.

Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, born and raised in Spanish Harlem, developed his dance and choreography career at hip-hop jams and clubs throughout the city. President of the Hierophysics crew, senior vice president of the Rock Steady Crew, member of Magnificent Force, and an honorary member of the Electric Boogaloos, Fabel also co-founded GhettOriginal Productions, with whom Fabel co-authored, co-directed and co-choreographed the first two hip-hop musicals, "So! What Happens Now?" and "Jam on the Groove." Fabel served as a consultant, moderator, panelist and writer for "Roots, Rhyme and Rage" at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and, he is the first hip-hop dance instructor to be employed at N.Y.U.'s Experimental Dance Theater Wing.

Christie Z-Pabon made a name for herself on the DJ battle scene by overseeing as many as 17 DJ battles a year and inducting hip-hop pioneers like GrandMaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa into the Technics/DMC Hall of Fame. With her husband, Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, she co-founded "Tools of War," a grassroots hip-hop company named with the idea that there are many "tools" one can use in battling within hip-hop culture: turntables, microphones, paint, the body and especially the voice. In 2002, she teamed up with the Original Jazzy Jay to launch the King/Queen of the Beat Producer Battle with such judges as Premier, Hank Shocklee, Diamond D and Lord Finesse. At no loss for new battle formats, she created a DJ battle for the 2002 Zulu Anniversary, which did not allow any profanity or derogatory remarks. Christie is frequently commissioned to consult, fact-check and proofread to ensure historical accuracy in books and magazines. She recently completed the first nine-city Vinyl Kombat DJ Battle tour.

The Amherst College Global Sound Project supports members of the music faculty, collaborating with colleagues at other institutions, in developing an approach to the teaching of music understood in the context of global and cultural studies.

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Indian Jazz-Fusion at Amherst College Oct. 15

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Shubhendra Rao, a leading sitar player; Biplab Bhattacharya, a rising star among classical Indian musicians; and jazz guitarist Freddie Bryant will present "East Meets West: An Evening of Indian Jazz-Fusion," on Friday, Oct. 15, on 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall at Amherst College. The concert is free and open to the public.

Connoisseurs acknowledge Rao, a disciple of sitar maestro Pandit Ravi Shankar, as a worthy successor to his guru's tradition. A reviewer for The Times of India wrote that Rao "has fully imbibed the style of his mentor and embellished his music with numerous innovative ideas."

A wonderful young player of tabla, or Indian drums, Bhattacharya had his initial training from his father, Kanai Bhattacharya, and has been under the tutelage of Pandit Shankar Ghosh for many years. He has traveled through Europe as an accompanist to many artists in many styles. On this tour he makes his American debut.

Bryant, a graduate of Amherst College trained in classical as well as jazz guitar, is now a "Jazz Ambassador." The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the United States Department of State are sponsoring "Freddie Bryant and Kaleidoscope-The String Project," on tour across North Africa, the Middle East and India, celebrating Latin jazz and its influence on American music. Freddie Bryant is the guitarist, composer and arranger for The String Project, a group whose sound is an eclectic blend of world rhythms with jazz.

Rao has a Website at www.shubhendrarao.com; Freddie Bryant at www.freddiebryant.com/itinerary.html.

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Poet Dan Chiasson To Read at Amherst College Oct. 21

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-Poet Dan Chiasson will read from his work at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 21, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at the Amherst College. The event, sponsored by the Creative Writing Center, is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

The Afterlife of Objects, Chiasson's debut poetry collection, was named a "notable book" by the New Yorker and "a superb first book" by The Washington Post. It is "a kind of dreamed autobiography," according to the University of Chicago Press, and "both intensely personal and deeply rooted in recognizable events of personal, familial, or national significance." Chiasson has received a Pushcart Prize, and his work has been published in Slate and Ploughshares, among other places. A 1993 graduate of Amherst College, Chiasson received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, and is currently assistant professor of English at Stony Brook University, where he directs the Poetry Center.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center puts on a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. More information is available at the center's Website, www.amherst.edu/~cwc.

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Portrait, Poetry and Biography in the Iranian World at Amherst College Oct. 15

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-"Majalis ul-ushaq: Portrait, Poetry and Biography in the Iranian World," a symposium exploring the role of Sufism in the pre-modern greater Persian world in pre-modern times, will take place on Friday, Oct. 15, at 1 p.m. in Room 101 in Chapin Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Religion Department, the Willis Wood Fund, and the Hamilton Fund at Amherst College, all sessions are free and open to the public.

Taking its name from the a 15th century Persian literary masterpiece called the Majalis ul-ushaq- literally "conferences of lovers"- the symposium will not focus on the Majalis ul-ushaq itself but on the role of Sufism in Iran, Central Asia, pre-modern northern India, central Asia, Iran and Anatolia. Combining biographies of prophets, saints and poets with those of some prominent members of the ruling Timurid dynasty, the Majalis ul-ushaq became popular in courtly circles of the Persian-speaking world in the 16th century; lavishly produced manuscripts from that period featured outstanding Persian miniatures. The symposium will explore questions of what purposes were met by such popular biographical works.

At 1 p.m., the first session will address "Admonishing Words and Exemplary Bodies: Toward a 'Fair and Balanced' Approach to the History of Sufism," with Shahzad Bashir (Carleton College); "On Seeing: Relationships of Resemblance in Pre-modern Islamic Thought" with Jamal J. Elias (Amherst College); and "Divine Devotion and Filial Failure: The Pattern of Ignoring Parental Concerns in Some Sufi Hagiographie" with Farooq Hamid (Whittier College).

The second session, from 2:45 p.m. until 4 p.m., will address "Spiritual Practice and Corporate Identity in Medieval Sufi Communities: The Khalvati-'Ishqi-Shattari Continuum" with Devin Deweese (Indiana University); "Portraiture and Biography: Sufi Images in Sixteenth Century Manuscripts," with E. Sara Wolper (University of New Hampshire); and "Defining Kingship and Authority in Early Safavid Painting: Lessons from the 1604 Shahnama of Firdawsi," with Kishwar Rizvi (Barnard College).

Michael Cooperson (University of California at Los Angeles) will lead a discussion at 4:10 p.m., followed by a reception in Chapin Lounge.

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Todd Palmer and Friends To Present Music at Amherst Oct. 18

October 1, 2004
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.-In the latest installment of the 2004-05 Music at Amherst Series, clarinetist Todd Palmer and Friends will perform a program including Mozart's "Kegelstatt," Husa's "Evocations de Slovaquie" and Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time," on Monday, Oct. 18, at 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall at Amherst College.

The quartet's performers include Todd Palmer, clarinet; Melvin Chen, piano; Scott St. John, violin and viola; and Christopher Costanza, cello.
Palmer has performed as a concerto soloist, recitalist and clinician in 46 states, and was the first wind player ever to receive the Grand Prize at the Ima Hogg Young Artists Competition in Houston, Texas. He has also been principal clarinetist in both the Minnesota Orchestra and Wyoming's Grand Teton Festival.

The latest information can be obtained from the Amherst College Concert Website at www.amherst.edu/~concerts. Admission to the concert is $22; senior citizens and Amherst College employees, $19; and students $5. For more information and brochures call the Concert Office at 413/542-2195, or e-mail concert manager Michael Baumgarten at mhbaumgarten@amherst.edu.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu