Forum on the Patriot Act at Amherst College Oct. 27

October 13, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—A public forum on the Patriot Act will take place at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Organized by the Amherst Chapter of the American Association of University Professors and the Robert Frost Library at Amherst College, and funded by the library and the Amherst College Office of Diversity, the forum and a reception to follow are free and open to the public.

The participants in the forum are Robert O'Neil, the director of The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression and former president of the University of Virginia; Deborah Caldwell-Stone, the deputy director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom; and Daniel Lyons, an associate division counsel at the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

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New Yorker Writer Mark Danner To Speak at Amherst College Nov. 2

October 13, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Mark Danner, an acclaimed commentator on politics and foreign policy, will speak on “Power, the Press and the Iraq War: Torture and Human Rights after Abu Ghraib” at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Funded through the President's Office of Amherst College, Five Colleges Inc., The Department of Legal Studies at UMass, the International Relations Program of Mount Holyoke and Hampshire College's PAWSS, Danner's lecture is free and open to the public.

Danner has been writing on politics and foreign policy, with a focus on wars and conflict, for 25 years. He has covered conflicts throughout the world, including Central America, Haiti, the Balkans, Iraq and the Middle East. Since 1990 Danner has been a staff writer at The New Yorker and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His articles have appeared in Harper's, The New York Times and Aperture. He has authored three books: The Massacre at El Mozote: A Parable of the Cold War (1994); The Road to Illegitimacy (2004); and Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror (2004); as well as forthcoming books on the former Yugoslavia and Haiti. He has received numerous honors, including a National Magazine Award and three Overseas Press Awards. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999.

Danner currently serves as a professor of journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, and as the Henry R. Luce Professor of Human Rights, Democracy and Journalism at Bard College.

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Niko Kolodny To Speak on "Why Be Rational?" at Amherst College Nov. 3

October 13, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Niko Kolodny, assistant professor of philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley, will lecture on the question "Why Be Rational?" at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3, in Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. Organized by the Amherst College Department of Philosophy and funded by the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science, Kolodny's talk is free and open to the public.

Kolodny's academic concentration lies in moral and political philosophy. He has served as an assistant professor of philosophy at Harvard University and as a research associate at the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University. His publications include "Why Be Rational?" (Mind, 2005) and "Love as Valuing a Relationship" (Philosophical Review, 2003).

Kolodny received his B.A. from Williams College in 1994, an M.A. from Oxford in 1996 and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2003. He returned to Berkeley as a professor in 2005, teaching courses on moral objectivity, John Rawls and the social contract, and utilitarian traditions in political thought. His current work focuses on partiality, rationality, promises and Rousseau.

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Robert Kegan To Speak on “Hidden Curriculum of Adult Life” at Amherst College Nov. 3

October 13, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Robert Kegan, professor of adult learning and professional development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, will speak on “In Over Our Heads?: The Hidden Curriculum of Adult Life” at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3, in Stirn Auditorium at Amherst College. His talk, sponsored by the Mayo-Smith-Read Trans-Disciplinary Fund, is free and open to the public.

The recipient of four honorary doctorates, Kegan has studied and written extensively on ongoing psychological development throughout adulthood. His inventive notion that “a person is as much an activity as a thing” has sparked widespread discussion and debate on the continued mental and emotional growth that humans experience as they grow older. At Harvard, he is the co-director of the Change Leadership Group and the educational chair of the Institute for Management and Leadership in Education.

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Amherst College Choral Society Homecoming Concert Oct. 22

October 12, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Choral Society will present its annual Homecoming Weekend concert at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center on the Amherst College campus.

Mallorie Chernin, director, and Rachel Dunham '05, assistant director, will conduct the Concert Choir, Men's Glee Club and Women's Chorus.

Andrea Kahn '08 and Jay Buchman '07 will lead the Madrigal Singers.

The choirs will perform music by Zoltán Kodály, Morten Lauridsen, Antonio Lotti, Stephen Hatfield and many others. The concert will conclude with traditional Amherst College songs.

Tickets are $6 for general admission; $3 for children under 12 and senior citizens. Tickets may be reserved by phoning Mallorie Chernin in the Choral Office at 413/542-2484. Tickets may also be purchased at the Alumni House during registration for Family Weekend. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door.

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Amherst College Orchestra Homecoming Concert Oct. 21

October 12, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Symphony Orchestra will present its annual Homecoming Weekend concert at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 21, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College.

Mark Lane Swanson, music director, will conduct, assisted by Rob Lane '05.

The 75-member symphony orchestra will open the Homecoming Weekend festivities with a full-length concert of exciting Russian classics. The program includes Rimsky-Korsakov's “Procession of the Nobles,” Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 and Shostakovich 's Symphony No. 5. The piano concerto will feature acclaimed guest soloist Henry Wong Doe.

Tickets are $5 for general admission and are available at the door on the night of the concert; the concert is free to faculty, staff and students with an Amherst ID.

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Party and Concert for Eric Sawyer's “String Works” at Amherst Books Oct. 26

October 12, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—A party and CD release concert to celebrate “String Works,” the new Albany Records recording by Eric Sawyer, assistant professor of music at Amherst College, will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Amherst Books (8 Main St., Amherst, Mass.).

Scheduled featured performers will include Elizabeth Chang, violin; Francine Treste, violin; and Rafael Popper-Keizer, cello. Special musical guests may also drop by.

Composed from 1999 to 2002, “String Works” reflects Sawyer's belief in the expressive power of harmony. “While new sonorities, textures and physical rhythms that have infused much recent music are all marvelous additions to the musical lexicon,” Sawyer writes, “it is the domain of harmony that can most provide a context of emotional resonance.”

A member of the Amherst faculty since 2001, Sawyer received an A.B. degree in music from Harvard University in 1985, a M.A. in composition from Columbia University in 1988 and a Ph.D. in composition from the University of California, Davis, in 1994. He has held fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Harvard University. He was founding director of the critically-acclaimed contemporary ensemble Longitude. Recent performances include works on programs by the San Jose Chamber Orchestra, Brentano String Quartet, Seraphim Singers, Ensemble Phoenix, Radius Ensemble, Laurel Trio, Now & Then Chamber Players, Aurelius Ensemble, Opera Longy, Ives Quartet, Arden Quartet, Lighthouse Chamber Players, Earplay and Empyrean. He is completing an opera with poet John Shoptaw titled Our American Cousin.

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Violinist Leila Josefowicz To Present Music at Amherst Oct. 28

October 12, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Acclaimed young violinist Leila Josefowicz will continue the 2005-06 Music at Amherst Series with a concert at 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 28, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. The evening's program will include works by Ravel, Beethoven and Messiaen.

Josefowicz came to national attention in 1994, when she made her Carnegie Hall debut performing the Tchaikovsky Concerto under the baton of Sir Neville Marriner. Since then she has appeared with many of the world's leading orchestras and at summer music festivals such as New York's Mostly Mozart Festival, the Hollywood Bowl and the Salzburg Festival. She has also been featured on national television broadcasts including “Evening at Pops” and “Live from Lincoln Center” on PBS and “The Tonight Show” on NBC.

The Philadelphia Inquirer praises Josefowicz as a “serious musical force.” The Chicago Sun-Times notes that “she plays with a zest and fiery personality that has guaranteed her a distinctive profile among the current pack of twenty-something violinists.”

Admission to the concert is $22. Senior citizens and Amherst College employees can buy tickets for $19, and student tickets cost $5. Tickets can be purchased in advance over the telephone by calling the Amherst College Concert Office at 413/542-2195.

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Amherst College Philosophy Professor Alexander George Creates "AskPhilosophers" To Bring Philosophy to All

October 11, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Alexander George, professor of philosophy at Amherst College, has launched a new Website, called AskPhilosophers (www.askphilosophers.org ), that allows anyone to ask anything-and get an answer from a thinker trained in philosophy.

George hopes that AskPhilosophers can address a "paradox surrounding philosophy. On the one hand, everyone confronts philosophical issues throughout his or her life. But on the other, very few have the opportunity to learn about philosophy, a subject that is usually taught only at the college level." The new site puts "the skills and knowledge of trained philosophers at the service of the general public" by gathering 33 respected academic philosophers who constantly scan questions posted on the Website, on topics ranging from emotion and ethics to language and logic, from politics to religion and science. Currently, the site examines the nature of truth, the existence of free will and whether time is timeless.

A member of the faculty at Amherst since 1988, George received a B.A. degree from Columbia University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. He is editor of Reflections on Chomsky (1989), Western State Terrorism (1991) and Mathematics and Mind (1994). His most recent philosophy book, written with Daniel Velleman, professor of mathematics at Amherst, was Philosophies of Mathematics (2002). With his Amherst colleague Lawrence Douglas, George is co-author of Sense and Nonsensibility: Lampoons of Learning and Literature (2004.) Douglas and George also have published humorous work together in The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, McSweeney's and the Boston Globe, among other publications, and they contribute a regular column to The Chronicle of Higher Education.

George built the site with Qingsi Zhu, an Amherst College sophomore from Shanghai, China; Nick Doty, an Amherst senior from Winchester, Va.; and Paul Chapin, a curricular specialist for humanities at Amherst.

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Amherst College Writing Dean Susan Snively Puts Voyages to Verse in New Poetry Book; To Read at Amherst College Oct. 24

October 11, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—In her new book of poems, Skeptic Traveler (David Robert Books, Cincinnati, 2005, 96 pp.), Susan Snively, the director of the Writing Center at Amherst College and associate dean of students, relays her travels throughout the United States and Europe in accessible and artful verse. Snively will read from her work at 8 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 24, in the Alumni House at Amherst College. This reading is free and open to the public.

William Pritchard writes, “Skeptic Traveler is a collection graced by intelligence, wit, and also by a feeling heart. Susan Snively's skepticism, whether exercised in traveling to other countries, to her familial past, or to the nooks and crannies of a complicated present, is a humane one…. ” Richard Wilbur describes Snively as “clean-cut, fluent, witty, direct, full of personality and surprise. [She] can also be deeply meditative, grave and affecting, uproarious.”

Snively is a graduate of Smith College and received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Boston University. She has been writing and teaching at Amherst College since 1981. In addition to her newest release, Snively has published several books of poetry, including From This Distance (1981), Voices in the House (1988) and The Undertow (1998).

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu