Amherst College English Professor Allen Guttmann Receives Honorary Degree in Belgium

November 2, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—On Wednesday, Oct. 12, Amherst College's Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of English and American Studies Allen Guttmann received an honorary doctorate from the Universiteit Leuven, known to French speakers as l'Université de Louvain. This Flemish university, founded in 1425, is one of the oldest in Europe.

Guttmann's honorary degree was awarded in recognition of his “distinguished contributions to the study of sports history.” The ceremony, held in the Renaissance “Promotiezaal,” included an academic procession, a laudatio, an address by Professor Guttmann and music by a Flemish group known as the New Orleans Jazz Quartet. The ceremony concluded with a banquet in the university's medieval “Beguinzaal.”

A member of the Amherst faculty since 1959, Guttmann is the author of Sports: The First Five Millennia (2005), which received the annual Book Award of the North American Society for Sport History. His other books include From Ritual to Record: the Nature of Modern Sports (1978), Women's Sports: A History (1991), Games and Empires (1994) and The Olympics: A History of the Modern Games (2002). He received the first President's Award for Sports Studies from the International Olympic Committee in 2000.

###

Exhibit of Drawings of Architect Maurice Childs '54 at Amherst College

November 2, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Library Archives and Special Collections will present an exhibit of the artwork of Maurice Childs, a 1954 graduate of Amherst and a leading architect and preservationist, until Dec. 31, in the Archives and Special Collections at the Robert Frost Library at Amherst College. A reception will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5. Free and open to the public, the exhibit and reception are made possible by the Archives and Special Collections.

One of the founding partners of the architecture, interior and urban design firm Childs Bertman Tseckares in Boston, Childs was widely respected as an architect and lauded as a preservationist. Childs graduated from Amherst College in 1954 and after serving in the army earned his master's degree in architecture at MIT. Childs then worked as an architect in Denmark for a year before returning to work for Sasaki Associates in Watertown, Conn. Childs' projects included the Montshire Museum of Science in Vermont, Tufts' Aidekman Arts Center and the Niketown building on Newbury Street in Boston's Back Bay. He also designed many assisted-living centers in Boston and, with other members of his firm, several Harvard building renovations—including that of the Memorial Hall Tower. Childs chaired the Brookline Preservation Commission and served as a member of the Special Commission on Historic Preservation for the Commonwealth. In 1996 he was named a fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Childs served as the principal architect of the renovation of the John Adams Courthouse in Pemberton Square, one of the largest public sector projects in Boston. The Courthouse houses the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and the Massachusetts Social Law Library. Childs died in March 2005 at the age of 72.

During Family Weekend, the exhibition will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4. On Saturday, Nov. 5, the exhibition will be open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Until December 31, the exhibition can also be viewed during regular hours at Archives and Special Collections, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m.

###

Professor and Author Heather Williams to Speak at Amherst College Nov. 30

November 2, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Heather Williams will speak on “Teaching as a Political Act: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom” at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 30, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the President's Initiative Fund on Education and Social Justice, this event is free and open to the public.

Williams, the author of Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom (2005), is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill where she teaches and writes about African Americans in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in the American South. Her current research centers on the separation of African American families during the antebellum period and subsequent attempts to reunify families following emancipation.

###

The Jupiter Quartet To Present Music at Amherst Nov. 11

November 2, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—In the third installment of the 2005-06 Music at Amherst Series, the Jupiter Quartet will perform a program of works by Haydn, Beethoven and Dutilleux at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 11, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College.

Lauded by the New York Sun as “one of the strongest young string quartets in the country,” the Jupiter String Quartet—Nelson Lee, violin; Megan Freivogel, violin; Elizabeth Freivogel, viola; and Daniel McDonough, cello—has been enthusiastically received at venues throughout the world, including the Aspen Music Festival, the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival and the Caramoor International Music Festival. According to the Boston Globe, “their tone quality is pleasing, their style polished, their equilibrium secure, and their intonation superb.” The Jupiter String Quartet has won both the 2004 Banff International String Quartet Competition and the Szekely Prize for best performance of a Beethoven quartet. The quartet also holds the position of Graduate String Quartet in Residence at the New England Conservatory in Boston.

The latest information can be obtained from the Amherst College Concert Website at www.amherst.edu/~concerts. Admission to the concert is $22; senior citizens and Amherst College employees $19; and students $5. For more information and brochures call the Concert Office at 413/542-2195, or e-mail concert manager Kevin Daly at kpdaly@amherst.edu.

###

Writer Sarah Schulman to Lecture and Read at Amherst College Nov. 10

November 2, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Playwright and novelist Sarah Schulman will speak on “United in Anger: A History of ACT UP” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. Following her talk, she will also give a fiction reading at 7 p.m. in Studio 3 of Webster Hall. Sponsored by the Amherst College Writing Center, these events are free and open to the public.

Schulman is the award-winning author of eight novels, including Rat Bohemia and After Delores, two nonfiction books, including My American History: Lesbian and Gay Life during the Reagan/Bush Years, and numerous plays. She is the co-director of the ACT UP Oral History Project and a professor of English at the City University of New York. Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship for playwriting, a Fulbright Fellowship for Judaic Studies, two American Library Association Book Awards and a Stonewall Award for Improving the Lives of Lesbians and Gays in the United States. Additionally, Schulman has been a Revson Fellow for the Future of New York City at Columbia University and a finalist for the Prix de Rome.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center organizes an annual reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. See the center's website, www.amherst.edu/~cwc , for more information.

###

Amherst College Choral Society Presents Family Weekend Concert Nov. 4

November 1, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Choral Society will present its annual Family Weekend concert at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. Music will be performed by the Concert Choir, Women's Chorus and Men's Glee Club, directed by Mallorie Chernin and Assistant Conductor Rachel Dunham '05. The Madrigal Singers, a student-led a cappella group directed by Andrea Kahn '08 and Jay Buchman '07, will also perform. The program will include music by Zoltán Kodály, Morten Lauridsen, Antonio Lotti, Stephen Hatfield and others. The program will conclude with traditional college songs.

General admission is $6; $3 for senior citizens, children under 12 and Amherst College students. Tickets may be reserved by calling 413/542-2484 or e-mailing mchernin@amherst.edu.

###

Amherst College Orchestra Presents Family Weekend Concert Nov. 5

November 1, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Symphony Orchestra will present the world premiere of Richard Beaudoin 's “Three Dreams” in tribute to retiring music professor Lewis Spratlan at its Family Weekend Concert at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. Also on the program are the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto with guest soloist Henry Wong Doe (Audience Favorite Prize Winner at the Rubinstein and Busoni international piano competitions) and the Shostakovich Fifth Symphony. The concert will be conducted by Mark Lane Swanson, director, and Rob Lane '05, assistant director.

Advance ticket reservations are recommended, and may be made at amherstorchestra@gmail.com. General admission is $5; tickets are free to Amherst College students and employees.

###

Colloquium on “The Multiple Caribbean” in Honor of Antonio Benítez Rojo at University of Massachusetts and Amherst College Nov.

November 1, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College will join with Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Hampshire College and the University of Massachusetts in hosting a colloquium on “The Multiple Caribbean” on Saturday, Nov. 5. The event will begin at 8:30 a.m. in Room 165-169 of the Campus Center at the University of Massachusetts and move to the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College at 2:30 p.m. A reception will follow at 7 p.m. in the Cape Cod Lounge at the University of Massachusetts. These events are free and open to the public.

The colloquium, a memorial tribute to acclaimed writer and Amherst College Spanish professor Antonio Benítez-Rojo, who died last year, will feature several of the leading thinkers on the Caribbean and Caribbean studies. Presenting will be Rhonda Cobham-Sander of Amherst College, George Lamming of Brown University, Yolanda Martínez San Miguel of the University of Pennsylvania and others. The morning session will focus on discussions of the Caribbean and its varied nature while the afternoon session will specifically remember Benítez-Rojo and his manifold contributions to the study and creation of Caribbean literature. The Robert Frost Memorial Library at Amherst College will also feature a biographical display of Benítez Rojo's objects and works all day in the Archives and Special Collections.

This colloquium is sponsored by Amherst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke Colleges; the Latin American Studies Program at Smith College; and the Department of Spanish, the Dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, the Dean of the Graduate School, the Vice Provost for Research, the Council for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies, the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and the Spanish and Portuguese Program at the University of Massachusetts.

###

Historian Tony Judt To Speak on “WWII, the Holocaust And Contemporary Europe: Too Much Memory?” at Amherst College Nov. 7

November 1, 2005
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Tony Judt, the Erich Maria Remarque Professor of European Studies, Modern Europe and Professor of History at NYU, will give a talk titled “Too Much Memory? World War II and the Holocaust in Europe Today” at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by The Corliss Lamont Fund, the President's Office and The Political Science Department, this talk is free and open to the public.

Having written on European history, political ideologies, Jewish history and the division of Europe, Judt has just published Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, a monumental work which, according to a Times of London reviewer, is able to “ break with the orthodox, almost triumphalist narrative of European history since the war, and to show just how complicated, confused and contingent that story really was.” Yet praising Judt's “clear-eyed judgment and mastery of detail,” The Times notes that, “almost to Judt's own surprise, this magnificently rich and readable book ends on an optimistic note.”

The author of Past Imperfect: French Intellectuals, 1944-1956 (1992), A Grand Illusion?: An Essay On Europe (1996) and The Burden Of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and The French Twentieth Century (1998), among other books, Judt is also a frequent contributor of essays and lengthy review articles to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, The New Republic, Daedalus and Foreign Affairs.

###

Pages

 

Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu