Nobel Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz To Speak at Amherst College March 2 on Hidden Costs of Iraq War

February 10, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Joseph E. Stiglitz, recipient of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, will lecture on “The Economic Costs of the Iraq War: An Appraisal Three Years After the Beginning of the Conflict” at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 2, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) at Amherst College. The event is open to the public at no charge.

A recent study by Stiglitz, a professor of economics at Columbia University, and Linda Bilmes, a budget expert from Harvard, concluded that the cost of the current Iraq war could be $2 trillion. Stiglitz and Bilmes have included costs that official estimates do not, such as long-term medical expenses for injured military personnel.

A 1964 graduate of Amherst, Stiglitz is University Professor at Columbia University. From 1997 until 2000, he was chief economist and senior vice president of development economics at the World Bank. The chair of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton administration, Stiglitz has taught at Stanford, Princeton, Yale and All Souls College, Oxford.

Stiglitz helped create a new branch of economics, the economics of information, exploring the consequences of information asymmetries and pioneering such pivotal concepts as adverse selection and moral hazard, which have now become standard tools not only of theorists, but of policy analysts. He has made major contributions to macro-economics and monetary theory, to development economics and trade theory, to public and corporate finance, to the theories of industrial organization and rural organization, and to the theories of welfare economics and of income and wealth distribution. In the 1980s, he helped revive interest in the economics of research and development.

His work has helped explain the circumstances in which markets do not work well, and how selective government intervention can improve their performance.

Recognized around the world as a leading economic educator, he has written textbooks that have been translated into more than a dozen languages. He founded one of the leading economics journals, The Journal of Economic Perspectives, and is the author of many books. His book Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton, June 2001) has been translated into 30 languages and is an international bestseller. His forthcoming book, Making Globalization Work, will be published by W.W. Norton in September 2006.

###

“Should We Believe in God?” Debate at Amherst College March 3

February 10, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—“Should We Believe in God?” is the provocative question that Peter van Inwagen, the John Cardinal O’Hara Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, and Michael Tooley, professor of philosophy at University of Colorado, Boulder, will debate at 4 p.m. on Friday, March 3, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Departments of Philosophy and Religion at Amherst College, the Willis D. Wood Fund and the Joseph Epstein Lecture Fund in Philosophy, the debate and a reception to follow are free and open to the public.

A graduate of the University of Toronto and Princeton University, Tooley has taught philosophy at the University of Miami and at the University of Western Australia, and has been a senior research fellow at the Australian National University. His books include Causation: A Realist Approach (1987), Causation (co-edited with Ernest Sosa, 1993), Time, Tense, and Causation (1997) and Analytical Metaphysics (1999). Forthcoming books include Knowledge of God (co-authored with Alvin Planting) and Causation.

Inwagen received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Rochester. His books include An Essay on Free Will (1983), Material Beings (1990), Metaphysics (1993), God, Knowledge, and Mystery (1995) and Ontology, Identity, and Modality (2001). Forthcoming is The Problem of Evil, which will contain the Gifford Lectures, delivered at St Andrews University in 2003. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Inwagen also has given the Wilde Lectures at Oxford, the Maurice Lectures at the University of London and the Stewart Lectures at Princeton.

###

Public School Activist Jonathan Kozol To Speak at Amherst College Feb. 20

February 7, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Jonathan Kozol, public school teacher, award-winning writer and educational activist, will speak about “The Shame of the Nation: Schools Still Separate and Unequal in America” on Monday, Feb. 20, at 8 p.m. in Johnson Chapel at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Office of the President and the Victor S. Johnson Lectureship Fund, Kozol’s talk is free and open to the public.

A working activist and also a perceptive theorist, Kozol documented his first year as a teacher in Death at an Early Age: The Destruction of the Hearts and Minds of Negro Children in the Boston Public Schools (1967), for which he received the National Book Award in 1968. He speaks from first-hand experiences that humanize social issues. For 40 years, Kozol has worked to expose racial inequalities in the education system and speak against the plight of disadvantaged children, bringing the plight of students in under-funded urban schools to the attention of the nation.

His literary work addresses the major educational problems connected to poverty, hunger and illiteracy. Kozol has written several award-winning books, including The Night is Dark and I am Far from Home (1975), Children of the Revolution: A Yankee Teacher in the Cuban Schools (1978), Illiterate America (1985) and Amazing Grace: the Lives of Children and the Conscience of a Nation (1995).

###

Brentano Quartet and Hsin-Yun Huang To Present Music at Amherst Feb. 24

February 6, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—In the fourth installment of the 2005-06 Music at Amherst Series, the Brentano String Quartet will return to Amherst College to perform a program of Mozart viola quintets, in the 250th anniversary year of the composer’s birth, with Hsin-Yun Huang, viola, on Friday, Feb. 24, at 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall.

The Brentano String Quartet—Mark Steinberg, violin; Serena Canin, violin; Misha Amory, viola; and Nina Maria Lee, cello—has been singled out for its technical brilliance, musical insight and stylistic elegance since its founding in 1992, receiving many international awards. Reviewer Paul Griffiths in The New York Times wrote “The Brentano String Quartet...is something special. Their music making is private, delicate and fresh, but by its very intimacy and importance it seizes attention.”

The Brentano became the first quartet-in-residence at Princeton University in 1999, and served as quartet-in-residence at New York University from 1995 until 2003. The quartet was in residence at Amherst College last year.

The latest information can be obtained from the Amherst College Concert Website. Admission to the concert is $22; senior citizens and Amherst College employees, $19; and students $5. For more information and brochures call the Concert Office at 413/542-2195, or e-mail concert manager Kevin Daly at kpdaly@amherst.edu.

###

Brookings Fellow Nicolas de Boisgrollier To Speak on Europe at Amherst College Feb. 6

February 3, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Nicolas de Boisgrollier, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution Center on the U.S. and Europe, will give a lecture titled “Does Europe Have Anything To Offer The World?” at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, in the Cole Assembly Room (Red Room) in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Department of Political Science at Amherst College, de Boisgrollier’s talk is free and open to the public.

de Boisgrollier is a graduate of the Institut d'études politiques de Paris (Sciences Po),
and has an M.A. degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and an M.B.A from the London Business School. He has taught at the Institut d'études politiques de Paris, the Center on the United States at IFRI (Institut Français des Relations Internationales) and as a Levy-Despas Fellow at Amherst College. He has also been a managing partner at Ruolz & Cie, director at Volubilis PLC, risk analyst at HSBC and banker at Banque Natexis.

de Boisgrollier has published widely on France, French foreign and defense policies, transatlantic relations, U.S. homeland security, U.S. foreign and national security policies, business and international relations.

###

Classicist Donald J. Mastronarde ’69 To Speak at Amherst College Feb. 23

February 3, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Donald J. Mastronarde ’69, the Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classical Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, will speak on “Some Aspects of Rhetoric and Character in Euripides” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. His talk and the reception to follow are sponsored by the Classics Department at Amherst College, and are free and open to the public.

Mastronarde graduated summa cum laude in 1969 from Amherst College, with a B.A. in classics. He attended Oxford University and received his Ph.D. in classics from the University of Toronto. He has taught at UC Berkeley since 1973 and was appointed Melpomene Distinguished Professor in 2001. He directs the Center for the Tebtunis Papyri at Berkeley and took over support of the GreekKeys font and input program for the American Philological Association in 2001, further developing the product through the transition to the standard font encoding known as Unicode. Mastronarde has published extensively on the ancient Athenian tragedian Euripides and various aspects of ancient drama, including interpretation, staging and dramatic technique, textual studies and commentaries.

Mastronarde is the author of the widely-used textbook Introduction to Attic Greek (1993) and an associated Website. He is also the editor of the Cambridge Medea (2002) and Phoenissae (2004) of Euripides.

###

Discussion of The Book of Tea at Amherst College Feb. 13

February 3, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—A round table discussion of “Okakura Kakuzō, The Book of Tea, and the Creation of a Japanese Art History,” will take place at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb.13, in Fayerweather 113 at Amherst College. The discussants will be Christopher Benfey, Mellon Professor of English at Mt. Holyoke College; Peter Grilli, the director of the Japan Society in Boston; and Anne Nishimura Morse, the curator of Japanese art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Free and open to the public, this event is sponsored by the Eastman Fund and the John Whitney Hall Fund.

###

Prison Activist Lori Pompa To Speak at Amherst College Feb. 6

February 3, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Temple University criminal justice instructor Lori Pompa will speak on “Exploring Issues of Crime and Justice from Inside the Walls” at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, in the Babbott Room in the Octagon at Amherst College. The first in a series of lectures on “Regulating Citizens: Prisons and the Future of Democratic Societies” sponsored by the Corliss Lamont Lectureship for a Peaceful World, Pompa’s talk is free and open to the public.

Pompa is the founder and director of the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, a program at Temple University that brings college students together with incarcerated men and women to study as peers in seminars behind prison walls. These courses allow students from both sides of the wall to rethink what they know about issues of crime and justice, and gain insights that will help them to take steps towards effecting social change.

Pompa was named a Soros Justice Senior Fellow in 2003, providing her the opportunity to develop Inside-Out into a model for national replication. She has taken thousands of students behind the prison walls to enter into dialogue with men and women imprisoned there. Going in and out of prisons for 20 years, she has included education, counseling, social work and advocacy in her work with incarcerated men and women. She is a licensed social worker with an MSW degree from Rutgers University.

###

Wilt Idema To Speak on Chinese Vernacular Literature at Amherst College Feb. 24

February 3, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Wilt Idema, the director of the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research of Harvard University, will speak on “The Accidental Observation of Naked Women in Chinese Literature” at 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 24, in Porter Lounge, Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations at Amherst College and the John Whitney Hall Fund, this event is free and open to the public.

A specialist in Chinese vernacular literature of the imperial period, Idema left the prestigious position of chair of Chinese Studies at Leiden University in Holland in 2000 for Harvard, where he is an associate professor of Chinese literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. His works include Chinese Theater, 1100-1450: A Source Book, Chinese Vernacular Fiction: the Formative Period and The Dramatic Oeuvre of Chu Yu-Tun (1379-1439). He also co-edited, with Lloyd Haft and Beata Grant respectively, two important anthologies, A Guide to Chinese Literature and The Red Brush: Writing Women Of Imperial China, and translated one of China’s most famous plays, The Moon and the Zither: the Story of the Western Wing.

###

Writer Alexander Chee To Read at Amherst College Feb. 6

February 2, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Novelist Alexander Chee will read from his work at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, in Fayerweather 113 at Amherst College. This event, sponsored by the Creative Writing Center, is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Alexander Chee’s first novel, Edinburgh, grapples with sexual damage, longing and the great cost of secrecy. The New York Times described the book as “haunting,” and Annie Dillard wrote, “Edinburgh has the force of a dream and the heft of a life. And Alexander Chee is a brilliant new writer.” That novel won the Lambda Editor’s Choice Prize, and Chee has also been awarded an NEA Fellowship and The Whiting Writer’s Award. He lives in Rochester, N. Y., and has completed a new novel, The Queen of the Night, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin in 2007.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center puts on a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. More information is available at the writing center’s Website.

###

Pages

 

Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu