Amherst College Choral Society To Present Commencement Concert May 27

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Amherst College Choral Society will present its annual Commencement concert at 9:15 p.m. on Saturday, May 27, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. The Choral Society, which includes the Women’s Chorus, the Men’s Glee Club and the Concert Choir, is directed by Mallorie Chernin and Rachel Dunham ’05, assistant director. The Madrigal Singers, directed by Katherine Willis ’07 and Jay Buchman ’07, also will perform.

The program will feature music from each group’s spring concert as well as traditional Amherst College songs.

Tickets are $6 for general admission and $3 for senior citizens, children 12 and under and Amherst College students. Tickets may be reserved by calling 413/542-2484 or may be purchased at the lobby of Converse Hall during Commencement registration or at the door the evening of the performance. Remaining tickets will be available in the lobby of the Arms Music Center the evening of the performance.

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Amherst College Graduate Max Rettig To Study in Rwanda on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Max Rettig, a 2005 graduate of Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in Rwanda.

In his Fulbright proposal, Rettig wrote that he wants to continue the work that he began with his senior thesis at Amherst, on justice in Rwanda after the 1994 genocide. He will observe the local community-based trials that the Rwandans call gacaca. The word means “grass,” and the process is meant to “promote justice, reconciliation and national unity. Based on a system of plea-bargaining, gacaca would allow those who confess their crimes to halve their sentences by performing community service.” Currently a research associate at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University, Rettig studied law, jurisprudence and social thought at Amherst, where he received a B.A. degree summa cum laude in 2005, and a Five College certificate in African studies. He expects to graduate with a J.D. degree from Columbia University Law School in 2010. He plans a career in human rights.

Rettig received the Edward Jones Prize at Amherst for the outstanding thesis dealing with Africa, and also the Robert Cover Award for achievement in law, jurisprudence and social thought. The editor of The Indicator, a college social and political journal, Rettig also contributed to The Amherst Student, the student weekly, and worked as a writing tutor and writing assistant. He played varsity tennis at Amherst, and was the team captain.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Graduate Ryan Park To Study in South Korea on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Ryan Park, a 2005 graduate of Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in South Korea.

Currently working as a paralegal in an honors program at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., Park studied economics and political science at Amherst, where he received a B.A. degree—and the Thomas H. Wyman 1951 Medal for scholarship, citizenship and character—in 2005. He was the president of the Association of Amherst Students, the student government, for three years. He plans to teach English in South Korea; as he wrote in his Fulbright proposal, “my overriding goal is simply to be a great teacher of the English language and a respected ambassador of the United States.” Park plans a career in higher education or public service, after graduate school when he returns from South Korea. He also plans to work on a research project on “Martyrdom and Evangelical Christianity.”

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Professor Wendy Woodson To Work in Australia as Senior Fulbright Scholar

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Wendy Woodson, a professor of theater and dance at Amherst College, has been selected as a Senior Fulbright Scholar for the 2006-07 academic year. Woodson will be an artist-in-residence at the Victoria College of the Arts at the University of Melbourne in Australia in the spring 2007 semester. Woodson will create new performance and video work that continues her interest in stories and images of reconciliation and meditation, and in experimental interactions between live performance and digital technologies.

A member of the Amherst faculty since 1987, Woodson is also the founder and artistic director of Present Company, a non-profit interdisciplinary touring ensemble. She has created 80 works for stage and video that have been performed throughout the U.S. and in Europe, in such venues as the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Emerson Majestic Theater, Jacob’s Pillow, Wolf Trap and the DeCordova Museum. She has received numerous awards for her work, including fellowships and grants in choreography, playwriting and video from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the D.C. Commission on Arts & Humanities and the Mid-Atlantic Arts Consortium, among others. She earned B.A. and M.A. degrees from the George Washington University, and trained in theater and dance with Erick Hawkins, Martha Graham, Meredith Monk, Twyla Tharp and many others.

Fulbright Senior Scholar awards are given by the Australian-American Fulbright Commission to American citizens to engage in four to six months of research or teaching at an Australian institution. Since 1949, the commission has worked to“to further mutual understanding between the people of Australia and the United States through educational and cultural exchange.”

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Amherst College Senior Adam Lewkowitz To Study in Mexico on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Adam Lewkowitz, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in Mexico. Lewkowitz, a graduate of the Phoenix Country Day School, is the son of Herman and Catherine Lewkowitz of Phoenix, Ariz.

A sociology and Spanish major at Amherst, Lewkowitz wrote in his Fulbright proposal that he hopes to continue in Mexico the work he began in Arizona for his honors thesis, in which he examined the question, do “social stigmas within Mexican communities affect the process of assimilation?” At Tijuana’s El Collegio de la Frontera Norte, the leading Mexican university in border relations, he will try to discover if “the aversion to becoming Americanized stems from Mexican society.”

At Amherst, Lewkowitz was not only an outstanding swimmer and captain of the team. He was one of 27 students from across the country selected for the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program, a preliminary acceptance to medical school that will enable him to fulfill his vocational dream of becoming a doctor while pursuing a passion for the humanities as an undergraduate. Lewkowitz expects to receive his M.D. degree in 2011, and also to earn a Masters of Public Health degree. He hopes to return to Phoenix to work as a physician in a bilingual community.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Senior Alana Laudone To Study in China on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Alana Laudone, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in China. Laudone, a graduate of Glastonbury High School, is the daughter of Vincent and Katharyn Laudone of South Glastonbury, Conn.

A graduate in Mandarin Chinese of the Rassias Accelerated Language Program at Dartmouth College, where she also taught for three summers, Laudone has studied Asian languages and civilizations at Amherst. She also will receive a Five College certificate in international relations in May. In China next year at Xinjiang University, she plans to explore the cultural dynamic of the Uighur people, a mainly Islamic Turkic ethnic group. She asked in her Fulbright proposal, “How does a small minority culture survive in the face of such a dominant majority culture” as the Han Chinese?

At Amherst, Laudone has chaired Youth Action International, a fund-raising group that focuses on African issues, and has been active in the Asian Students Association. She also has worked in the college archives, the library archives, the dining hall and as a tutor. She sang with the Amherst Women’s Chorus and the Sabrinas, an a capella singing group.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Senior James Seltzer To Study in Japan on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—James Seltzer, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in Japan. Seltzer, a graduate of Boston College High School, is the son of Norman Seltzer and Colleen Young of Hull, Mass.

Seltzer fashioned an interdisciplinary major at Amherst, combining studies in Japanese, fine arts and computer science. As his senior thesis, he and his twin brother Julian Seltzer, also a senior at Amherst, created Cross-War: Beginnings, an animated film. Their film is part of a projected series on which James Seltzer will work next year in Tokyo. In his Fulbright proposal, Seltzer described “a technical work of art in which philosophical undertones shine through gracefully, capturing and inviting audiences of all ages. This all-inclusive work will seek to answer the larger question of why animation is so often dismissed as childlike by American culture, in addition to why Japanese audiences take this art form so seriously.”

Seltzer played football and was a member of the track team for three years at Amherst. As a junior with the Temple University Program in Japan, he played basketball and tutored Japanese students in English. Back at Amherst, he now tutors undergraduates in 3-D computer animation techniques.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Senior Jenny Horowitz To Study in Spain on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Jenny Horowitz, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship for postgraduate study in Spain. Horowitz, a graduate of Newton South High School, is the daughter of Eva and Jonathan Horowitz of Waban, Mass.

Her major area of study at Amherst is European studies; Horowitz is writing a senior thesis on the role of Spanish public schools in identity formation. Last summer she taught underprivileged 8-year-olds in Barcelona. In the U.S., she has taught in a prison in Greenfield, Mass. and a summer program for Boston middle school students. Horowitz wrote in her Fulbright proposal that she has been “continually drawn to three things: challenges, teaching and exploration.” She will teach in Spain and plans an eventual career in education administration or policy.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Senior Robert Cooke To Study in Germany on Fulbright Grant

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Robert Cooke, a senior at Amherst College, has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship to serve as an assistant language instructor in Lower Saxony. Cooke, a graduate of Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School, is the son of John and Nancy Cooke of South Yarmouth, Mass.

With a German and philosophy double major at Amherst, Cooke plans to become a German professor one day, and looks forward to spending a year in Germany teaching English and participating in “cultural conversations,” as he wrote in his Fulbright proposal. The captain of the Amherst College Sailing Club, Cooke also has taught sailing on Cape Cod. He was chosen “Most Valuable Sailor” twice, and has been a member of the college’s German house. Cooke transferred to Amherst as a junior from Hampshire College.

Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946 to foster mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchanges. Senator J. William Fulbright, sponsor of the legislation, viewed scholarship as an alternative to armed conflict. Today the Fulbright Program, the federal government’s premier scholarship program, funded by an annual Congressional appropriation and contributions from other participating countries, allows Americans to study or conduct research in more than 100 nations.

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Amherst College Sophomore Edward Ramos Selected as 2006 Goldman Sachs Global Leader

May 5, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Edward Ramos, a sophomore at Amherst College, has been selected as a 2006 Goldman Sachs Global Leader by the Goldman Sachs Foundation and the Institute of International Education (IIE). For the past five years, the Goldman Sachs Foundation has been identifying and developing some of the most promising future leaders; Ramos is one of 100 outstanding second-year students around the world selected this spring from over 70 of the top colleges and universities. A graduate of J.R. Masterman High School, Ramos is the son of Victor and Theresa Ramos of Philadelphia, Pa. Ramos will receive a grant for educational expenses at Amherst.

Of Peruvian ancestry, Ramos launched the Peru-America Cultural Exchange program, which organized intercultural exchange trips for soccer players to the small Andean town of Carhuaz. At Amherst, he founded Summer English in the Andes, a program that will bring seven college students to Peru to teach English to young children. Ramos is pursuing a major in history at Amherst and plans to go to law school.

Last summer Ramos researched the effect of volatile organic compounds on ozone production on a Howard Hughes Medical Institute grant. In high school, he received a number of awards, including the National Hispanic Heritage Youth Award for Engineering and Mathematics, the AXA Achievement Award for Pennsylvania and the World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia scholarship. Cited by the Philadelphia City Council and Pennsylvania State Legislature for scholarship and community service, Ramos was a math tutor in high school.

“Global Leaders are extremely talented academically and have already shown proven leadership abilities and a strong interest in global affairs,” said Stephanie Bell-Rose, president of the foundation, as she announced the 20 U.S. and Canadian 2006 Goldman Sachs Global Leaders. “Goldman Sachs and IIE created this program to help these promising young people develop their leadership skills and goals—at a critical juncture in their academic careers—in order to become even more effective agents of change.”

In addition, 50 of this year’s 100 Global Leaders, including 10 from U.S. and Canadian universities, will also be selected to participate in the annual Goldman Sachs Global Leadership Institute in July in New York City. They will spend time with leaders from the private, public and nonprofit sectors, learning about leadership and global issues. Past speakers have included experts in leadership, diplomats from the United Nations, executives from Goldman Sachs and other private companies and leaders of influential NGOs, including the International Crisis Group and the International Rescue Committee.

The Goldman Sachs Foundation is a global philanthropic organization funded by The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. The foundation promotes excellence and innovation in education and works to improve the academic performance and lifelong productivity of young people worldwide. It achieves this mission through a combination of strategic partnerships, grants, loans, private sector investments, and the deployment of professional talent from Goldman Sachs. Funded in 1999, the foundation has awarded grants of $72 million since its inception, providing opportunities for young people in more than 20 countries. The foundation has a Website at www.gs.com/foundation.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) is the world leader in the international exchange of people and ideas. Its expertise enables institutions and individuals to build capacity in their home countries and regions. IIE designs and implements more than 200 programs of study and training for students, educators, young professionals and trainees from all sectors with funding from government and private sources. These programs include the Fulbright Student and Scholar programs and the Humphrey Fellowships, administered for the Department of State; and the People, Energy, and Development Program administered for the U.S. Agency for International Development; as well as corporate training and scholarship programs. IIE has a Website at www.iie.org.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu