Abdulaziz Sachedina To Discuss the Origins of Shiism at Amherst College Dec. 7

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Abdulaziz Sachedina, a professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia, has been giving a series of lectures at Amherst College this fall on “The Ideals and Realities of the Islamic Community.” Sachedina will present the final lecture, “Modern Theological-Juridical Shiite leadership” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 7, in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Free and open to the public, the talk is sponsored by the religion department and the Willis D. Wood Fund.

Sachedina, author of Islamic Roots of Democratic Pluralism, is professor of Islamic and Shi’ite Studies, theological and juridical studies in the department of religious studies at the University of Virginia. He was educated at the University of Toronto, the Aligarh Muslim University in India and the Ferdowski University in Iran. He has taught in Canada at Wilfred Laurier, Waterloo and McGill Universities, at Haverford College and at the University of Jordan, Amman. Born to a West Indian family in Tanzania, Sachedina has been praised for his reassertion of “Islam’s potential as a source of tolerance and pluralism” (Middle East Journal). A prominent member of the Islamic Roots of Democratic Pluralism objective within the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Sachedina works to bring knowledge of Islam as a peace-building religion to the general public. He is currently conducting a study titled “Islamic Law for Muslim Physicians: The Spiritual Foundations of Biomedical Ethics in Islam.”

###

Amherst College Jazz Ensemble to Perform at Buckley Recital Hall on Dec. 1; Additional Jazz Concerts Dec. 4, 6, 8

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— On Friday, Dec. 1, at 8 p.m., the Amherst College Jazz Ensemble will perform in Buckley Recital Hall of the Arms Music Building at Amherst College, kicking off a string of jazz concerts that will run throughout the month of December. The Jazz Ensemble, directed by Bruce Diehl, will liven up Buckley with musical selections by Count Basie, George Banson, Santiago Cerda, Thelonious Monk, Les Hooper and others. Several students, especially seniors, will perform as featured soloists. The concert, sponsored by the Amherst College Music Department, is free and open to the public.

The music department will also feature three other concerts on December 4, 6 and 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the Friedmann Room of the Amherst College Keefe Campus Center. These concerts will feature original jazz compositions, arrangements and tunes drawn from the American songbook. For more information, please contact Bruce Diehl at 413/542-8303 or visit the Jazz@Amherst Website.

###

Christmas Vespers at Amherst College Dec. 3

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The annual Christmas Vespers service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 3, at 4 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. in Johnson Chapel at Amherst College. The “Festival of Lessons and Carols” is sponsored by the Amherst College Christian Fellowship, the Newman Club and the Protestant and Roman Catholic Religious Advisors. Admission is free, and the public is invited.

Mallorie Chernin will direct the Amherst College Choral Society, assisted by Kate Vogele, Mount Holyoke College ’06. Jay Buchman ’06 and Elly Jessop ’08 will direct the Amherst College Madrigal Singers. Other musicians will include organist James Maes and trumpeters Douglas Purcell and David Reinhardt ’09, both of the Amherst College Music Department.

The Choral Society will perform music of Richard Zgodava, David Wilcock, Javier Busto, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, Eric Whitacre and others. Members of the college community will read the scripture lessons. The congregation will be asked to join in the singing of traditional carols and the “Hallelujah Chorus” from Handel’s Messiah.

###

Discussion of "Should The New York Times be Prosecuted under the Espionage Statutes?" at Amherst College Dec. 6

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Political essayist Gabriel Schoenfeld and George Freeman ’71, the assistant general counsel at The New York Times, will discuss “Should The New York Times Be Prosecuted under the Espionage Statutes?” at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 6, in the Paino Lecture Hall in the Earth Sciences Building at Amherst College. One in a series of lectures sponsored by the Colloquium on the American Founding at Amherst, the talk is free and open to the public.

The author of The Return of Anti-Semitism (2004), which Publishers’ Weekly praised for its “pungent, well-written, argumentative analysis,” Schoenfeld has written on world affairs for The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, the New Republic and other publications, including Commentary magazine, where he is the senior editor.

A graduate of Harvard Law School, Freeman is an adjunct professor at New York University, where he teaches media law. He has taught at the University of Miami Law School and served as assistant to the dean at Vermont Law School. As assistant general counsel of the Times since 1992, Freeman has been involved in newsroom counseling, antitrust and distribution problems, employment relations and business counseling involving all divisions of the Times. Currently chair of the American Bar Association’s Litigation Section’s First Amendment and Media Litigation Committee and past chair of the ABA’s Forum on Communication Law, Freeman has also chaired the New York State Bar Association Media Law Committee and is a frequent lecturer on First Amendment issues.

###

Kwanzaa Celebration at Amherst College Dec. 3

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College will present its annual Kwanzaa celebration at 12 noon on Sunday, Dec. 3, in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Dean of Students Office and the Black Students Union at the college, the program and traditional feast are free and open to the public.

From the Swahili phrase “matunda ya kwanza,” meaning “first fruits,” Kwanzaa is the week-long African-American holiday observance held from Dec. 26 to Jan.1. Founded in 1966 by Ron Karenga (Ron Everett), Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, but a cultural one based on the first harvest celebrations celebrated in Africa. The seven days of Kwanzaa are dedicated to seven principles: Umoja (unity), Kujichagulia (self-determination), Ujima (collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (cooperative economics), Nia (purpose), Kuumba (creativity) and Imani (faith).

###

Poet Peter Covino '85 to Read at Amherst College Dec. 7

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Poet Peter Covino, a 1985 graduate of Amherst College and author of two collections of poems, will read at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 7, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Of Covino’s collection, Cut Off the Ears of Winter, W.S. DiPiero has said, “These poems are acts of discovery.” Donald Revell says, “Here are psalms against the sinister. Here, too, are eclogues of mercy.[…] This is a book of virtues better far than our deserving.”

Born and raised in Italy, Covino earned an M.S. degree from the Columbia School of Social Work after graduating from Amherst. He now teaches English and creative writing at the University of Rhode Island. His poems have appeared in Colorado Review, Columbia, The Journal, The Paris Review, Verse and The Penguin Book of Italian American Writing. He is one of the founding editors of Barrow Street and Barrow Street Press. Covino’s chapbook, Straight Boyfriend, received the Frank O’Hara Prize in Poetry in 2001.

The Amherst College Creative Writing Center sponsors a yearly reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. For more information, please call 413/542-8200 or visit the center's website.

###

Russian Folk Songs in Memory of Yulya Zapolskaya at Amherst Center for Russian Culture Dec. 10

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— The Amherst Center for Russian Culture will present: “Yulya’s Song: The Love, Life and Art of a Russian-American Singer and Songwriter” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 10, in the Center for Russian Culture in Webster Hall at Amherst College.

The program will present a songbook commemorating the Russian singer Yulya Zapolskaya, late wife of Thomas Whitney ’37, the founder of the Amherst Center for Russian Culture. The performance will feature Yelena Dudochkin, voice; Jakov Jakoulov, piano; and Roman Yakub, narrator. The concert and a reception to follow are free and open to the public.

###

Stephen Nissenbaum To Speak on “Christmas With the Dickinsons” at Amherst College Dec. 7

November 30, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—The Emily Dickinson Museum: The Homestead and The Evergreens will present a lecture by historian and author Stephen Nissenbaum on “Christmas with the Dickinsons: Bedpost Stockings and Laurel Wreaths” at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 7, at the Amherst College Alumni House on Spring Street. The talk is free and open to the public.

From the stocking hung on Emily Dickinson’s bedpost when she was a girl to the scandalous hanging of laurel wreaths on the front door at The Evergreens, Christmas in the Dickinson family did not go unnoticed. The talk will discuss the changing meanings of Christmas in 19th-century America through the practices of two generations of the Dickinson family.

Stephen Nissenbaum is the author of The Battle for Christmas (1996), a finalist that year for the Pulitzer Prize, and a number of other notable books. He is professor emeritus of history at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and an adjunct professor at the University of Vermont. He has been awarded several major fellowships during his career and is an elected member of both the American Antiquarian Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society. For the past several years he has been among the distinguished lecturers at the Organization of American Historians. For decades, Nissenbaum has been a consultant, on- and off-camera, to many humanities films aired on PBS and the History Channel. He has served as president of the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities and been a member of the advisory boards of Historic Deerfield, Inc., and the Emily Dickinson Homestead.

The Emily Dickinson Museum: The Homestead and The Evergreens is owned by the Trustees of Amherst College. The museum has a separate board of governors and, with limited support from the college, is expected to fund its operating and capital improvement objectives independently. Through December 1, the museum is open Wednesday and Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m. On Saturday, Dec. 9, from 1 to 4 p.m., the museum will offer its final program of the year, the annual Emily Dickinson Birthday Open House, this year with hints of Christmas. The Emily Dickinson Museum is a member of Museums10, a partnership of 10 museums in the Pioneer Valley. For more information about the museum, please call 413/542-8161 or visit the the museum's website.

###

Teach for America Founder Wendy Kopp to Speak at Amherst College on Dec. 4

November 15, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Wendy Kopp, founder and president of the national teacher corps Teach for America, will give a talk titled “One Day, All Children: The Unlikely Triumph of Teach for America and What I Learned Along the Way” in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 4. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Teach for America—an organization that recruits outstanding recent college graduates to teach for two years in the nation’s underprivileged urban and rural public schools—strives for a long-term goal that one day all children will have access to quality education. Kopp considers college graduates to be the driving force: “There is no doubt that our country will be a better place if we can find new ways of inspiring more of our nation’s most sought-after young people to pursue civil service,” she says. “Their persistent idealism, fresh perspectives and endless energy will help us conquer both the new challenges facing our nation and the old and intransigent ones that have plagued us for decades.” TFA is an initiative that Kopp began in 1989 as an extension of her senior thesis at Princeton, and from its humble beginnings the organization has grown into one of the top 10 employers of college graduates in the country, with 4,400 corps members and 12,000 alumni who reach 25 communities across the nation.

Kopp serves on the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation, the boards of The New Teacher Project and the KIPP Foundation, and the advisory boards of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and the National Council on Teacher Quality. In 1993 she became the youngest person and first woman to receive Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson Award, the highest honor the school confers on its undergraduate alumni. In 1994, Time magazine identified her as one of the country’s 40 most promising leaders under 40. She holds a B.A. degree from Princeton University, where she participated in the undergraduate program of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

###

Philosopher Peter Kivy To Speak on “First the Music, then the Words” at Amherst College Nov. 30

November 13, 2006
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Peter Kivy, the Board of Governors Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University, will give a talk on the topic “First the Music, then the Words: Philosophical Reflections of a ‘Philosophical’ Opera” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 30, in Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. Organized by the Amherst College department of philosophy and funded by the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science, Kivy’s talk is free and open to the public.

Kivy’s field is aesthetics and the philosophy of art. His early work is represented by The Seventh Sense: Francis Hutcheson and Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics (1976, second edition 2003). In the early ’70s, he worked in Anglo-American analytic aesthetics, writing on the problems surrounding Frank Sibley’s seminal paper on “Aesthetic Concepts.”

In the late ’70s Kivy turned his attention to the philosophical problem of the emotions in music. The philosophy of music is now his principal interest, although he still works in the 18th century and in contemporary analytic aesthetics. The music project resulted in the publication of five books, dealing with musical expression, musical representation, opera, pure instrumental music and musical performance.

In his most recent book, Philosophies of Arts (1997), Kivy departed somewhat from the musical problems, and tried to deal with issues centering on how the various arts differ. This has led him to become deeply interested in the philosophy of literature. His most recent book is The Possessor and the Possessed: Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and the Idea of Musical Genius (2001).

###

Pages

 

Contact

Office Communications
(413) 542-2321
comm@amherst.edu


eNews

eNewsSubscribe to the biweekly eNews by emailing alumni@amherst.edu.