Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona To Speak on Public Health April 1 at Amherst College

March 21, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Vice Admiral Richard Carmona, recently retired Surgeon General of the United States, will deliver a lecture titled “Parting Words from a Surgeon General: Addressing Public Health Concerns” at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Carmona will speak on his role as Surgeon General in eliminating health disparities and increasing health literacy in underserved communities. SSponsored by the Schwemm Lecture Fund, the Association of Amherst Students, the Office of the President, the Martin Luther, Jr. King Day Committee and the Charles Drew Health Professions Society at Amherst, Carmona’s talk will be free and open to the public.

Appointed the nation’s chief medical officer by President George W. Bush in 2002, Carmona had taken a challenging path to becoming Surgeon General. Born into a poor Puerto Rican immigrant family in New York City, he experienced firsthand the impact of disparities in health care and learned the relationships between culture, health, education and economic status.

After dropping out of high school and enlisting in the U.S. Army in 1967, Carmona received his Army General Equivalency Diploma, joined the Special Forces, became a combat-decorated Vietnam veteran and began his career in medicine. After leaving active duty, Carmona attended Bronx Community College of the City University of New York, where he earned his associate of arts degree. He later graduated from the University of California, San Francisco, with a B.S. degree (1977) and medical degree (1979). At the University of California Medical School, Carmona was awarded the prestigious gold-headed cane as the top graduate. He has also earned an M.A. in public health from the University of Arizona (1998).

Carmona has worked in various positions in the medical field including paramedic, registered nurse and physician He completed a surgical residency at the University of California, San Francisco, and a National Institutes of Health-sponsored fellowship in trauma, burns and critical care. Carmona is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and is also certified in correctional health care and in quality assurance. Prior to being named Surgeon General, Carmona was the chairman of the State of Arizona Southern Regional Emergency Medical System, a professor of surgery, public health and family and community medicine at the University of Arizona and the Pima County Sheriff's Department surgeon and deputy sheriff.

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Composer and Music Theorist Dmitri Tymoczko To Speak on "Composition as Applied Philiosophy" at Amherst College April 12

March 16, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Dmitri Tymoczko, a composer and music theorist, will give a talk on “Composition as Applied Philosophy” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 12, in Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Organized by the Amherst College Department of Philosophy and funded by the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science, Tymoczko’s talk is free and open to the public.

A composer, music theorist and professor at Princeton University, Dmitri Tymoczko is interested in contemporary tonal music. As a composer, he writes music that draws on a range of traditions, including impressionism, minimalism, jazz and rock. As a theorist, he is interested in understanding what makes music sound good. In recent work, he showed that musical chords have a precise geometrical structure and that composers in a range of styles have exploited the non-Euclidean features of this geometry.

Tymoczko’s music has won numerous prizes and awards, including a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Eisner Award from the University of California at Berkeley, and fellowships from Tanglewood, the Ernest Bloch Music Festival, Princeton University and the Mannes Institute for Advanced Studies in Music Theory. His music has been performed by the Brentano Quartet, the Network for New Music, the Synergy Vocal Ensemble and others. His writing has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, Boston Review and Music Theory Spectrum.

A native of Northampton, Mass., Tymoczko received a B.A. degree at Harvard University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of California at Berkeley.

The Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science was established in 1983 by Carol Micken and John I. Forry ’66 to promote the study of issues in the philosophy and history of science, as well as the study of philosophical issues arising out of new developments in the sciences, including economics and mathematics.

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Lazerowitz Lecturer Laure Katsaros To Speak April 19 at Amherst College on Bachelors and Prostitutes in 19th-Century France

March 16, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417


AMHERST, Mass.—Laure Katsaros, assistant professor of French at Amherst College, will give the annual Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lecture at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, in the Alumni House at Amherst College. Katsaros will speak about “Men of Leisure, Women of Pleasure: Bachelors and Prostitutes in 19th-Century France.” The talk is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow.

Katsaros has recently completed a book manuscript titled “New York-Paris: Whitman, Baudelaire, and the Hybrid City,” and she is currently working on a new book manuscript on prostitutes and bachelors in 19th-century France. In this new book, she draws from popular culture as well as from literary works, ranging from Balzac to Zola, to analyze the pairing of bachelors and prostitutes in 19th-century bourgeois culture.

Katsaros has been teaching at Amherst since 2002. She has also taught French at Boston College, English at Université Paris Nord XIII and American Studies at Université Aix Marseille I. She is a graduate of École Normale Supérieure in Paris (rue d’Ulm). She holds a Ph.D. degree in comparative literature from Yale University and a doctorate in American studies from Université Paris VII.

The Lazerowitz Lectureship is awarded each year to support and encourage members of the Amherst College faculty in their scholarly work. The Dean of the Faculty, in conjunction with the lecture committee, selects the recipient, a member of the faculty below the rank of a full professor, who presents a lecture on his or her research.

The Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lectureship was established in 1985 to honor the parents of the late Morris Lazerowitz, emeritus professor of philosophy at Smith College.

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Howard Gardner, Theorist of Multiple Intelligences, To Speak at Amherst College March 29

March 14, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Howard Gardner, MacArthur Fellow and the author of Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons, will speak on “What Does College Have to Do With Meaningful Work in a Meaningful Life?” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 29, in the Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Victor S. Johnson Lectureship Fund, Gardner’s talk is free and open to the public.

The John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the senior director of Harvard Project Zero, Gardner is best known for his theory of multiple intelligences, a critique of the notion that there exists a single human intelligence that can be assessed by standard measures. During the past two decades, Gardner and his colleagues at Project Zero have been working on the design of performance-based assessments, education for understanding, the use of multiple intelligences to achieve more personalized curriculum and the nature of interdisciplinary efforts in education.

In collaboration with psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and William Damon, Gardner has been studying GoodWork—work that is at once excellent in quality and also socially responsible. The GoodWork Project (www.goodworkproject.org) includes studies of outstanding leaders in journalism, law, science, medicine, theater and philanthropy, and an examination of exemplary institutions and organizations. The first book to issue from this research was Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet (2000).

Gardner’s books include Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century (1999), The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and Standardized Tests (2000), Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing our Own and Other People’s Minds (2004), Making Good: How Young People Cope with Moral Dilemmas at Work (2004, with Wendy Fischman, Becca Solomon and Deborah Greenspan) and Multiple Intelligences (2006). Five Minds for the Future will be published in April.

The Victor S. Johnson Lectureship Fund was established in memory of Victor S. Johnson (1882-1943) by his sons for the purpose of “bringing to the campus each year a stimulating individual worthy of the lectureship’s purpose of serving the best tradition of the liberal arts and individual freedom.”

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Amherst College Psychology Professor Catherine Sanderson Authors "Slow and Steady Parenting"

March 13, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417


AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College Associate Professor of Psychology Catherine Sanderson has authored a new book, Slow and Steady Parenting: Active Childraising for the Long Haul, from Birth to Age 3 (M. Evans, 2005, 166 pp.).

Sanderson’s groundbreaking work teaches parents that following the quick-fix, “whatever works now” parenting solutions proposed by many other books may lead to a lack of independence and confidence in a child’s self-image. Sanderson’s work, based on the most current research, explains that the road to successful parenting is slow and steady. The book outlines important lessons and helpful advice for dealing with everyday parenting situations, decreasing parent-child struggles and enhancing children’s physical and psychological well-being. Based on the principle that “slow and steady wins the race,” this is a manual for raising children in today’s world of immediate gratification.

Sanderson is an associate professor of psychology at Amherst College. A graduate of Stanford University, she received her Ph.D. degree in social psychology in 1997 from Princeton University. Sanderson has authored numerous articles, and has been teaching at Amherst College since 1997. A mother of three, she lives in the town of Amherst.

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Dramatic Opera "Our American Cousin" Will Have World Premiere at Amherst College on March 31

March 13, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College will present the premiere concert performance of the new opera Our American Cousin at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, in Buckley Recital Hall of the Arms Music Building at Amherst College. The composer of Our American Cousin is Eric Sawyer, an assistant professor of music at Amherst; the librettist is John Shoptaw. The performance is free, but reservations are recommended. Tickets may be reserved by e-mail to oacpremiere@gmail.com, or by phone at 413/542-2195.

Performed with the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, the opera will be presented as a semi-staged, concert performance with stage direction by Linda McInerney and lights by Cathy Couch. The cast is led by local talents Janna Baty and Alan Schneider, and the orchestra is conducted by Gil Rose. The Amherst College Concert Choir, directed by Mallorie Chernin, will provide choral support.

Sawyer’s new opera takes place in Ford’s Theatre on the night of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, and tells the story of that historic night from the perspective both of the actors performing the Broadway comedy and the President who watches it. The opera explores the convergence of theater and history, and juxtaposes the plot of this period comedy with the tumultuous aftermath of the Civil War. It manifests the age-old theme of art imitating nature, for just as the play Lincoln was watching never reached its dramatic climax, the legacy of our nation’s history remains unfinished as well.

A member of the Amherst College faculty since 2002, Eric Sawyer is an accomplished chamber pianist. He has performed in New York’s Weill and Merkin concert halls and at Tanglewood, as well as in England, France, Germany and recently in Romania and Bulgaria. Sawyer has received the Joseph Bearns Prize, a First Music commission from the New York Youth Symphony, and awards from the Tanglewood Music Center and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has held fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Harvard University and has taught at some of the nation’s top universities. Sawyer received his B.A. degree from Harvard University and finished his graduate studies at Columbia University and the University of California, Davis.

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Jazz and Java: Thursday Night Jazz Returns to Schwemm’s Gourmet Coffee House

March 13, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417


AMHERST, Mass.—Live jazz will return to Schwemm’s Gourmet Coffee House in the Keefe Campus Center at Amherst College on Thursday nights this semester, with music provided by Amherst College students and Amherst and Five College faculty. With support from the Dean of Student Activities, the Campus Center, Jazz @ Amherst and interested faculty and students, the shows are free and open to the public. Information is posted on the Jazz at Amherst Website at www.amherst.edu/~jazz. Jazz at Schwemm’s will run from 9:30 until 11 p.m. on two Thursday nights.

On Thursday, March 15, the Supreme Court and Unshaded, both Amherst College Jazz Combos, will perform.

On Thursday, April 19, Black Coffee and The Bagelry, both Amherst College Jazz Combos, will perform.

The brainchild of Alex Rodriguez ’07, Jazz at Schwemm’s is a chance for Amherst community members to share their talents alongside the talented Amherst College jazz musicians. Though not intended as a weekly jam session, it is anticipated that several of the performing groups will invite select Amherst students to sit in. More important to the vision of this series is the chance to grow and nourish a thriving jazz community on campus and throughout the Pioneer Valley.

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“Life is Art/Art is Life”: Amherst College Artists in Residence Discuss Working with Communities March 29 and April 19

March 13, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417


AMHERST, Mass.—This spring, Amherst College will host a lecture series titled “Life is Art/Art is Life,” in which the college’s artists in residence speak about their community involvement. Photographer Dawoud Bey will speak at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 29, in the Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115) at Amherst College. Public artist Brett Cook will speak at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, in the same location. These talks, components of a three-part lecture series sponsored by the Office of the President at Amherst College, began with a lecture by multi-dimensional artist Emily Jacir on March 8 and are free and open to the public.

Brett Cook received his B.A. degree in the practice of art along with a minor in education from the University of California at Berkley in 1991. Since then he has shown his work in museums and galleries across the country while simultaneously launching public projects to interact with local communities. These projects have been carried out in cities across America, from California to Maine, and internationally in Brazil, Barbados and Mexico. Some are commissioned by museums and other public agencies, while others begin as self-initiated interventions on abandoned spaces. Cook has received high honors for his work, including residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, the Studio Museum in Harlem and the Headland Center for the Arts in Marin, Calif.

Dawoud Bey began his career as a photographer in 1975 with a series titled “Harlem, USA” that was later included in his first one-person exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. Since then he has exhibited his work internationally, including shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Barbican Center, the National Portrait Gallery in London and the Yale Art Gallery. In 1995, he published Dawoud Bey: Portraits 1975-1995, a series of color and black-and-white photographs, in conjunction with an exhibition held at the Walker Art Center. His latest project, Class Pictures, will be published in 2007 as part of a traveling exhibition of his work. Bey’s works are included in permanent exhibitions in museums both in America and Europe. He has received many awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. He currently teaches at Columbia College in Chicago and is represented by the Rhonda Hoffman Gallery in Chicago.

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Concert of “Musical Orientalism” Art Songs at Amherst College March 14

March 8, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Local tenor Peter W. Shea, accompanied by soprano Brenda McDonald, pianist Gregory Hayes and Amherst College students Octavia Foarta ’07 and James Montana ’07 as narrators, will present an afternoon of lieder from Goethe’s West-Eastern Divan at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, March 14, in the Center for Russian Culture in Webster Hall at Amherst College. The Amherst College Department of German, the European Studies Program and the Eastman Fund are sponsors of the concert, which is free and open to the public.

Primarily based on Goethe’s cycle of poems from “Book Suleika” in West-Öestlicher Divan, the concert will feature composers such as Franz Schubert, Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Robert Schumann, Hugo Wolf and others. Whether in playful oriental masks, amorous dialogue, passionate confession or voluntary submission, the spiritual joining of the poet Hatem and his beloved young Suleika comes to a climax in the lovers’ dialogues or duo-dramas, which will also be performed in spoken language. A side-by-side program booklet of the lieder texts and their English translations will be available at the concert.

Peter W. Shea, whose musical interests include art song and vocal chamber music of all eras, is a frequent tenor soloist with groups such as the Arcadia Players Baroque Orchestra, the Hampshire Choral Society and the Brattleboro Community Chorus. He has sung professionally since 1972, throughout New England and the Hudson Valley. Brenda McDonald, praised for her clear soprano voice, is currently the music director at Trinity Episcopal Church in Shrewsbury, Mass. Her recent operatic roles have included Pamina in Die Zauberflöte and Adele in Die Fledermaus. Greg Hayes is a senior lecturer in music at Dartmouth College and was previously on the faculties at Smith and Mount Holyoke colleges. A pianist and harpsichordist, he conducts the Da Camera Singers in Amherst, and performs regularly with the New England Bach Festival, the Vermont Symphony and the Mohawk Trail Concert series.

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Historian Walter Johnson To Speak on “The Negro Fever” March 8 at Amherst College

March 5, 2007
Director of Media Relations
413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Walter Johnson ’88, a professor of history at Harvard University, will speak on “‘The Negro Fever,’ the South, and the Ignoble Effort to Re-Open the Atlantic Slave Trade” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 8, in the Alumni House at Amherst College. Sponsored by the Black Studies Department at Amherst College with the help of the History Department, American Studies Department and the Corliss Lamont Lectureship Fund, Johnson’s talk is free and open to the public.

Johnson received a B.A. degree in history from Amherst College in 1988, a postgraduate diploma in history from the University of Cambridge in 1989 and a Ph.D. in American history from Princeton University in 1995. He has also been a member of the Society of Fellows at New York University (NYU), a Goddard Fellow at NYU, a Mellon Fellow in Cultural Studies at Wesleyan University, a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and an ACLS-Burkhardt Fellow.

Johnson is the author of the prize-winning Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market (1999), The Chattel Principle: Internal Slave Trades in the Americas (2005) and the forthcoming River of Dark Dreams: Slavery, Capitalism, and Imperialism in the Mississippi Valley.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu