Philosopher Harry G. Frankfurt to Discuss Inadvertence and Responsibility at Amherst College March 6

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 3, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Harry G. Frankfurt, professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Princeton University, will give a talk titled “Inadvertence and Responsibility” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 6, in Amherst College’s Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall. Organized by the Amherst College Department of Philosophy and funded by the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science, Frankfurt’s talk and a reception afterwards are both free and open to the public.

A professor at Princeton from 1990 to 2002, Frankfurt spent much of his career exploring the ways in which people think about themselves intellectually and morally and how ideals and values shape our lives. He has also delved into the relevance of love and non-moral goals and standards to issues of practical reason and into the distinction between being active and being passive.

Frankfurt is the author of the books Demons, Dreamers and Madmen: The Defense of Reason in Descartes' Meditations (1970), The Importance of What We Care About (1988), Necessity, Volition and Love (1999) and On Bullshit (2005), among others. He has also written more than 50 scholarly articles, essays and reviews.

Prior to his tenure at Princeton, Frankfurt served on the faculty of Yale University, where he chaired the philosophy department from 1978 to 1987 and lectured in the School of Law. He also has taught at Rockefeller University, the State University of New York and The Ohio State University and held several visiting professorships. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science was established in 1983 by Carol Micken and John I. Forry ’66 to promote the study of philosophical issues arising out of new developments in the sciences, including mathematics, and issues in the philosophy and history of science.

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