Love, Art, Scandal and the Hummingbird: Book Signing with Christopher Benfey April 21

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 19, 2008
Contact: Donna M. Abelli
Development and Marketing Manager
The Emily Dickinson Museum

413/542-5084

AMHERST, Mass.—Critic and essayist Christopher Benfey will share the alluring story of his newest book, A Summer of Hummingbirds: Love, Art, and Scandal in the Intersecting Worlds of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade, at the Emily Dickinson Museum on Monday, April 21, at 4 p.m. A book-signing and reception will follow the event, which is free and open to the public.

In A Summer of Hummingbirds, Benfey maps the intricate web of friendship, family and romance that connected Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Martin Johnson Heade. His complex tale of interconnection comes to an apex in Amherst, Mass., during the summer of 1882, a time when loyalties were betrayed and thoughts exchanged with the speed of a hummingbird’s wings. As infidelity and lust run rampant, the incendiary ghost of Lord Byron is evoked, and the characters of A Summer of Hummingbirds find themselves caught in the crossfire between the Calvinist world of decorum, restraint and judgment and a romantic, unconventional world in which nature prevails and freedom is all. Benfey unveils how, through the art of these great thinkers, the hummingbird became the symbol of an era, an image through which they could explore their controversial ideas of nature, religion, sexuality, family, time, exoticism and beauty—all of which would come to shape American thought.

Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College and a prolific critic and essayist who writes for The New York Times Book Review, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books and the online magazine Slate. He has published three books set in the American Gilded Age: The Double Life of Stephen Crane, Degas in New Orleans and The Great Wave: Gilded Age Misfits, Japanese Eccentrics, and the Opening of Old Japan. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies.

The Emily Dickinson Museum, comprising the Dickinson Homestead and The Evergreens, two historic house museums in Amherst, is devoted to the story and legacy of poet Emily Dickinson and her family. Both properties are owned by the trustees of Amherst College. The museum is overseen by a separate board of governors charged with raising its operating and capital funds. The Dickinson Homestead was the birthplace and residence of the poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), while the Evergreens was the 1856 home of the poet’s brother and sister-in-law, Austin and Susan Dickinson.

The Emily Dickinson Museum is located at 280 Main Street in Amherst, Mass. Hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., March through December, with extended hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., June through August.

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Amherst Biology Professor Michael Hood Receives $690,000 NSF CAREER Award

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 18, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College’s Michael Hood, professor of biology, has received a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The five-year, $690,000 prize will enable Hood to continue his research on disease transmission and genomics—studies that may one day better explain how common illnesses function.

“I am extremely pleased and flattered to have been recognized with this award,” said Hood. “Perhaps more importantly, though, I am excited for the research it will enable me to conduct.” Added Gregory S. Call, dean of the faculty at Amherst: “As Michael so aptly demonstrates, members of the college’s faculty are committed to cutting-edge scholarship and, when and wherever possible, to inspiring our students to contribute to it.” 

The funding will support a project of Hood’s exploring the fungus Microbrytrum, which, though harmless in humans, causes a common infectious disease in plants. Hood and his team of Amherst undergraduate students will let the anther smut, as it is called, progress in flowers in his lab and greenhouse and study the disease as it spreads from one plant to another. They will also examine its novel genomic properties and the evolution of its chromosome structure as it runs its course.

By observing the anther smut as it interacts with its host, said Hood, he and his team aim to develop a model for disease that can be applied to biologically similar human illnesses, such as sexually transmitted diseases. “This is a great way to painlessly shed some light some illnesses that cause quite a bit of misery among men and women today,” he explained. “It is also a wonderful opportunity to get Amherst undergraduates excited about careers in research and evolutionary biology.”

The NSF is an independent U.S. government agency responsible for promoting science and engineering through programs that invest over $3.3 billion per year in almost 20,000 research and education projects in science and engineering.

According to its Web site, the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program supports “the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization.” Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of integrated contributions to research and education.

Hood received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Virginia. He earned a doctorate from North Carolina State University and completed post-doctoral work at Duke University and the University of Virginia. He joined the Amherst faculty in 2006.

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Emily Dickinson Museum Open for the 2008 Season

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 18, 2008
Contact: Donna M. Abelli
Development and Marketing Manager
The Emily Dickinson Museum

413/542-5084

AMHERST, Mass—The Emily Dickinson Museum: The Homestead and The Evergreens has opened for its 2008 season with expanded hours and exciting new programming. The museum, which is made up of two homes—the Homestead, where the poet was born and lived for 40 years, and The Evergreens, where Emily Dickinson’s brother Austin lived with his family—is open March through December from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. June through August, the museum is open for special expanded hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Says Jane Wald, the museum’s executive director, “We see growing interest in Emily Dickinson’s extraordinary poetic legacy among both the general public and the arts and culture community. Last year, more than 10,500 visitors participated in museum tours and programs. These visitors have told us that their experiences offered new insights into Dickinson’s genius and the ground from which it sprung right here in Amherst. We want to make those experiences as available as possible.”

2008 brings many exciting developments at the Emily Dickinson Museum. In addition to continuing such popular programs as the museum’s Dickinson-inspired book club, The Kinsmen of the Shelf, a poetry discussion group and a mid-summer children’s circus, the museum will host its annual “Madness in the Spring” recognition of National Poetry Month. The latter will feature a reading and book-signing by renowned poet Galway Kinnell and the celebration of the release of essayist Christopher Benfey’s latest book, A Summer of Hummingbirds: Love, Art, and Scandal in the Intersecting Worlds of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade.

For a complete list of the Emily Dickinson Museum’s 2008 programming and special events, visit www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org. Admission fees range from $3 to $8. Discounts may apply, and there is no charge for children under 6. 

The Emily Dickinson Museum is devoted to the story and legacy of poet Emily Dickinson and her family. Both properties are owned by the trustees of Amherst College. The museum is overseen by a separate board of governors charged with raising its operating and capital funds. It is located at 280 Main Street in Amherst, Mass.

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Research of Amherst College Biology Professor Ethan Temeles Featured in Permanent Smithsonian Exhibit

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 18, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Scientists at the world-renowned Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History have chosen to feature the studies of Amherst College biology professor Ethan Temeles in an exhibition explaining co-adaptation in animals and plants. The exhibit, titled Butterflies + Plants: Partners in Evolution, is a permanent one and will likely remain in its current location for at least 20 years, according to museum administrators.

Based on the study of co-evolution, Partners in Evolution examines how organisms interact with one another and how they change from generation to generation because of those interactions. While an indoor garden of butterflies and plants is the central focus of the exhibition, a variety of organisms—from bats to beetles—and their interactions with plants are also featured.  Temeles’s work linking the evolution of the purple-throated carib hummingbird to the flowering plant it pollinates, two species of Heliconia, is among just a handful of research projects spotlighted.

“Charles Darwin was among the first to suggest that interactions between plants and their pollinators could result in reciprocal adaptation,” said Temeles. “To be able to study such reciprocal adaptation between plants and hummingbirds across a Caribbean archipelago and then to be featured in this exhibit are amazing experiences for me. I feel so fortunate as a scientist.”

Temeles received a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Cornell University and went on to earn a master’s in zoology from Louisiana State University. He completed his doctoral work at the University of California Davis and joined the Amherst faculty in 1994.

According to the organization’s Web site, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., is the most visited natural history museum in the world. Opened in 1910, the museum is dedicated to maintaining and preserving the world’s most extensive collection of natural history specimens and human artifacts. It also fosters critical scientific research as well as educational programs and exhibitions that present the work of its scientists and curators to the public.

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Poetry Scholar to Lecture on “Emily Dickinson and the Brownings: A Triad of Poets” March 25

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 18, 2008
Contact: Donna M. Abelli
Development and Marketing Manager
The Emily Dickinson Museum

413/542-5084

AMHERST, Mass.—The Emily Dickinson Museum’s “Replenishing the Shelves” lecture series continues with guest speaker Vincent Petronella on March 25 at 7 p.m. Petronella will deliver a talk titled “Emily Dickinson and the Brownings: A Triad of Poets” at the Amherst’s Woman’s Club on Triangle Street. There is no charge for this program, but donations are appreciated.

Dickinson’s admiration of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s work is well documented. Elizabeth Barrett’s poetry is considered by most scholars to be a significant inspiration for Dickinson who admired her not only as a great poet but also as a woman of achievement. Dickinson paid little attention to Robert Browning while Barrett was alive, but after Barrett’s passing from a long illness in 1861, Dickinson found a temporal sensibility in Browning’s poetry. Petronella will discuss the extraordinary lives of Dickinson, Barrett and Browning, who are considered by many to be three of the world’s greatest poets.

Petronella earned his doctorate in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and currently serves as professor emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a seminar leader and board member for Beacon Hill Seminars in Boston, where he teaches courses in Shakespeare, the poetry of the Brownings and John Keats, the fiction of Hawthorne and Melville and the plays of George Bernard Shaw. He is a past president of the Boston Browning Society.

“Replenishing the Shelves” is a Dickinson Museum initiative aimed at recreating the libraries of the Homestead and The Evergreens as accurately as possible. The effort is dedicated to and led by Polly Longsworth, a longtime Dickinson scholar and the first chair of the Emily Dickinson museum’s board of governors. “Restocking the Dickinson family library dovetails with the museum’s mission of preserving the legacy of the Dickinson family,” said Longsworth. “Few possessions meant so much to them. Even though it would be a lifetime challenge to read all the books Emily Dickinson read, we welcome the support of friends in the great project of reassembling on the shelves those she lived with.” For more information on “Replenishing the Shelves,” please visit the Dickinson Museum’s Web site, emilydickinsonmuseum.org, or call executive director Jane Wald (413/542-2154).

The Emily Dickinson Museum, comprising the Dickinson Homestead and The Evergreens, is devoted to the story and legacy of poet Emily Dickinson and her family. Both properties are owned by the trustees of Amherst College. The museum is overseen by a separate board of governors charged with raising its operating and capital funds. The Dickinson Homestead was the birthplace and residence of the poet (1830-1886), while The Evergreens was the 1856 home of the poet’s brother and sister-in-law, Austin and Susan Dickinson.

The museum is located at 280 Main Street in Amherst. Hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., March through December, with extended hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., June through August.

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Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum Presents New Exhibition of Russian Art

Submitted by Holly R. Saltrelli

March 13, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum will present Celebrating a Transforming Legacy: Russian Art from the Collection of Thomas P. Whitney, Class of 1937, a special installation of 11 highlights from the collection organized in memory of its namesake, an extraordinary benefactor to Amherst College. Opening March 13, the presentation will remain on view through January 4, 2009.

The Thomas P. Whitney ’37 Collection of Russian Art includes more than 400 works of art dating primarily to the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries and represents many artistic media: oil paintings, collages, stage and costume designs, children’s book illustrations, sculptures and artists’ books. Mead director and chief curator Elizabeth Barker explained: “Taken as a whole, Mr. Whitney’s diverse collection provides rich insight into the history of Russian art. Additionally, given the international character of the artistic movements that it encompasses (Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism and Suprematism), these Russian artworks also shed fresh light on European and American art of the same periods.”

Highlights of the collection include paintings by avant-garde artists Natalia Goncharova, Mikhail Larionov, Alexander Rodchenko, Liubov Popova and Alexandra Exter and the only painting by Pavel Filonov (The Flight into Egypt, 1918) in a North American collection. Among its more than 250 works on paper are complete print series by Goncharova and Olga Rozanova and works by Alexander Archipenko, Leon Bakst, Marc Chagall, Vladmir Tatlin, El Lissitzky, Ivan Puni and Naum Gabo, who is also represented by a major Constructivist sculpture (Vertical Construction No. 2, The Waterfall, 1965-66.) Broadening the historical context for the modern works at the collection’s core are a group of Russian icons dating from the 17th through the 20th centuries, as well as paintings by traditional artists Isaak Levitan, Valentin Serov and Konstantin Somov and by later 20th-century artists Alexei Remizov, Oleg Kudryashov and Ernst Neizvestny.

Visitors can learn more about the collection by visiting the museum’s online catalogue, accessible from the home page of the Web site (www.amherst.edu/mead), and by consulting The World Opened Wide: 20th-Century Russian Women Artists from the Collection of Thomas P. Whitney ’37, edited by Jill Meredith and Darra Goldstein, with contributions by Stanley Rabinowitz and Sonya Bekkerman, published by the Mead Art Museum in 2001. Information about the Amherst Center for Russian Culture, where additional works of Russian art from Whitney’s collection are displayed in close proximity to the related collection of books and manuscripts, is available on the Web site (www.amherst.edu/~acrc/) or by calling 413/542-8204.

Whitney was a writer, translator and journalist who laid the groundwork for the study of Russian culture at his alma mater through his generous gifts, including the foundation of the Amherst Center for Russian Culture in 1991 and the donation of a major collection of Russian art to the Mead Art Museum in 2000. After graduating from Amherst in 1937 and receiving an M. A. from Columbia University in 1940, Whitney moved to Moscow. During the 1940s and 1950s, while working first as an U.S. embassy official and later as an Associated Press correspondent, he began to acquire an extraordinary collection of Russian art and archival materials. Following his return to the United States, Whitney continued his lifelong engagement with Slavic culture, writing books such as Russia In My Life (1962) and translating modern Russian literary works by Alexander Solzhenitsyn and others.

The Mead Art Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursdays until 9 p.m. For more information, please visit the museum’s Web site, www.amherst.edu/mead, or call 413/542-2335.

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Amherst College to Host Symposium on Jewish Writings April 4 and 5; Gathering Honors Scholar Who Edited the Dead Sea Scrolls

Submitted by Emanuel Costache

March 13, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—On April 4 and 5, Amherst College will honor the life and career of John J. Collins, Yale Divinity School’s Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation and one of America’s preeminent biblical scholars, with a symposium titled “The Other in Second Temple Judaism.” Featuring longtime colleagues and students of the gathering’s namesake in addition to the man himself, the conference will explore many of the issues and areas within biblical and Hellenistic Jewish writings on which Collins has shed light during his long and distinguished career.

The symposium, which is open to the public at no charge, will take place in Cole Assembly Room of the Amherst’s Converse Hall. A few of the talks on the agenda include:

  • “God’s Other: The Intractable Problem of the Gentile King in Israelite and Early Jewish Literature” by Carol Newsom, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament at Emory University
  • “Israel and the ‘Other’ in Late Biblical and Early Rabbinic Thought” by Joel Kaminsky, associate professor of religion at Smith College
  • “Idolatry and Otherness: Israel and the Nations in the Apocalypse of Abraham” by Daniel Harlow, associate professor of religion at Calvin College

Also speaking will be the Samuel Green Professor of Religion at Amherst, Susan Niditch, who will deliver concluding remarks with colleagues Susan Ackermann, the Preston H. Kelsey Professor of Religion at Dartmouth College, and Adela Yarbro Collins, the Buckingham Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale Divinity School.

A native of Ireland, Collins was a professor of Hebrew Bible at the University of Chicago from 1991 until his arrival at Yale Divinity School in 2000. He previously taught at the University of Notre Dame. He has published widely on the subjects of apocalypticism, wisdom, Hellenistic Judaism and the Dead Sea Scrolls. His books include The Scepter and the Star: The Messiahs of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Other Ancient Literature, Jewish Wisdom in the Hellenistic Age, The Apocalyptic Imagination and Between Athens and Jerusalem: Jewish Identity in the Hellenistic Diaspora. He is also co-editor of the three-volume Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism and has participated in the editing of the Dead Sea Scrolls. He has served as editor of the Journal of Biblical Literature and as president of both the Catholic Biblical Association and the Society of Biblical Literature.

Additional information about the conference is available at http://www.cswebtech.com/collins/conference.html.

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Author Stephanie Grant to Hold Reading at Amherst Books March 27

Submitted by Emanuel Costache

March 7, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Author Stephanie Grant will read from her work at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 27, at Amherst Books (8 Main Street, Amherst, Mass.). Sponsored by the Amherst College Creative Writing Center, the event is open to the public at no charge.

Grant’s first novel, The Passion of Alice, was nominated for Britain’s Orange Prize for Women Writers and the Lambda Award for Best Lesbian Fiction. Her new novel, Map of Ireland, is a contemporary retelling of Huckleberry Finn that Publisher’s Weekly described as “funny and startlingly frank”: “Grant expertly captures the confusion, angst, and insightfulness of a teenager dealing with race and sexual relations in a turbulent era.” Formerly writer-in-residence at Mount Holyoke College, Grant is currently visiting writer at the Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University.  

Every year, the Amherst College Creative Writing Center sponsors a reading series featuring both emerging and established authors. All events are wheelchair-accessible and followed by refreshments. For more information, please call 413/542-8200.

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Former Amherst College Student Noah Isserman ’07 Receives Prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Submitted by Emanuel Costache

March 6, 2008
Contact: Emanuel Costache '09
Media Relations Intern
413/542-2321
Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Noah Isserman of Urbana, Ill., Amherst College Class of 2007, has been named a 2008 Gates Cambridge Scholar. Isserman numbers among just 45 students in the country and 100 students worldwide to receive the prestigious award, which will subsidize all of his expenses for a year of study toward a master’s degree in philosophy at the University of Cambridge in England.

At Amherst, Isserman designed his own interdisciplinary course of study in cognitive neuroscience. He described his study of cognitive neuroscience as “focused on the neural and hormonal correlates of human decision-making when emotion or fairness are in conflict with economic optimality.” He will present the findings from his undergraduate thesis at the annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society in San Francisco this April.

At Cambridge, Isserman plans to focus on geographical research, which will allow him “to study the massive and ongoing influx of money into socially or environmentally responsible investment vehicles.” Connecting his thesis work to his current interests, Isserman said: “While research into socially and environmentally responsible investment is in some ways an extension of that theme, the closest parallel is probably on a field level—both cognitive neuroscience and economic geography are extremely interdisciplinary in nature, and I find myself most excited in such necessarily collaborative and dynamic environments.” He will study at Gonville and Caius College with university lecturer Mia Gray. He also hopes to take a seminar with Lucasian Chair of Mathematics Stephen Hawking, who is a fellow at Caius.

“Noah is notable for his quick wit, his entrepreneurial spirit and the depth of his engagement with questions of social justice,” said Barry O’Connell, James E. Ostendarp Professor of English. “He can be wonderfully irreverent as well as insistent that at least this teacher engage his toughest questions. He will accomplish great things.” Isserman worked as a course co-leader for O’Connell’s seminar “Democracy and Education.”

While at Amherst, Isserman served as chairman and CEO of MAStorage, a student-run storage solution firm, which is unique among summer storage businesses in that it offers financial aid to college students for whom the cost of storage would otherwise be a significant burden. Isserman was also a co-founder and lead consultant of Occam Partners, a consulting firm for small businesses.

A graduate of the University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Ill., Isserman is the son of Andrew Isserman, Amherst Class of 1968, and Ellen Jacobsen-Isserman. At Amherst, he served as student body vice president as well as a class senator. In addition to playing on the varsity men’s soccer team, Isserman was elected to represent all Amherst’s varsity athletes to the NESCAC Student-Athlete Committee and was subsequently elected chair of the 11 college conference (e.g. Middlebury, Bowdoin, Williams). As chair, Isserman spearheaded an effort encourage student-athletes to support and take part in Habitat for Humanity builds.

 Isserman has been honored with several Amherst awards that have funded his efforts in social entrepreneurship, including a Roger E. Alcaly Public Service Fellowship to support an eight-student group that aided in Sri Lankan tsunami relief, a Tom Gerety Fellowship for Action and various research awards from the Dean of the Faculty to support research in cognitive neuroscience. He is the first Amherst College student to receive a Gates Scholarship.   

The Gates Cambridge Scholarship Program was created in 2000 when the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced a donation of $210 million to the University of Cambridge to establish the Gates Cambridge trust. In the first seven years of the program, 726 students from more than 75 countries have taken up their scholarships at Cambridge, including more than 300 graduates of more than 100 U.S. colleges and universities. The 256 Gates Scholars at Cambridge for 2007-08 come from 60 different countries.

Founded in 1821, Amherst is a highly selective, coeducational liberal arts college with approximately 1,600 students from most of the 50 states and more than 30 other countries. Considered one of the nation’s best educational institutions, Amherst awards the B. A. degree in 34 fields of study.

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Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum Presents “The Chuck Close Assembly Line” March 9

Submitted by Holly R. Saltrelli

March 6, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Sunday, March 9, from noon to 1 p.m., the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College will host a gallery talk titled “The Chuck Close Assembly Line,” in conjunction with the current exhibit on display, Chuck Close: Self-Portrait/Scribble/Etching Portfolio, 2000. The talk, which describes the behind-the-scenes work of three young artists who produced 22 woodblocks for one of Close’s self-portrait prints, is free and open to the public.

In the summer of 2006, Ali Osborn, Raphy Griswold and Teddy O’Connor were hired to carve 22 large-scale woodblocks for a Japanese ukiyo-e print by Chuck Close. Such work is not usual: throughout art history, from Raphael’s tapestries to Jeff Koons’s floral “Puppy,” large-scale artwork has often been produced entirely by teams of artisans with the credited artist never having “made” any part of the finished work. The Close project took the entire summer, with the three assistants working tirelessly to deliver the blocks on time for an artist whom they would never actually meet.

Besides discussing their own experiences working on a print by a master artist, Osborn, Griswold and O’Connor hope to shed further light on the often-confusing processes of printmaking. The three will discuss Japanese ukiyo-e printmaking, how it differs from traditional woodblock printmaking, the particular types of tools and specific carving techniques used and the sometimes-overwhelming tedium of working on such large blocks of wood—not to mention the bottles of iodine and boxes of bandages they went through.

 “The chance to share these young artists’ fascinating—and often hilarious—stories about their experiences carving a woodblock for Chuck Close seems a perfect complement to the exhibition, which explores Close’s extraordinary techniques of printmaking in some depth,” said director of the Mead Art Museum Elizabeth Barker.

The Mead Art Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday evening until 9 p.m. For more information, visit the museum’s Web site, www.amherst.edu/mead, or call 413/542-2335.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu