Award-Winning Florestan Trio to Perform the Fifth Concert of the 2007-08 Music at Amherst Series on Thursday, March 13

Submitted by Holly R. Saltrelli

March 6, 2008
Contact: Sara Leonard
Concert and Production Manager

413/542-2195

AMHERST, Mass.—The Music at Amherst Concert Series presents the Florestan Trio Thursday, March 13, at 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center at Amherst College. A limited number of tickets are available for purchase through the Amherst College Concert Office.

Winners of the 2000 Royal Philharmonic Society Award, the 12-year-old Florestan Trio is internationally recognized for their achievements in performance and devotion to their field of music, which they believe deserves wholehearted commitment. In celebration of their 10th anniversary season, the Trio completed a recording of the Beethoven cycle of trios for Hyperion Records. In this concert, the Florestan Trio will play Juon’s Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 17, and Haydn’s Piano Trio in D Major, Hob. XV:24, and will close with Brahms’s Piano Trio in B Major, Op. 8.

The Music at Amherst Series has one remaining concert this season. On Saturday, April 12, tenor Joseph Kaiser will close the 2007-08 season with a solo recital.

Tickets for the Florestan Trio are available to the general public for $25. Tickets for senior citizens and Amherst College employees are $20, student tickets are $10 and Amherst College student tickets are $6. Tickets for all concerts go on sale two weeks prior to the date of the performance and may be purchased in advance by calling the Concert Office at 413/542-2195.

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Amherst College Professor Leah D. Hewitt Publishes New Book on Cultural Representations of Occupied France

Submitted by Emanuel Costache

March 6, 2008
Contact: Emanuel Costache '09
Media Relations Intern
413/542-2321
Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Leah D. Hewitt, professor of French at Amherst College, has just published Remembering the Occupation in French Film: National Identity in Postwar Europe ($75, Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), as part of the Study in European Culture and History series.

In the new book, Hewitt explores French identity as it is articulated through cultural representations of occupied France in French film. She outlines and demonstrates how French film has allowed for a public airing of current concerns through the lens of memory’s recreations of the Occupation. By focusing on the representation of women as the symbol of a collective identity crisis, Hewitt links France’s traditional female icon, “Marianne,” to the multiple unresolved ambiguities that have continued to plague France’s historical reckoning with the war. “The ties between Marianne’s official symbolism and her artistic versions in French films about the Occupation,” said Hewitt, “tell the complex story of a collective identity crisis.”

Hewitt is also the author of the book Autobiographical Tightropes: Simone de Beauvoir, Nathalie Sarraute, Marguerite Duras, Monique Wittig, and Maryse Conde. At Amherst since 1984, she regularly teaches courses on modern and contemporary French culture and literature, including the works of Proust, Sartre, Camus, Duras and Modiano.

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Late Palm Beach Alumnus Leaves Amherst College $23 Million; Bequest Is Single Largest in School’s History

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 3, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.— Dwight Goldthorpe, an Amherst College alumnus who died last year, has left his alma mater $23 million for the school’s campus. Representing two-thirds of the donor’s residuary estate, the bequest is the single largest in Amherst’s history. 

Goldthorpe, the 1941 Amherst graduate who made the bequest, was a private investor for many years. According to his wishes, his gift will be used to enhance Amherst’s physical plant, either for the addition of a new facility or for the expansion of an existing building.

“We are incredibly grateful for Mr. Goldthorpe’s generosity,” said Amherst College President Anthony W. Marx. “His support will enable us to further improve our campus and, in turn, help us recruit the most promising students, faculty and staff. The gift is a wonderful legacy, and will be forever beneficial for future generations of Amherst undergraduates.”

Goldthorpe graduated from Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, Pa., and enrolled at Amherst in the late 1930s. During his college career, he played squash, managed the varsity swim team and was a member of Theta Xi fraternity. He went on to spend one year at Harvard Business School, and then entered the Navy during World War II. Upon his discharge from the military, he took a job on Wall Street, but shortly thereafter became a private investor. He retired to Palm Beach, Fla., in the early 1950s, becoming a tennis champion at many of the local social clubs over the next several decades. He left no living family members.

Goldthorpe participated in few formal Amherst class gatherings since he graduated, but he did regularly attend football games at his alma mater’s Pratt Field, following the team with a passion. His bequest follows a long line of alumni and friends who have made Amherst college facilities possible; two such benefactors include Adam Johnson for whom Johnson Chapel was named in 1823, and Daniel B. Fayerweather, for whom Fayerweather Hall was named in 1893.

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Philosopher Harry G. Frankfurt to Discuss Inadvertence and Responsibility at Amherst College March 6

Submitted by Patricia M. Allen

March 3, 2008
Contact: Caroline Jenkins Hanna
Director of Media Relations

413/542-8417

AMHERST, Mass.—Harry G. Frankfurt, professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Princeton University, will give a talk titled “Inadvertence and Responsibility” at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 6, in Amherst College’s Cole Assembly Room in Converse Hall. Organized by the Amherst College Department of Philosophy and funded by the Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science, Frankfurt’s talk and a reception afterwards are both free and open to the public.

A professor at Princeton from 1990 to 2002, Frankfurt spent much of his career exploring the ways in which people think about themselves intellectually and morally and how ideals and values shape our lives. He has also delved into the relevance of love and non-moral goals and standards to issues of practical reason and into the distinction between being active and being passive.

Frankfurt is the author of the books Demons, Dreamers and Madmen: The Defense of Reason in Descartes' Meditations (1970), The Importance of What We Care About (1988), Necessity, Volition and Love (1999) and On Bullshit (2005), among others. He has also written more than 50 scholarly articles, essays and reviews.

Prior to his tenure at Princeton, Frankfurt served on the faculty of Yale University, where he chaired the philosophy department from 1978 to 1987 and lectured in the School of Law. He also has taught at Rockefeller University, the State University of New York and The Ohio State University and held several visiting professorships. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Forry and Micken Fund in Philosophy and Science was established in 1983 by Carol Micken and John I. Forry ’66 to promote the study of philosophical issues arising out of new developments in the sciences, including mathematics, and issues in the philosophy and history of science.

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Contact

Peter Rooney
Director of Public Affairs
(413) 542-2321
prooney@amherst.edu