Amherst College 2016-17 Catalog

  • Introduction
  • About Amherst College
  • Admission & Financial Aid
  • Regulations & Requirements
  • Amherst College Courses
  • Five College Programs & Certificates
  • Honors & Fellowships

Introduction

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

About Amherst College

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

Admission & Financial Aid

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

Regulations & Requirements

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

Amherst College Courses

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

Five College Programs & Certificates

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.

 

 

 

 

Honors & Fellowships

View Index

Fellowships

COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

FROM the income of the College’s fellowship funds, approximately 160 awards are made annually to graduates of Amherst College for study in graduate or professional schools. Applications should be made by February 10 on forms available in December on the Office of Fellowships’ website. This same dead­line applies to seniors and to graduates. You need not have been accepted at graduate school to apply, but the awards are made contingent upon final en­rollment. The awards are based on merit and need (except for the Kellogg and Rosenblum) and are determined by the Faculty Committee on Student Fel­lowships. An exception to this is the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship for which the deadline is early in November and for which there is a special Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship. Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, is open to graduating seniors and recent alumni of the College for a term of one or, in some cases, two years. The recipient will have the opportunity to work with a professor and representative of the College at Doshisha, and to teach English to Japa­nese students. No knowledge of the Japanese language is required, but many recent fellows have spoken Japanese to a greater or lesser extent.

The fellowship offers a stipend and an allowance for travel and incidental expenses, shared equally between Amherst and Doshisha. The fellowship year is normally from September to August. It carries with it some teaching re­sponsibilities in the English language at Doshisha University, at the first-year and second-year level. The academic year at Doshisha allows fellows to travel in Asia during February and March.

Interested applicants should contact the Office of Fellowships for more in­formation. This fellowship is awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the rec­ommendation of the Amherst-Doshisha Fellowship Committee.

The Amherst Memorial Fellowships. These fellowships, in memory of Am­herst graduates who gave their lives for an ideal, are given primarily for the study of social, economic, and political institutions, and for preparation for teaching and the ministry. The fund was established because of the “need for better understanding and more complete adjustment” between humans and their “existing social, economic, and political institutions for the study of the principles underlying these human relationships.”

The object of the fellowships is to permit students of character, scholarly promise, and intellectual curiosity to investigate some problem in the human­istic sciences. During previous training candidates should have given evidence of marked mental ability in some branch of the social sciences—history, eco­nomics, political science—and have given promise of original contribution to a particular field of study. It is desirable that they possess qualities of leadership, a spirit of service, and an intention to devote their efforts to the betterment of social conditions through teaching in its broad sense, journalism, politics, or field work.

Preference is given to candidates planning to do advanced work in the field of the social sciences, but awards may also be made to candidates who are plan­ning to go to theological school in preparation for a career in the ministry and to those from other fields than the social sciences who are preparing for a career in teaching in secondary schools or colleges.

The fellowships are for one year but, upon reapplication, may be approved for one or two additional years, depending upon the nature of the subjects in­vestigated or upon other circumstances which, in the judgment of the commit­tee, warrant a variation in the length of tenure.

The stipend will vary according to the circumstances of the appointment. Awards will depend upon those aspects of individual cases which, in the judg­ment of the committee, most suitably fulfill the purpose of the foundation.

These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Mason Clarke 1877 Fellowship in Paleontology and Geology. A fund from the estate of Noah T. Clarke was established in memory of his father, John Mason Clarke 1877, to provide income for a fellowship or fellowships for the pursuit of studies in paleontology or geology, preferably in the New York State Museum in Albany, New York.

The Evan Carroll Commager Fellowship. This fund, established by Professor Henry Steele Commager in memory of his late wife and “as a testimony to her affection for this College,” enables an Amherst student to study at Cambridge University. The fellowship is for one year but, upon reapplication, may be ap­proved for a second year. The award is open to any student, with preference to seniors and to those applying to Peterhouse, St. John’s, Trinity, or Downing College.

The Henry P. Field Fellowships. Two fellowships are available from the in­come of the bequest of the late Henry P. Field 1880 to promote graduate study in the fields of English and history. Appointments are made annually by the Col­lege on the recommendation of the departments of English and history.

The Warner Gardner Fletcher Fellowship. The income from a gift from the late Warner Gardner Fletcher ’41 is awarded to “pursue work for the improve­ment of education.” Preference is given to candidates who are engaged in the study of education and then to candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching.

Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship. Established in 1997 by Seth E. Frank ’55, the in­come from this fund is to be used annually for post-graduate work by a gradu­ate of Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded to a graduate who has demonstrated exceptional ability, interest, and achievement in the area of International Relations. The fellowship is not limited to graduate study but may be awarded for other endeavors which are international in scope.

The Roswell Dwight Hitchcock Memorial Fellowship. A fund, established by the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, provides an annual award to a member or mem­bers of the senior class for excellence in history and the social and economic sciences. The holder of the fellowship pursues for one year a course of study in history or economics, to be completed within the period of two years next fol­lowing graduation.

The Rufus B. Kellogg University Fellowship. The income from the fund, es­tablished by the late Rufus B. Kellogg 1858, provides certain prizes, and a fel­lowship award for three years to a graduate of Amherst College, who shall be appointed upon the following conditions: The Fellow is elected by the Faculty on the recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships. Consideration is given to seniors or members of the classes graduated in the preceding six years. The fellowship is awarded to that graduate who, in the judgment of the Faculty, is best equipped for study and research, without re­gard to any other considerations, except that the Fellow should have an espe­cially good knowledge of at least one modern foreign language and should have had at least one year of Latin in preparatory school or college. The three years shall be spent by the Fellow at a German university or other approved institution, for the study of philosophy, philology, literature, history, political science, political economy, mathematics or natural science. At least one college term of the final year shall be spent by the Fellow at Amherst College, to give lectures on a subject selected by the Fellow and approved by the Trustees. The lectures shall be published in book form or in a learned journal. This fellow­ship is based solely on merit. The Kellogg Fellowship is awarded for three years and will be awarded again in 2018.

The Sterling P. Lamprecht Fellowship. From the income of this fund, fellow­ships are awarded to recent graduates of Amherst College for the pursuit of philosophy. Upon reapplication, these fellowships may be approved for a maxi­mum of three years. They need not be awarded at all in one particular year, and it might be, if there were no suitable graduates, awarded to an undergraduate, in which case it would be known as the Sterling P. Lamprecht Scholarship. Pref­erence, however, would be given for graduate study.

The Edward Poole Lay Fellowship. The income from a fund, established by Frank M. Lay 1893 and Mrs. Lay, in memory of their son Edward Poole Lay ’22, provides fellowships to graduates who have shown unusual proficiency and talent in music and who desire to continue studies in the field. Preference is given to candidates who are proficient in voice. In the event that there are no qualified candidates in the musical arts (especially voice and instrumental music), they may be awarded to qualified candidates in the field of the dramatic arts. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Forris Jewett Moore Fellowships. These fellowships, in three fields of study, were established in memory of Forris Jewett Moore 1889 by his widow, Emma B. Moore.

(1) A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of chemistry while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject. Prefer­ence is given to eligible candidates for the field of organic chemistry.

(2)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of history while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

(3)   A fellowship to graduates distinguished in the study of philosophy while undergraduates, who desire to engage in further study of that subject.

The George Stebbins Moses Memorial Fellowship. This memorial fellow­ship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around person qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader and a lover of ordinary people, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improvement in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration. The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellow­ship may be awarded in any given year.

The George A. Plimpton Fellowships. These fellowships, established by the Board of Trustees in memory of George A. Plimpton 1876, a member of the Board from 1890 to 1895 and from 1900 to 1936, and President of the Board from 1907 to 1936, are awarded without stipend to seniors who are of outstanding scholastic ability and promise, who plan to continue their studies in graduate school, and who are not in need of financial assistance. These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Commit­tee on Student Fellowships.

The C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship for Graduate Study. Established in 1972 by the family of C. Scott Porter ’19, mathematics professor, 1924-31, and Dean of the College from 1931-1966, the C. Scott Porter Memorial Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate for further study without restriction as to department or field.

The Lloyd I. Rosenblum Memorial Fellowship. Established in 1997 for his son, Peter M. Rosenblum ’70, and other family members, the fellowship is to be awarded annually to a graduate of Amherst College embarking on his or her first year of graduate studies in the fields of botany and biology. Each benefi­ciary should be a person who demonstrated significant promise in the relevant fields of study as an undergraduate at Amherst College. The fellowship is to be awarded solely on the basis of merit and without regard to race, sex, religion, gender, or nationality.

The Charles B. Rugg Fellowship. Established in memory of Charles Belcher Rugg 1911, this fellowship is awarded to a graduate for the study of law. The award may be renewed for a second or third year upon recommendation of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The John Woodruff Simpson Fellowships and Lectureships. A fund was es­tablished in memory of John Woodruff Simpson 1871 by his wife and daughter. Income from the fund provides: (1) A fellowship for the study of law; (2) A fellowship for the study of medicine; (3) A fellowship for the study of theol­ogy, without regard to creed or religious belief; (4) A fellowship for study at any school, college or university in preparation for the teaching profession; (5) A fellowship for use in graduate study at the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge in England or at the Sorbonne in Paris.

The fund may also be used to secure from time to time from England, France or elsewhere, scholars for the purpose of delivering lectures or courses of instruction at Amherst College.  These fellowships are awarded by the Board of Trustees upon the recom­mendations of the Committee on Student Fellowships.

The Benjamin Goodall Symon, Jr., Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship is awarded to a graduate who has been accepted by a recognized divinity school, who has good reason to seek financial aid, who seems to be an all-around in­dividual qualified in all respects as a religious and moral leader, and who is qualified scholastically to meet the calling of a theological career creditably, although the student may plan to use the divinity school training for work in another field. The candidate need not be an outstanding student, but improve­ment in the upper-class years, dedication, and a sense of purpose will be given great consideration.

The fellowship may be renewed for a second or third year at the discretion of the Committee. More than one fellowship may be awarded in any given year.

The Roland Wood Fellowship. This is awarded annually on recommendation of the Department of Theater and Dance as a fellowship to one or more promising and deserving graduates of Amherst College for continued study in or of the theater.

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS

French Department Fellowship. The French Department offers two exchange fellowships. The appointments will be made by the Department after an an­nouncement at the beginning of March and interviews. Amherst seniors with a high proficiency in French may apply.

The University of Dijon Assistantship. This fellowship is an appointment as teaching assistant in American Civilization and Language for one year at the University of Dijon. The fellowship offers a stipend paid by the French government and free admission to courses at the University.

Exchange Fellowship, Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. This fellowship is without stipend but offers a room at the Ecole Normale Supérieure and admission to any university course in Paris.

The Edward Hitchcock Fellowship. This fellowship, established by the late Mrs. Frank L. Babbott of Brooklyn, N.Y., is available for study in the department of physical education. Its object is to make the student familiar with the best methods of physical training, both in the gymnasium and on the field. The ap­pointment is made by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics.