Amherst College 2017-18 Catalog

  • Introduction
  • About Amherst College
  • Admission & Financial Aid
  • Regulations & Requirements
  • Amherst College Courses
  • Five College Programs & Certificates
  • Honors & Fellowships

Introduction

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FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinitubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the world: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

SUK MASSEY, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 Korean 101. Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian Studies 262 F. Second-Year Korean I. This is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to reinforce and increase students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through activities such as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits, and Korean film making.         

Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 102. Korean I. Beginning Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who have some previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include vocabulary-building exercises, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension and pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

KYAE-SUNG PARK, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 

Asian Studies 160. First-Year Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It provides students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.  Students will also gain basic literacy skills in Korean using the Korean writing system, Hangul.

Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian Studies 161. First-Year Korean II. Beginning Korean II is the second semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in Beginning 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context. 

Requisite: Asian Studies 160 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 301. Korean III.  Advanced Korean I is the first semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  Students will learn to participate in formal and informal conversations on various topics related to school, home, daily activities, employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.  They will also explore cultural, social, historical, and political issues in Korean using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Korean 302. Korean III. Advanced Korean II is the second semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills and cultural practices learned in Advanced 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture as well as familiarity with interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication in Korean.  Students will continue to learn to communicate information on personal topics as well as matters of public and community interest.  They will also continue to explore topics in Korean culture, society, history, and politics, using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and further improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Requisite: Korean 301 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students.Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students. (E)WI {H} Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

About Amherst College

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FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinitubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the world: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

SUK MASSEY, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 Korean 101. Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian Studies 262 F. Second-Year Korean I. This is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to reinforce and increase students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through activities such as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits, and Korean film making.         

Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 102. Korean I. Beginning Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who have some previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include vocabulary-building exercises, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension and pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

KYAE-SUNG PARK, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 

Asian Studies 160. First-Year Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It provides students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.  Students will also gain basic literacy skills in Korean using the Korean writing system, Hangul.

Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian Studies 161. First-Year Korean II. Beginning Korean II is the second semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in Beginning 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context. 

Requisite: Asian Studies 160 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 301. Korean III.  Advanced Korean I is the first semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  Students will learn to participate in formal and informal conversations on various topics related to school, home, daily activities, employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.  They will also explore cultural, social, historical, and political issues in Korean using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Korean 302. Korean III. Advanced Korean II is the second semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills and cultural practices learned in Advanced 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture as well as familiarity with interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication in Korean.  Students will continue to learn to communicate information on personal topics as well as matters of public and community interest.  They will also continue to explore topics in Korean culture, society, history, and politics, using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and further improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Requisite: Korean 301 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students.Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students. (E)WI {H} Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

Admission & Financial Aid

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FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinitubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the world: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

SUK MASSEY, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 Korean 101. Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian Studies 262 F. Second-Year Korean I. This is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to reinforce and increase students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through activities such as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits, and Korean film making.         

Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 102. Korean I. Beginning Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who have some previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include vocabulary-building exercises, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension and pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

KYAE-SUNG PARK, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 

Asian Studies 160. First-Year Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It provides students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.  Students will also gain basic literacy skills in Korean using the Korean writing system, Hangul.

Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian Studies 161. First-Year Korean II. Beginning Korean II is the second semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in Beginning 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context. 

Requisite: Asian Studies 160 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 301. Korean III.  Advanced Korean I is the first semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  Students will learn to participate in formal and informal conversations on various topics related to school, home, daily activities, employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.  They will also explore cultural, social, historical, and political issues in Korean using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Korean 302. Korean III. Advanced Korean II is the second semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills and cultural practices learned in Advanced 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture as well as familiarity with interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication in Korean.  Students will continue to learn to communicate information on personal topics as well as matters of public and community interest.  They will also continue to explore topics in Korean culture, society, history, and politics, using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and further improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Requisite: Korean 301 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students.Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students. (E)WI {H} Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

Regulations & Requirements

View Index

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinitubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the world: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

SUK MASSEY, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 Korean 101. Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian Studies 262 F. Second-Year Korean I. This is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to reinforce and increase students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through activities such as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits, and Korean film making.         

Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 102. Korean I. Beginning Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who have some previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include vocabulary-building exercises, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension and pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

KYAE-SUNG PARK, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 

Asian Studies 160. First-Year Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It provides students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.  Students will also gain basic literacy skills in Korean using the Korean writing system, Hangul.

Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian Studies 161. First-Year Korean II. Beginning Korean II is the second semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in Beginning 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context. 

Requisite: Asian Studies 160 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 301. Korean III.  Advanced Korean I is the first semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  Students will learn to participate in formal and informal conversations on various topics related to school, home, daily activities, employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.  They will also explore cultural, social, historical, and political issues in Korean using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Korean 302. Korean III. Advanced Korean II is the second semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills and cultural practices learned in Advanced 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture as well as familiarity with interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication in Korean.  Students will continue to learn to communicate information on personal topics as well as matters of public and community interest.  They will also continue to explore topics in Korean culture, society, history, and politics, using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and further improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Requisite: Korean 301 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students.Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students. (E)WI {H} Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

Amherst College Courses

View Index

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinitubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the world: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

SUK MASSEY, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 Korean 101. Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who do not have any previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include oral dialogue journals (ODJ), expanding knowledge of vocabulary, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension, pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian Studies 262 F. Second-Year Korean I. This is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to reinforce and increase students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through activities such as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits, and Korean film making.         

Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 102. Korean I. Beginning Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course in spoken and written Korean for students who have some previous knowledge of Korean. This course is designed to improve students’ communicative competence in daily life, focusing on the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some of the activities include vocabulary-building exercises, conversation in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, listening comprehension and pronunciation practice, mini-presentations, Korean film reviews and Korean film making.

            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

KYAE-SUNG PARK, Five College Lecturer in Korean.

 

Asian Studies 160. First-Year Korean I. Beginning Korean I is the first semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It provides students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.  Students will also gain basic literacy skills in Korean using the Korean writing system, Hangul.

Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian Studies 161. First-Year Korean II. Beginning Korean II is the second semester of First-Year Korean (Beginning 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in Beginning 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.  The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context. 

Requisite: Asian Studies 160 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean 301. Korean III.  Advanced Korean I is the first semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 1), which consists of two semesters altogether.  Students will learn to participate in formal and informal conversations on various topics related to school, home, daily activities, employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.  They will also explore cultural, social, historical, and political issues in Korean using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Korean 302. Korean III. Advanced Korean II is the second semester of Third-Year Korean (Advanced 2), which consists of two semesters altogether.  It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills and cultural practices learned in Advanced 1, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture as well as familiarity with interpretative, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication in Korean.  Students will continue to learn to communicate information on personal topics as well as matters of public and community interest.  They will also continue to explore topics in Korean culture, society, history, and politics, using authentic materials with connected discourse of paragraph length, and further improve their communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Requisite: Korean 301 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students.Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

BODE OMOJOLA, Professor of Music (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Music 374. Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology. Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 290W. World Music. This class is an exploration of several music traditions from around the world with an emphasis on music's role on the larger cultural/social context of each geographical area. Students will analyze how people use or have used folk, popular, and art music in different societies from four major geographic areas: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each of the areas will be the focus of a course unit of approximately three weeks that will feature a live performance by a guest artist. (Gen. Ed. AT, G)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Music 228-01. African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice. In this course, African folk opera will provide the framework for exploring salient features of African music. The course will begin by examining a wide range of performance elements, including ensemble practice, the role of dance, and musical storytelling. The second part will feature practical sessions culminating in a public performance of an African folk opera. Students will work with visiting African master drummers and choreographer. The practical sessions will afford students an opportunity to reflect on the theoretical issues examined earlier on in the semester, and gain practical knowledge of the African operatic tradition. Meets multicultural requirement; meets Humanities I-A requirement

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Music 106/BLST 214. Master Musicians of Africa I: West Africa. See MUSI 106/BLST 214.

            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Physics

 

COURTNEY LANNERT, Associate Professor of Physics (at Smith College [home campus] and the University in the Five College Program).

 

Physics 281. Computational Physics. Computational physics in a computer laboratory setting. Numerical simulations of a variety of physical systems taught concurrently with programming skills using languages such as C, Mathematica or Matlab in a UNIX environment. No prior computer experience required.

Requisites: PHYSICS 181 or 151, and MATH 132. Co-requisite: PHYSICS 182 or 152.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

PHY 117. Introductory Physics I. The concepts and relations (force, energy and momentum) describing physical interactions and the changes in motion they produce, along with applications to the physical and life sciences. Lab experiments, lectures and problem-solving activities are interwoven into each class. Discussion sections offer additional help with mathematics, data analysis and problem solving. This course satisfies medical school and engineering requirements for an introductory physics I course with labs.

Requisite: one semester introductory calculus course covering the basic principles and methods of integration and differentiation (MTH 111 or equivalent). In the spring semester, first-year students have the first opportunity to enroll. Students are enrolled in the following priority order: first-year students, then second-years, then juniors, then seniors. All upper-class student are wait-listed until first-years have registered. Sections are capped at 28.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies

 

EVGENY DENGUB, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 100Y. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Yearlong courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Russian 110 (Sections 1&2). Elementary Russian I. Beginning of four-skill language course. Russian spoken in class, grammar introduced gradually. Regular written assignments and language lab exercises to develop proficiency in all four language skills. No previous language experience required. 

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 100Y.  Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, all tenses, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course, students will be able to sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts, as well as develop an understanding of Russian culture through watching, discussing, and writing on movies, short stories, folk tales, and poems. This is a full-year course. Year-long courses cannot be divided at midyear with credit for the first semester.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Russian 221. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students will practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types, and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) will be used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

SERGEY GLEBOV, Associate Professor of History (at the Smith [Home Campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College Program).

 

FYS 154. The World of Anna Karenina. The FYS explores the social, cultural and political history of late imperial Russia through Leo Tolstoy's iconic novel Anna Karenina. Students will learn about the production of the novel but also focus on such themes as modernization and industrialization, gender and sexuality, social construction of family and marriage, empire and colonialism. They will also study the rise of realism in art and the ways in which the Russian educated classes used the new style as a form of social critique. 4 credits. 

Limited to 16 first-year students. (E)WI {H} Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

History 445/Russian 345. Revolutionary Utopia. See HIST 445/RUSS 345.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

History 239 (L). Imperial Russia, 1650–1917. The emergence, expansion and maintenance of the Russian Empire to 1929. The dynamics of pan-imperial institutions and processes (imperial dynasty, peasantry, nobility, intelligentsia, revolutionary movement), as well as the development of the multitude of nations and ethnic groups conquered by or included into the empire. Focus on how the multinational Russian empire dealt with pressures of modernization (nationalist challenges in particular), internal instability and external threats. {H} 4 credits.
            Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

IRINA KOGEL, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

Russian 230. Intermediate Russian I. Emphasis on grammar, simple conversation and readings. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Requisite: RUSSIAN 120 or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 301. Advanced Russian. Conducted in Russian. Grammatical structure, principles of word building, exercises, translation, readings, close analysis of texts. Goal: understanding lectures in Russian; ability to respond with some degree of fluency; vocabulary sufficient to be able to read using a dictionary.

Requisite: a year of intermediate Russian or equivalent.  Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

RES 102. Elementary Russian. Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, unprefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Russian 120. Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 110.

Requisite: RUSS 110 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Russian 240. Intermediate Russian II. Continuation of RUSS 230.

Requisite: RUSS 230 or equivalent.  Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.   

 

SUSANNA NAZAROVA, Five College Lecturer in Russian.

 

RES 101. Elementary Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.
            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 201. Intermediate Russian. In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.     

            Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

REES 220. Intermediate Russian. The course is designed to address the needs of both second language learners (those who completed Elementary Russian) and heritage students (who speak Russian at home). Students practice all four language modalities: reading, listening, writing and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities that are based on a range of topics, text types and different socio-cultural situations. Authentic texts (poems, short stories, TV programs, films, songs and articles) are used to create the context for reviewing and expanding on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. This is a full-year course.

            Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

RES 202. Intermediate Russian Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian. 

Requisite: RES 201. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

RES 251. Advanced Russian. This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Women’s Studies

 

ANGELA WILLEY, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College program).

 

CSI 231. Feminism’s Sciences. For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies 393A.  Reading Audre Lorde. Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both "essentialist" and "antiessentialist" (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde's erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde's writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde's rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?
            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 

Five College Programs & Certificates

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FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in less-commonly taught languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

            Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402.

              Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 202.

Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this year-long course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to senior, junior, and sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30.

Combined enrollment 142/242. This course is an exploration of the various dance styles, forms and symbols attributed to the classical societies of Western Africa. The course focuses on those dances whose origins are (historically) found in the Old Mali Empire, (i.e., Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It specifically examines the dance styles of the Serer, Lebou, Djiolla, Bambara, Wolof, Sauce, Malinke, Manding, Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions.

Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. Cultural Dance Forms. To understand the significance of dance in Africa and the connection between musician and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Adding new elements each class, the complexity of the dances will build throughout the semester. Discussions on African culture will provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. In addition to learning African dance technique, students will view dance videos from Africa.

            Spring semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

English

 

JANE DEGENHARDT, Associate Professor of English (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

English 891MG. Early Modern Global Economics, Imperialism and Discourses of Fortune.  This course will explore the ways that early modern England’s economic transformation and nascent colonial exploration produced, and were in turn ideologically justified by, new understandings of the nature of luck, chance, and fortune. We will think about how these interlinked developments relate to narratives of secularization and modernity. By extension, we will explore how travel, commercial exchange, and colonial exploration gave rise to new ways of knowing and navigating the world through human perception, feelings, and ambitions. How did these globalized enterprises lend themselves to new forms of inter-personal intimacy, as well as to new configurations of the relationships between humans and the larger ecologies of the natural and supernatural worlds?

We will also consider how shifting understandings of fortune became fused with moral purpose, and how the human pursuit of economic fortune became associated with virtuous national and imperial gains. In what ways were chance, luck, and divine providence employed to justify violence, inequalities, and formations of racial difference? How can a cultural history of early capitalism equip us to approach modern-day global capitalism in a more informed and ethical manner?

The plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries will be foregrounded, but we will also investigate a variety of influential writers on the topic of fortune, including Lucretius, Boethius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Bacon, and others. Plays may include Antony and Cleopatra, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, The Tempest, and The Comedy of Errors, as well as lesser-known plays by Heywood, Dekker, Jonson, and Marlowe. In addition, we will sample some early modern travel writing and economic treatises.

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 232. Intimacy in Shakespeare. What forms did intimacy take on the Shakespearean stage, and how was it shaped by new understandings of global distance, as well as by the material and social conditions of the live theater? This course offers in-depth explorations of a wide range of Shakespeare's plays with special consideration of new forms of intimacy between lovers, spouses, friends, family members, adversaries, and strangers. In particular, we will consider how new scales and experiences of space and time transformed interpersonal relationships. For example, how did global travel, trade, and colonialism affect understandings of difference, sameness, and intimacy? How did Shakespeare's plays imagine new possibilities for intimate forms of violence, empathy, and understanding? We will address these questions through close readings of the plays, supplemented by considerations of social, economic, and scientific history. Likely readings include Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Two Noble Kinsmen, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, Othello, and Cymbeline.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

      

Film/Video

 

BABA HILLMAN, Associate Professor of Video/Film Production (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

HACU 287. Performance and Directing. This is an advanced production/theory course for video and film students interested in developing and strengthening the element of performance in their work. How does performance for the camera differ from performance for the stage? How do we find a physical language and a camera language that expand upon one another in a way that liberates the imagination? This course will explore performance and directing in their most diverse possibilities, in a context specific to film and videomakers. The class will emphasize the development of individual approaches to relationships between performance, text, sound and image. We will discuss visual and verbal gesture, dialogue and voice-over, variations of approach with actors and non-actors, camera movement and rhythm within the shot, and the structuring of performance in short and long form works. Screenings and readings will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to directing and performance. We will study works by Shirin Neshat, Vera Chytilova, Pedro Costa, John Akomfrah, John Cassavetes, Ousmane Sembene, Eija Liisa Ahtila and the Wooster Group among others. Students will complete three projects.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

HACU 263. Film and Poetry. This advanced practice/theory course explores a poetics of word and image, a poetics of resistance, dream and revelation in film and text. Working with both visual and spoken text, we will consider a series of questions: How do words fall on an image? How do we choose a certain word, a certain phrase in relation to an image? Does the image function as an illustration of the words or does it expand upon the words in a different visual direction and if so, how is that operating? How does the choice of each word, each phrase, the music of how they are strung together, the degree of formality or edge or speed in the reading, how do all of these carry an energetic charge and meaning that comes from the relationship of the voice to the ideas in the poem to the image itself? How do poetry and film work together across cultures and languages, from early cinema to contemporary digital and analog works for single channel and installation? We will study films and installations by Shirin Neshat, Nicolas Rey, Masayuki Kawai, John Akomfrah, Ruben Gamez, Anri Sala and Sergei Paradjanov. Readings include the poetry of Aracelis Girmay, Anna Akhmatova, Paul Celan, Aime Cesaire, Audre Lorde and Wislawa Szymborska, as well as writings on the role of the poet in times of revolution and resistance. Students will complete individual and collaborative projects combining poetry and still and moving images. Students may work in 16mm, Super 8 or digital formats.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

BERNADINE MELLIS, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program).

 

Film Studies 210VP. Beginning Video Production. This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Requisite: FLMST-201.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.


Film and Media Studies 282. Advanced Production Workshop.
We will take skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them through the creation of one 10-minute project. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films. We may take this opportunity to learn the conventions of our chosen form or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking. The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production. Application and permission of instructor required. Limited to 10 students. Special Application Required.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Film Studies 310. Advanced Projects in Video Production. In this class, we will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. You may work individually or in pairs. We will learn by making work as well as by researching, reading, and watching films related to our projects. We may take this opportunity to delve into and learn the conventions of our chosen form. Or we may decide that our content demands formal experimentation and risk-taking.The course will be structured by the projects each student brings to it.

Requisite: Introduction to Video Production or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to 10 students.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Film and Media Studies 280. Introduction to Video Production. As an introduction to video production, the course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video; development of a viable story idea or concept; the role of sound and how to record it well; and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing.  You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. In addition to video exercises/projects and screenings, you will also do reading assignments and writing exercises.

Requisite:  Film & Media Studies 150 or its equivalent. Application and permission of instructor required.  Limited to12 students.          Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Geosciences

 

J. MICHAEL RHODES, Professor of Geochemistry (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

Geology 105.  Dynamic Earth. The earth is a dynamic planet, constantly creating oceans and mountain ranges, accompanied by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This course explores the ideas that led to the scientific revolution of plate tectonics; how plate tectonics provides a comprehensive theory explaining how and why volcanoes and earthquakes occur; and the hazards that they produce and their impact on humans. Emphasis is placed on current earthquake and volcanic events, as well as on momentous events from the past, such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii, and the more recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens (Washington), Pinatubo (Philippines) and Kilauea (Hawaii). (Gen.Ed. PS)

Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Geosciences 591V. Seminar: Volcanology. Systematic discussion of volcanic phenomena, types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of volcanism, volcanic impact on humans, and the monitoring and forecasting of volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes illustrate principles of volcanology; particular attention to Hawaiian, ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section.

To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

            Hebrew

 

JOANNA CARAVITA, Five College Lecturer in Hebrew.

 

Judaic 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary.

Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Hebrew 110. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Hebrew 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. To improve third year students' grammar, vocabulary, and fluency through graded readings to advanced level of reading, listening, oral, and written proficiency. A structured approach to literature.

Requisite: HEBREW 240 or 246 or equivalent. Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Judaic 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. The second half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. By the end of the year, students are able to comprehend short and adapted literary and journalistic texts, describe themselves and their environment, and express their thoughts and opinions. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film.  .{F} 5 credits. 

Requisite: JUD 101 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Hebrew 120. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab.

Requisite: HEB 110.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

International Relations

 

MICHAEL T. KLARE, Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

America and the World: U.S. Foreign Policy in a Turbulent Era.  The next U.S. president will face a world dramatically transformed from that encountered by Barack Obama when he first assumed office in 2009. China and Russia have become far more assertive in their respective zones of interest, the civil war in Syria has claimed nearly a half-million lives and triggered a devastating refugee crisis in Europe, ISIS has spread terror and violence in numerous countries, and climate change has begun to alter the planet in terrifying ways. President Obama sought to address foreign challenges with minimal reliance on military force, but many politicians- - including the two candidates for president in 2016--argued that he was not forceful enough. Now, with a new president, we can expect sweeping changes in the way Washington conducts its foreign relations. This course will assess the legacy of the Obama administration and the ways in which U.S. foreign policy is likely to change under a new administration. Students will be expected to follow and discuss current affairs, to read selected texts and articles on the subject, and to submit a research paper on some aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

JON WESTERN, Professor of International Relations (at Mount Holyoke College in the Five College Program) will be serving as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Mount Holyoke College.

 

Korean

 

FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Languages through the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages

The Five College Center for the Study of World Languages offers courses in Less-Commonly Taught Languages not available through regular Five College classroom courses. The Center also offers courses in Spoken Arabic dialects for students who have learned Modern Standard Arabic in the classroom. The Center encourages students to embark on language study during their first year of college so that they can achieve the fluency needed to use the language for work in their major field.

Each language offered by the Center is available in one of three course formats depending upon the resources available for that language. Mentored courses provide the highest level of structured support for learning and cover all four primary language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Independent Plus courses focus on speaking and listening skills, plus the development of basic literacy in the language. Supervised Independent courses focus only on oral skills and rely on more independently organized learning than the other course formats.

All courses emphasize development of oral proficiency through weekly conversation practice sessions. Conversation sessions focus on using the language in the types of situations one might encounter in everyday life. Students commonly engage in role plays, question and answer activities, description, narration, and problem-solving exercises. More advanced students practice expressing opinions, giving reasons in arguments, and discussing current events and cultural issues.

Students in Mentored courses also have one-on-one tutorials with a professional language mentor trained in language pedagogy. The individual sessions allow each student to get help with his/her particular questions and concerns. The language mentor goes over written homework, explains grammatical concepts, and engages the student in skill-building activities. Language mentors also work with students who are already fluent speakers of a language but who need to learn to read and write in the language.

Students in Independent Plus courses have a modified version of the weekly individual tutorial that involves a one-on-one meeting with a peer-tutor who is a well-educated native speaker of the language. Peer-tutors help students identify and self-correct errors in speech and written homework and facilitate activities that practice basic literacy and communication in the language.

Supervised Independent courses offer students with excellent language skills an opportunity to study a variety of less commonly taught languages independently.  Students approved for Supervised Independent language study are highly motivated, have a record of past success in language learning, and demonstrate readiness to undertake independent work. Courses emphasize development of oral skills.

A standard course through the Center is a half course. Half courses require one hour a day (seven hours per week) of individual study plus weekly conversation and/or tutorial sessions. It takes four half courses (levels I, II, III, and IV) to complete the equivalent of one year of study in a traditional elementary-level classroom course. Some languages offered in the Mentored format are also available as full courses allowing students to progress at the same rate as in traditional classroom courses. Full courses require two hours per day (14 hours per week) of individual study plus conversation and tutorial sessions.

Students interested in studying a language through the Center should read the informational websites thoroughly and follow the application instructions. While the application process is handled by the Five College Center for the Study of World Languages, the tutorial and conversation sessions are held on all five campuses. 

For program information and application forms, go to http://fivecolleges.edu/fclang

For language resources produced by the Center, see http://langmedia.fivecolleges.edu

 

Language offerings change depending upon available resources. Not all languages are available every semester. Please see the Center’s website for current information or contact the Center to find out about a language not listed here.

 

Currently Offered in Mentored Format: American Sign Languages (upper-level courses), Hindi, Persian, Swahili, Turkish.

 

Currently Offered in Independent Plus Format: Indonesian, Urdu, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian.

 

Currently Offered in Supervised Independent Format: African Languages: Afrikaans, Amharic, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba, Zulu.     

 

European Languages:  Albanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Georgian, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Modern Irish, Norwegian, Romanian, Ukrainian.

 

Asian Languages: Bangla/Bengali, Burmese, Cantonese for Mandarin Speakers, Dari, Filipino, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Mongolian, Nepali, Pashto, Sinhala, Thai, Tibetan, Vietnamese.

 

Languages of the Americas: Haitian Creole.

 

Spoken Arabic Courses in Mentored or Supervised Independent Format: Egyptian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Moroccan Arabic, and other dialects

 

                    

African Studies

 

KIM YI DIONNE, Assistant Professor of Government (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology

 

FELICITY AULINO, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Five College program), will be on leave in 2017-18.

Arabic

 

HEBA ARAFAH, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, will be on leave in 2017-18.

 

MAY GEORGE, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Arabic 200. Intermediate Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite is ARA 100Y or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 100Y (Sections 1&2). Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

MOHAMED HASSAN, Senior Lecturer in Arabic and Director of the Five College Arabic Language Program.

 

Arabic 101. First-Year Arabic I. See Arab 101.

                Fall semester. Amherst College.

Arabic 401. Media Arabic. See ARAB 401. 

            Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 102. First-Year Arabic II. See ARAB 102.

Requisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

Arabic 402. Topics in Arabic Language and Culture. See ARAB 402. will be able to listen to and understand the main points and details of a speech, academic lecture or

                Requisite: ARAB 302 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

NAHLA KHALIL, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Arabic 101.  Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year               

Fall semester. University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic I. According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.

Requisite:  ARA 102 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 102. Elementary Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Arabic 202. Intermediate Four-Skilled Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and active ties include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

ALAA RAZEQ, Visiting Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

LS 110. Elementary Arabic I. This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

Fall semester. Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

 LS 110. Elementary Arabic II. This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Arabic 302. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

SYONARA TOMOUM, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

Asian 130 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic I.  This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic in addition to brief exposures to one of the Arabic dialects. It is aligned with the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Following ACTFL proficiency standards, students should be at the Novice Mid-High level by the end of this course. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic sounds and progresses quickly toward developing beginner reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency as well as cultural competence. It covers vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to read and analyze a range of texts at the Novice level. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises from AlKitaab series, students will write short paragraphs and participate in role plays, presentations and conversations throughout the year.

                Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College. 

 

Asian 232f.  Second-Year Arabic I.  According to the ACTFL standards, by the end of this course, students will be at the Intermediate Low-Mid proficiency level. It covers the four skills of the language. Writers at the Intermediate level are characterized by the ability to meet practical writing needs, such as simple messages and letters, requests for information, and notes. In addition, they can ask and respond to simple questions in writing. At the Intermediate level, listeners can understand information conveyed in simple, sentence-length speech on familiar or everyday topics while readers at the same level can understand information conveyed in simple, predictable, loosely connected texts. Readers rely heavily on contextual clues. They can most easily understand information if the format of the text is familiar, such as in a weather report or a social announcement. Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning.

Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites of AlKitaab series. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. 

Requisite: Asian 131 or the equivalent.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I. The goal of this course is to help students achieve an Upper-Intermediate level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach.  Students will read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world.  Text types address a range of political, social, religious, and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles, and periods.  All of these texts may include narration indifferent time frames, description, hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that will cover both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This continues Al-Kitaab series, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 202, or its equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Asian 131 (Sections 1&2).  First-Year Arabic II.  This is a continuation of First-Year Arabic I. Students will complete the study of the Elementary Arabic AlKitaab book series along with additional instructional materials. Emphasis will be on the integrated development of all language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking – using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students will acquire vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, and language skills necessary for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate with a limited working proficiency in a variety of situations, read and write about a variety of factual material and familiar topics in non-technical prose. In addition to the textbook exercises, students will write short essays, do oral and video presentations and participate in role plays, discussions, and conversations throughout the semester in addition to extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisites: Asian 130 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Asian 233. Second-Year Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

Requisite: Asian 232 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

JOHN WEINERT, Five College Lecturer in Arabic.

 

ARAB 201. Second-Year Arabic I. See ARAB 201.

            Requisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent.  Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

 Arabic 300. Advanced Arabic I.  This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials.

Requisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 201. Intermediate Arabic II. This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. Students will continue the study of the AlKitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, students will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, students should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. Students will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable them to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, students should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.

            Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester.  Smith College.

 

Arabic 202. Second-Year Arabic II. See Arabic 202.

Requisite: Arabic 201 or equivalent, or instructor’s permission.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

Arabic 301. Advanced Arabic II. This course aims to help students reach Advanced proficiency in Arabic through language study and content work focused on Arabic themes in Literature, history, film, and current events. Students continue to focus on developing truly active control of a large vocabulary through communicative activities. Grammatical work focuses on complex grammatical constructions and demands increased accuracy in understanding and producing complex structures in extended discourse. Preparation for class and active, cooperative participation in group activities are essential to students’ progress in this course. Requirements also include active participation in class, weekly essays, occasional exams and presentations and a final written exam. This course utilizes Al-Kitaab, Book 3, in addition to extra instructional materials. 

Requisite: ARA 301, or the equivalent.  Students must be able to use Formal Spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.  Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Archaeology

 

ELIZABETH KLARICH, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (at Smith College in the Five College Program).

 

Anthropology 216 CA. Collecting the Past: Art/Artifacts. Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Not open to first-year students.  Requisite:  One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.  Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

Anthropology 135/Archaeology 135. Introduction to Archaeology. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored.

Limited to 30 first- and second-year students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

ANT 226. Archaeology of Food. This course explores how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago.  The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution."  The second half examines case studies from the major centers of domestication in order to investigate the biological, economic and social implications of these processes.  Special emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

            Spring semester. Smith College.

Anthropology 224.  Archaeological Method, Theory and Practice.  See ANTH 224.      
            Spring semester.  Amherst College.

Architectural Studies

 

GABRIEL ARBOLEDA, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design (at Hampshire [home campus] and Amherst colleges in the Five College program).

 

Architectural Studies 101/Art and the History of Art 101. The Language of Architecture. See ARCH/ARHA 101. 

            Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 248. Architectural Anthropology. This class explores the emerging interdisciplinary space between the architecture and anthropology fields. We study the ethics, methods, and subject interests of architectural anthropology in both theory (as a research approach to the built environment) and practice (specific proposals of building with and/or for cultural identity). This is a theory seminar with a visual analysis component.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architectural Studies 104/Art and the History of Art 104. Housing, Urbanization, and Development. See ARCH/ARHA 104. 

Limited to 25 students. Priority to majors, then sophomores.  Spring semester. Amherst College.

 

HACU 275. Sustainable Design. This course explores the notion of sustainability in architectural design theory and practice. We first study the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and then how these tenets materialize in the practice. Then, we examine sustainable design against social issues such as inequality and marginality. This is a theory seminar that should provide a strong basis for a critical engagement with the practice of sustainability in the design field. We study our topic through class discussions, site visits, and analytical exercises.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

NAOMI DARLING, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Architecture (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

CSI 241/HACU 241. Designing for Life. This two-semester course, with an integrated Jan-term field component in Thailand, investigates the intersections of design (building and land use), anthropology/social justice, and ecology, with a focus on a case study in Northern Thailand. The fall semester will build background and theoretical knowledge in these areas generally and our case study in Thailand specifically. Students will critically examine ways in which design is influenced by cultural, historical, and ecological factors. They will learn about social justice issues in Southeast Asia that are impacted by structural forms of agriculture, climate change, economics, and social structure. How can architectural and land use design empower rural peoples? What does resilience look like for rural farmers who face significant economic, social, and ecological change? Over January, selected students will accompany the faculty to our field site in Northern Thailand for primary research. Second semester will be project based with students working in interdisciplinary teams of anthropology/ecology/architecture students. Instructor permission required, with prerequisites for architecture students and a background in either Asian studies, ethnographic methods, and/or ecology for other students.

            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Architecture 403. Design V Studio.  Projects developed to explore the principles and process of architectural design and the development of structure and enclosure. Design projects, sketch problems. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BFA-Arch majors.

Open to Undergraduate Architecture (BFA) majors only.  Requisite: ARCH 401.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

HACU 241. Designing for Life - Part 2. Spring semester of this yearlong course will be a project-based semester with students working in collaborative interdisciplinary teams (with the fall course as a prerequisite) to develop research-based design proposals across multiple scales. The projects will include developing a land use plan / master plan, developing building designs that seem most relevant to the local people, and possibly developing smaller-scale design projects as needed – all of these projects will be informed by and integrate research related to the cultural, social, and/or ecological issues from Nan Province, Thailand. At the end of the semester, each project team will produce a series of drawings as well as a project research paper that presents the design projects within the context of the research questions most pressing to each team. It is expected that students will represent their disciplines of study as “experts” within each team and that teams will share information and research. Class time will be spent discussing the larger contexts of the projects with both student and faculty presentations and in-studio working sessions with critiques, pin-ups and reviews of the design proposals and reports.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

 

ARCH 225-01.  Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design: Principles of Environmental Design. This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.

Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

THOM LONG, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design (at Hampshire College in the Five College Program).

 

Architecture 205AD. Intro: Sculpting Space. This studio course will be a design investigation of a particular theme in or approach to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop and apply traditional and contemporary architectural skills (sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation) to interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form, and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Architectural Studies 216/Art and the History of Art 216. Intermediate Architectural Design.  See ARCH/ARHA 216. 

Requisite: ARHA 111. Admission with consent of the instructor.  Limited to 12 students.  Spring semester.  Amherst College.

 

HACU 207. CMYK: Graphic Design Studio. Graphic design is a creative and critical practice at the intersection of communication and abstraction. The process of learning graphic design is two-fold, and students in this course will engage both areas: first, students will develop knowledge and fluency with design skills––in this case, software (Photoshop/Illustrator); second students will address the challenges of design head-on through discussion, practice, iteration, critique and experimentation. The projects will challenge students to explore raster and vector graphic forms, color theory and typography in creative, experimental ways to reach their objectives. Techniques, approaches, styles and processes for representing numbers, maps, philosophies and ideas will be introduced throughout the course. As a studio and software course, it will be fast-paced and immersive and will require a substantial amount of work outside of class time. The course will be made up of several small, fast-paced projects and culminate in one longer, more engaged print design project. This course is geared toward students with a design-focused course of study.

            Spring semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art and Technology

 

CONOR PETERSON, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program).

 

IA 178. Technology Essentials for Artists. This studio art course offers foundational skills for those artists who wish to explore the possibilities of technology in their work. With an eye on cybernetics, students will study and produce works of interactive art that examine the relationship between humans and their computers, whether that vision is utopian, dystopian or somewhere in between. Topics to be covered include programming, interfacing with microcontrollers, and DIY electronics; no prior experience is assumed.
            Fall semester.  Hampshire College.

 

Art Studio 263. Intermediate Digital Media. This course builds working knowledge of multimedia digital artwork through experience with a variety of software, focusing on video and time-based media. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration. Students may require additional supplies as well and are responsible for purchasing them directly.

Limited  to 14 students.  Fall semester.  Smith College.

 

IA 242. Whole in Space: Technology and Sculpture in the Expanded Field. Nearly 40 years ago Rosalind Krauss advanced her theory of the "expanded field" to interrogate the relationship between sculpture, architecture and landscape. Has our media-centric post-internet condition expanded the field of sculpture once again? This studio art course seeks to explore that question and more, with notions of beauty and the technological sublime serving as a compass. Split equally between the electronics lab and shop, students will put the "physical" in "physical computing" by learning basic fabrication techniques to realize computerized artworks. In the electronics lab we will take a deeper look at programming microcontrollers with an eye on techniques relevant to sound, light, data gathering, telepresence and interactivity. Students should anticipate spending at least $150 on materials; access to a laptop is recommended but not required.

            Spring semester. Hampshire College.

     

JOHN SLEPIAN, Associate Professor of Art and Technology (at Hampshire [home campus] and Smith Colleges in the Five College Program) and Dean of Interdisciplinary Arts, Hampshire College.

 

ARS 162. Introduction to Digital Multimedia. An introduction to the use of digital media in the context of contemporary art practice. Students explore content development and design principles through a series of projects involving text, still image and moving image. This class involves critical discussions of studio projects in relation to contemporary art and theory. A required fee of $25 to cover group-supplied materials is charged at the time of registration.

            Limited to 14 students.   Spring semester. Smith College.

 

Asian/Pacific/American Studies

 

RICHARD CHU, Associate Professor of History (at the University of Massachusetts in the Five College Program).

 

First-Year Seminar 110DC. Chinese Diasporic Communities. How does a study of the Chinese diasporic communities in Southeast Asia, the U.S., and other parts of the world help us rethink concepts of 'Chinese-ness'? We seek to answer the question in this introductory history seminar on the Chinese diaspora. Coverage spans from the 1500s to the present. Readings focus on the question of Chinese-ness as constructed and negotiated by different groups and individuals. Themes include imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, nationalism, transnationalism, orientalism, hegemony, and globalization.

Open to first-year students only.  Fall semester. Mount Holyoke College.

 

History 247.  Empire, Race, and the Philippines. This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, G).

            Not open to first-year students.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Honors College 391AH. Honors Seminar 2: Topics. This seminar is a required course for Commonwealth Honors College students where students participate in a topical seminar-style course designed by its instructor. While the subject matter of each section is different, advanced knowledge of the topic is not required. While the subject matter of each section is different, the requirements for each section are the same.

Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth College students only.  Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

History 253. Asian/Pacific/American History. Ever wonder what groups constitute the Asian American communities in the state of Massachusetts and in the Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, and what they are doing to empower and help themselves? This course combines the methods of historical inquiry and community engagement, and is designed for students who are willing to learn more about Asian Americans both inside and outside the classroom. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to concepts of community engagement, and required to report on the general history of specific Asian subgroups (e.g. Chinese, Korean, Indian, Japanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Filipino, Tibetan). In the second half of the course, students will apply the concept of community engagement as they conduct research (that would include community visitations and/or interviews) on the different Asian subgroups found in the Five Colleges/Pioneer Valley/Western Massachusetts, focusing on their history of and reasons for migration, demography (based on government census records), community needs and issues, and different activities and organizations.   

Spring semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Biology

 

JOOHYUN LEE, Part-time Lecturer and Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Biology.

 

Biology 475. Plant Cell Biology. This course will cover the cell biological aspects of several plant cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell expansion, tip growth, cell-to-cell communication, and intracellular protein sorting. An emphasis will be made on experimental approaches used to understand these processes at the molecular level. A discussion of model organisms and cell types will be included.

            Fall semester.  University of Massachusetts.

 

Computer Science

 

DANIEL SHELDON, Assistant Professor of Computer Science (at the University of Massachusetts Amherst [home campus] and Mount Holyoke College in the Five College program).

 

Computer Science 312. Algorithms. How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.
            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance

 

MARILYN SYLLA, Five College Lecturer in Dance (at Smith College in the Five College Program)

 

Theater and Dance 142H. Contemporary Dance: West African. See THDA 142H.

            Fall semester.  Amherst College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Fall semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance I. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.

Limited to 30 students.  Fall semester. Smith College.

 

Dance 142. West African Dance. The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture. Repeatable for credit.

            Spring semester.  Mount Holyoke College.

 

Dance 142/242. West African Dance I/II. Combined enrollment Spring 2018 142/242. This course introduces African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture a