Public Copeland Events




Undergraduates and Public Scholarship in the Humanities: Reading, Interpreting and Editing Wikipedia
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Please join us on Tuesday, March 27 at 4PM in the Friendly Reading Room at Frost Library for the program Undergraduates and Public Scholarship in the Humanities: Reading, Interpreting and Editing Wikipedia. Historian Martha Saxton, Academic Technologist Scott Payne and Librarian Missy Roser reflect on how public knowledge is produced and contested. Panelists draw from experiences with an ongoing project with students to edit and look critically at Wikipedia and explore this new reference source's implications for teaching, technology and librarianship.  For more background on the student work see: http://writinghistory.trincoll.edu/teach/wikipedia-and-womens-history-saxton-etal/. This event is sponsored by the Copeland Colloquium and Frost Library and is part of a year-long series focusing on The Future of the Humanities in the Age of Technics. Refreshments will be served.


Translation in the Age of Google Translate

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Please join us on Friday, March 9, at noon for “Translation in the Age of Google Translate." Amherst College languages and literature faculty members Cathy Ciepiela, Laure Katsaros, and Andrew Parker investigate the future of language instruction in the context of new computational tools. This event is sponsored by the Copeland Colloquium and Frost Library and is part of a year-long series focusing on The Future of the Humanities in the Age of Technics. Friendly Reading Room at Frost Library. Lunch will be provided.



The Future of the Humanities and the Problem of Instrumental Reason

On Friday and Saturday, March 2-3, 2012, in the Alumni House at Amherst College, there will be a conference titled The Future of the Humanities and the Problem of Instrumental Reason.”  The conference will feature presentations from a number of distinguished humanities experts including Geoffrey Harpham (Director of the National Humanities Center), Catherine Liu (UCI Humanities Center, Film & Media Studies School), Jonathan H. Marks (Penn State), John Mowitt (University of Minnesota), Robert Gibbs (University of Toronto) and Caryl Emerson (Princeton University). The conference is sponsored by the 2011-12 Copeland Colloquium, as part of a series of events organized by an informal group of Amherst Faculty to consider the future of humanities and to stimulate campus-wide conversation about how to advance thinking about humanities on the Amherst campus. 



The Future of Humanities at Amherst College Invitation to Participate

As part of the campus-wide conversation about how to advance thinking about humanities on the Amherst campus, the college community is invited to take part in a series of lectures and panels being held at the Frost Library this year.  (click here for the schedule of events for the Spring semester)

These events are co-sponsored by the 2011-12 Copeland Colloquium, as part of a series of Copeland events on the theme of “The Future of the Humanities at Amherst College.”

The first event for the Spring 2012 semester took place on Tuesday, January 31.  (Hear the discussion

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"Scientific advances and Humanistic Responses: How Do Developments in Science, Biotechnology, Neuroscience, Computation, or Technology Challenge Us to Rethink What It Means To Be Human?"

Please join us on Tuesday, January 31, at 3:30 p.m. in the Periodical Room of Frost Library for a program featuring reflections by scientists and responses by humanists at Amherst College on the question of how new scientific and technological developments impact what it means to be human. 

Refreshments will be provided.


The Future of the Humanities From Where I Sit:

Tuesday, November 15, 2011, 3:30 p.m.
Periodical Room, Frost Library

Four of this year's Copeland Fellows will reflect on the future of the humanities from each of their disciplinary, geographical, and institutional perspectives. Claire Katz, Premesh Lalu, Ruth Miller, and Anne-Lise Francois will share observations about the evolution of their disciplines and perceptions of their work within the academy, among policy makers, and beyond the ivory tower.
This event is sponsored by the Copeland Colloquium and Frost Library and is part of a year-long series focusing on The Future of the Humanities in the Age of Technics.


Lecture: “After the Humanities”
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Marjorie Garber
William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of English and Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 4:30 p.m.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall, Amherst College

Marjorie Garber is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of English and Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. She has published sixteen books and edited seven collections of essays on topics from Shakespeare to literary and cultural theory to the arts and intellectual life. Garber has served as Director of the Humanities Center at Harvard and is the former President of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes. She currently serves as a Trustee of the English Institute and on the Board of Directors of the American Council of Learned Societies.  Her new work, “The Use and Abuse of Literature,” is about “why we read literature, why we study it, and why it doesn’t need to have an application someplace else in or-der to be definitive in its talking about human life and culture.”


Future of the Humanities Conference

March 2-3, 2012
Amherst College Alumni House
Presentations:
Geoffrey Harpham, Director of the National Humanities Center
Catherine Liu, Director, UCI Humanities Center, Film and Media Studies School
Jonathan Marks, Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities and Law at Penn State
John Mowitt, University of MinnesotaRobert Gibbs, Professor of Philosophy, University of Toronto
Caryl Emerson, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literature, Princeton University.

The conference schedule is available in advance  in Clark House (second floor) or by email. Contact Megan Estes at mlestes@amherst.edu.