Asian Languages and Civilizations
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Amherst College Asian Languages and Civilizations for 2009-10

Arabic

01 First-Year Arabic I

This year-long course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic, also known as Classical Arabic. It begins with a coverage of the alphabet, vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will concentrate on speaking and listening skills, as well as on learning the various forms of regular verbs, and on how to use an Arabic dictionary. 

Fall semester.  Five College Lecturer Hasnaoui.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

02 First-Year Arabic II

A continuation of Arabic 01.

Requisite: Arabic 01 or equivalent.  Spring semester.  Five College Lecturer Hasnaoui.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

03 Second-Year Arabic I

This course expands the scope of the communicative approach, as new grammatical points are introduced (irregular verbs), and develops a greater vocabulary for lengthier conversations. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing short passages and personal notes. This second-year of Arabic completes the introductory grammatical foundation necessary for understanding standard forms of Arabic prose (classical and modern literature, newspapers, film, etc.) and making substantial use of the language.

Requisite: Arabic 02 or equivalent. Fall semester.  Five College Lecturer Hasnaoui.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

04 Second-Year Arabic II

Continued conversations at a more advanced level, with increased awareness of time-frames and complex patterns of syntax. Further development of reading and practical writing skills.

Requisite: Arabic 03 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Spring semester.  Five College Lecturer Hasnaoui.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

15 Introduction to Buddhist Traditions

(Offered as Religion 23 and Asian 15 [SA].) This course is an introduction to the diverse ideals, practices, and traditions of Buddhism from its origins in South Asia to its geographical and historical diffusion throughout Asia and, more recently, into the west. We will explore the Three Jewels--the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha--and how they each provide refuge for those suffering in samsara (the endless cycle of rebirth). We will engage in close readings of the literary and philosophical texts central to Buddhism, as well as recent historical and anthropological studies of Buddhist traditions.

Fall semester. Professor Heim.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

19 The Tea Ceremony and Japanese Culture

(Offered as Art 83 and Asian 19.) An examination of the history of chanoyu, the tea ceremony, from its origins in the fifteenth century to the practice of tea today. The class will explore the various elements that comprise the tea environment-the garden setting, the architecture of the tea room, the forms of tea utensils, and the elements of the kaiseki meal. Through a study of the careers of influential tea masters and texts that examine the historical, religious, and cultural background to tea culture, the class will also trace how the tea ceremony has become a metaphor for Japanese culture and Japanese aesthetics both in Japan and in the West. There will be field trips to visit tea ware collections, potters and tea masters. Two class meetings per week.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Professor Morse.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

20 Reinventing Tokyo: The Art, Literature, and Politics of Japan's Modern Capital

[J] Tokyo is the political, cultural, and economic center of Japan, the largest urban conglomeration on the planet, holding 35 million people, fully one fifth of Japan’s population.  Since its founding 400 years ago, when a small fishing village became Edo, the castle headquarters of the Tokugawa shoguns, the city has been reinvented multiple times—as the birthplace of Japan’s early modern urban bourgeoise culture, imperial capital to a nation-state, center of modern consumer culture, postwar democratic exemplar, and postmodern metropolis. The course will focus on the portrayals of Tokyo and its reinventions in art, literature, and politics from the end of the Edo period to the present day.  It will examine the changes that took place as the city modernized and Westernized in the Meiji era, became the center of modern urban life in Japan before the Second World War, and rebuilt itself as part of the country’s economic miracle in the postwar era.  As the largest human cultural creation in Japan, one that endured political upheavals, fires, earthquakes, fire-bombings and unbridled development, Tokyo has always been a complex subject. The course will use that complexity to consider how to analyze an urban environment that draws upon Japan's long history, yet which is also one of the most modern in Asia.

Preference to majors and students with an interest in urban studies.  Limited to 25 students.  Fall semester.  Professors Maxey and Morse.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2012

21 Traditional Japanese Literature

[J] This course is an introduction to traditional Japanese literature from the beginning of Japan’s written language to the early commercialization of literature around 1800. The course is organized thematically, but will move in chronological fashion. Whether dealing with tales of courtly romance, the stirring account of the Genpei War in The Tale of the Heike, 17-syllable haiku poems, or the explosively popular play, Chûshingura (the famous story of the 47 rônin), special emphasis will be placed throughout the term on the communal production/consumption of literature, which is one of the distinctive features of artistic life in premodern Japan. This course assumes no prior knowledge of Japan or Japanese, and all texts are taught using English translations.

Limited to 20 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Van Compernolle.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2010, Fall 2013

22 Indian Civilization

(Offered as Anthropology 21 and Asian 22 [SA].)  A general introduction to Indian civilization. The course will survey South Asia’s most important social, political, and religious traditions and institutions. It will emphasize the historical framework within which Indian civilization has developed its most characteristic cultural and social patterns. This course is designed for students who are new to South Asia, or for those who have some knowledge of South Asia but have not studied it at the college level.

Fall semester. Professor Babb.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011

23 Arts of Japan

(Offered as Art 48 and Asian 23 [J].)  A survey of the history of Japanese art from neolithic times to the present. Topics will include Buddhist art and its ritual context, the aristocratic arts of the Heian court, monochromatic ink painting and the arts related to the Zen sect, the prints and paintings of the Floating World and contemporary artists and designers such as Ando Tadao and Miyake Issey. The class will focus on the ways Japan adopts and adapts foreign cultural traditions. There will be field trips to look at works in museums and private collections in the region.

Spring semester. Professor Morse.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2016

24 Chinese Civilization to 1800

(Offered as History 15 [ASP] and Asian 24 [C].) A survey of Chinese history from ancient times to the eighteenth century. We will focus on texts and artifacts to explore the classical roots and historical development of Chinese statecraft, philosophy, religion, art, and literature. Using these media for evidence, we will trace the histories of inter-state relations, imperial institutions, global commerce, and family-based society through the ancient Han empire, the great age of Buddhism, the medieval period of global trade, and the Confucian bureaucratic empires that followed the Mongol world conquest. We will also compare these histories to those of European and other civilizations, considering Chinese and non-Chinese views of the past. Readings include the Analects of Confucius and other Confucian and Daoist texts, Buddhist tales and early modern fiction, selections from the classic Records of the Grand Historian (Shiji), and Jonathan Spence’s Emperor of China: Self-portrait of Kangxi. Two class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Dennerline.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

25 Japanese History to 1700

(Offered as History 17 [ASP] and Asian 25 [J].) This course surveys the history of the Japanese archipelago from pre-history to the early-1700s. We will examine critical themes in early Japanese history, including the rise of the Yamato court, influences from the Chinese continent and Korean peninsula, the aristocratic culture of the Heian court, the emergence of samurai rule, as well as the civil wars and cosmopolitanism of the sixteenth century.  We will conclude with the pacification of the realm under the Tokugawa shoguns in the seventeenth century and the rise of a vibrant urban culture in the early-eighteenth century. We will read eighth-century mythology, Heian court literature, chronicles of war, as well as religious and philosophical texts, asking how they refract the diverse experiences of early Japanese history. Classes will entail lectures coupled with close readings and discussion. Requirements include short response papers and topical essays. Three class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Maxey.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2009, Fall 2011

26 Middle Eastern History: 600-1800

(Offered as History 19 [MEP] and Asian 26 [WA].) This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the outset of the Islamic period to the beginning of the modern period. It is divided into the following segments: the formative period of Islam, the classical caliphates, the classical courts, the Mongols, and the great empires of the Ottomans and the Safavids. The course is organized chronologically and follows the making and breaking of empires and political centers; however, the focus of the course is on the intellectual, social, cultural and religious developments in these periods. Two class meetings per week.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

27 Fictions of Desire: The Demimonde in Japan

[J] This course explores the demimonde-the world of prostitutes, geisha, and hostesses-in Japan from the seventeenth century to the present. In Japan, in particular, the demimonde has been the focus of much artistic work that is revealing of larger social concerns. Besides being the central node of the sex trade, the demimonde also functions as a site where society explores the effects of desire on the social order, projects its fantasies about male/female relations, and turns certain types of female roles into symbols of “Woman” in general. The goals of this course are to learn how the demimonde arose, how it has been transformed over time, how women have been positioned within it, and how it interfaces with the wider social world. We will use narrative fiction, film, historical scholarship, autobiography, art, theatrical works, and anthropology so that we gain a nuanced and complete picture of this unique milieu. No prior knowledge of Japan or Japanese is required, and students in Asian studies, Women’s Studies, Cultural Studies, Comparative Literature, and other disciplines are welcome.

Limited to 20 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Van Compernolle.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007

28 The Dao of Sex: Sexuality in China, Past and Present

(Offered as Asian 28 [C] and Women’s and Gender Studies 05.) This survey course will focus on sexual culture in China, from pre-Qin times to the present. Using various sources such as ancient medical texts, Daoist manuals, court poetry and Confucian classics, paintings and illustrated books, movies and documentaries, as well as modern and pre-modern fiction written both in the classic and vernacular languages, we will explore notions of sex, sexuality, and desire. Through the lens of cultural history and gender studies, we will try to reconstruct the genealogy of the discourses centered around sex that developed in China, at all levels of society, throughout 5,000 years. Among the topics covered will be sexual yoga, prostitution, pornography, and sex-tourism.

Limited to 25 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2012

29 Fashion Matters: Clothes, Bodies and Consumption in East Asia

(Offered as Asian 29 and Women’s and Gender Studies 13.) This course will focus on both the historical and cultural development of fashion, clothing and consumption in East Asia, with a special focus on China and Japan. Using a variety of sources, from fiction to art, from legal codes to advertisements, we will study both actual garments created and worn in society throughout history, as well as the ways in which they inform the social characterization of class, ethnicity, nationality, and gender attributed to fashion. Among the topics we will analyze in this sense will be hairstyle, foot-binding and, in a deeper sense, bodily practices that inform most fashion-related discourses in East Asia. We will also think through the issue of fashion consumption as an often-contested site of modernity, especially in relationship to the issue of globalization and world-market. Thus we will also include a discussion of international fashion designers, along with analysis of phenomena such as sweatshops.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Professor Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2011

30 India in Film: Hollywood, Bollywood, Mollywood

[SA] A study of selected films from India, Europe, and the United States ranging from popular cinema (Dil Se, Om Shanti Om, Kal Ho Na Ho, Gunga Din, Gandhi, Passage to India) to art cinema (Satyajit Ray’s Apu Trilogy, Charulata, Salaam Bombay, Water). In which ways are the themes, characters, plot, structures and techniques of the films culturally specific? Using Edward Said’s book Orientalism as a starting point, this course will explore how Western films deal with the exotic and, conversely, how Indian films present the idea of Self and reaffirm (or contradict) the ideals and values of Indian society.

Limited to 30 students. Spring semester. Professor Emeritus Reck.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010

31 Asian Studies Colloquium: 2010 - Imagining Boundaries

A close study of a focused topic that has broad significance in Asian Studies. Normally to be team-taught by two faculty of the department. The approach will be multidisciplinary; the goal of the course will be to explore a subject of interest in Asian Studies that also has suggestive implications for issues in the humanities and social sciences.

The human mind seems infinitely creative in its effort to imagine boundaries between peoples.  Human society seems just as infinitely creative in constructing barriers and breaking them down.  Ancient Chinese rulers built walls to define the boundary between the states they imagined to be civilized and the nomads that threatened them.  Modern European and American diplomats have drawn borders across the Middle East to distinguish what they imagine to be coherent nations in an international community of nations.  Great religions and lesser sects, nomads, sojourners, and musicians have crossed these boundaries and drawn alternative ones around themselves, sometimes challenging and sometimes reinforcing political divisions already in place.  Beginning with current events and reaching into the past, we will examine a variety of cases--political, religious, and cultural--in which imagining boundaries and crossing lines have enhanced or reduced major conflicts.  Student input will play a major role in determining the content.  Possible areas of inquiry include Iraq, Iran, Kashmir, Tibet, Islam in Southeast Asia, Buddhist international relief efforts, the Taiwan problem, and historical influences such as the Mongol expansion, religious pilgrimage, piracy, and Pan-Asianism in Japan.

Limited to 30 students. Spring semester. Professors Dennerline and Ringer.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011

33 Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature

[J] This course is an introduction to modern and contemporary Japanese literature through readings and discussions of short stories, novels, drama, and poetry from mainland Japan and Okinawa. The course deals with both literary and cultural issues from around 1800 to the present day, with particular emphasis placed on how literature has reflected and responded to the vertiginous transformations undergone by Japan in the last two centuries: the rise of a commercial economy, the encounter with the West, rapid modernization and the emergence of consumer culture, imperial expansion, war, defeat, democratization, and finally vaulting back onto the world stage as a postmodern economic superpower. This course assumes no prior knowledge of Japan or Japanese, and all texts are taught using English translations.

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Van Compernolle.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2013

34 Japan on Screen

[J] Is the concept of national cinema useful in the age of globalization?  Given the international nature of cinema at its inception, was it ever a valid concept?  In this course, we will consider how the nation is represented on screen as we survey the history of film culture in Japan, from the very first film footage shot in the country in 1897, through the golden age of studio cinema in the 1950s, to important independent filmmakers working today. While testing different theories of national, local, and world cinema, we will investigate the Japanese film as a narrative art, as a formal construct, and as a participant in larger aesthetic and social contexts.  This course includes the major genres of Japanese film and influential schools and movements.  Students will also learn and get extensive practice using the vocabulary of the discipline of film studies.  This course assumes no prior knowledge of Japan or Japanese, and all films have English subtitles.

Limited to 20 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Van Compernolle.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

36 A History of Love: Chinese Romance in Time

(Offered as Asia 36 [C] and Women’s and Gender Studies 30.) The course will deal with the world of romance in traditional Chinese culture. Following the thematic arrangement found in the seventeenth-century text Qingshi, A History of Love, an encyclopedic work about the various forms love can take, we will read and analyze stories, novels, poetry and plays (in their English translation) from different historical periods. Our aim shall be to try and draw together all of the discourses circulating about the experience of passion, love and lust from the Tang dynasty up until the early twentieth century. If time allows, we will engage in comparisons with other East Asian traditions as well as with the Western traditions of romance, with the goal to generate meaningful cross-cultural exchanges.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008

37 Muhammad

This course deals with the life of Muhammad, the founder and prophet of Islam. The first part of the course deals with the life of Muhammad as reflected in the writings of the early Muslim biographers and historians. It examines the crucial events of Muhammad's life (the beginning of revelation, the night journey, the emigration to Medina, and military campaigns) and focuses on the image of Muhammad in the eyes of the early Muslim community. The second part deals with the veneration of Muhammad in Muslim piety, and the representations of Muhammad in the arts (visual art, music, and literature).

Spring semester. Professor Jaffer.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2013

38 From Edo to Tokyo: Japanese Art from 1600 to the Present

(Offered as Art 62 and Asian 38 [J].)  In 1590 the Tokugawa family founded its provincial headquarters in eastern Japan. By the eighteenth century, this castle town, named Edo (now known as Tokyo), had become the world’s largest city. This class will focus on the appearance of artistic traditions in the new urban center and compare them with concurrent developments in the old capital of Kyoto. Topics of discussion will include the revival of classical imagery during the seventeenth century, the rise of an urban bourgeois culture during the eighteenth century, the conflicts brought on by the opening of Japan to the West in the nineteenth century, the reconstruction of Tokyo and its artistic practices after the Second World War, and impact of Japanese architecture, design and popular culture over the past twenty years.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Morse.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2011, Spring 2014

39 Asia Pop!

How do globalization and post-modernity alter how we must think of cultural production?  How do we grasp the seeming contradiction between the movement of people, images, and technologies without regard for national borders, on the one hand, and the increasing fragmentation of the world into enclaves of difference?  As a way to frame such issues, this course will examine popular culture in China and Japan.  Paying due attention to the local meaning of popular culture and to its export to and reception in other countries, we will study such varied forms as kung fu films, anime, television, manga, toys, music, fashion, sports, and mass-produced art, in order to grapple with topics such as the transnational flow of cultural products, the cultural coding of commodities, gender construction, the otaku phenomenon, the commodification of political icons, the impact of technology on subjectivity and the body, and millennial visions of utopia and dystopia.

Limited to 20 students.  Spring semester.  Professors Van Compernolle and Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2010

40 Flowers in the Mirror:  Writing Women in Chinese Literature

(Offered as Asian 40 [C] and Womens' and Gender Studies 40.) The focus of this course will be texts written by women throughout the course of Chinese history. We will deal with a wide range of sources, from poetry to drama, from novels and short stories to nüshu (the secret script invented by peasant women in a remote area of Hunan province), from autobiographies to cinematic discourse. We will address the issue of women as others represent them and women as they portray themselves in terms of gender, sexuality, social class, power, family, and material culture. We will try to detect the presence and absence of female voices in the literature of different historical periods and to understand how those literary works relate to male-authored literary works. In addition to primary sources, we will integrate theoretical work in the field of pre-modern, modern and contemporary Chinese literature and culture.

Fall semester.  Professor Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Fall 2012

41 Anthropology and the Middle East

(Offered as Anthropology 31 and Asian 41 [WA].)  In an era where “terrorism” has eclipsed the nuclear fears of the Cold War and become associated with a radicalism that is portrayed as at once militant, anti-Western, and bound to a particular region (the Middle East) and religion (Islam), the task of this seminar--to examine the everyday realities of people living throughout the Middle East--has become all the more critical.  Beginning with an historical eye toward the ways that the “West” has discovered, translated, and written about the “Orient,” this seminar will use anthropological readings, documentary film, and literary accounts to consider a range of perspectives on the region commonly referred to as the Middle East.  Rather than attempting a survey of the entire region, the course will take a thematic approach and explore such topics as:  Islam and secularism, colonialism and postcoloniality, gender and political mobilization, media and globalization, and the politics and ethics of nation building.  As an anthropology course, the class will take up these themes through richly contextualized accounts of life within the region.  While it is recognized that the Middle East is incredibly heterogeneous, particular attention will given to the influence and role of Islam.  By the end of the seminar, students will have gained a broad understanding of some of the most pressing issues faced within the area, while at the same time grappling with advanced theoretical readings.  No previous knowledge of the Middle East is assumed.

Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor C. Dole.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

45 Japan as Empire, 1895-1945

(Offered as History 55 [AS] and Asian 45 [J].)  As Japan pursues a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council today, its past as a multi-ethnic empire looms large in East Asia. Japan acquired its first colonial territory following the Sino-Japanese War of 1895, and until its defeat in 1945 the acquisition and administration of a colonial empire shaped Japanese life at all levels. Post-1945 history has tended to sequester the experience of empire as an aberration that belonged only to the domain of international relations. Challenging such a view, this course asks how imperialism was intimately related to Japan’s modern politics, economic development, and cultural production. We will first consider the origin and acquisition of an empire, then examine how securing and administering that empire produced its own logic for expansion. Throughout, we will ask how a colonial-empire, with its complex identity politics, shaped the Japanese experience. Course materials will include literature and film, as well as scholarship and primary documents. Two class meetings per week.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Maxey.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007

46 Modern China

(Offered as History 16 [AS] and Asian 46 [C].) A survey of Chinese history from the Manchu conquest of 1644 to the present. Beginning with the successes and failures of the imperial state as it faced global economic development, expanding European empires, and internal social change, we will study the Opium War, massive nineteenth-century religious rebellions, Republican revolution and state-building, the “New Culture” movement, Communist revolution, the anti-Japanese war, Mao’s Cultural Revolution, and the problems of post-Mao reform, all with comparative reference to current events. Readings, which include a wide variety of documents such as religious and revolutionary tracts, eye-witness accounts, memoirs, and letters, are supplemented by interpretive essays and videos. Two class meetings per week.

Spring semester. Professor Dennerline.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2015

47 Modern Japanese History from 1800 to the 2000s

(Offered as History 18 [AS] and Asian 47 [J].) This course surveys the modern history of the Japanese archipelago, from the late-Tokugawa period through the rise of the modern Meiji nation-state, colonial expansion and total war. We will conclude with the postwar economic recovery and the socio-political challenges facing the Japanese nation-state in the early-2000s. Through primary documents, fiction, and film, we will explore themes including the disestablishment of the samurai class, industrialization, imperialism, feminism, nationalism, war, democracy, and consumerism. Classes will consist of lectures along with close readings and discussions. Requirements include short response papers and topical essays. Three class meetings per week.

Spring semester. Professor Maxey.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

48 The Modern Middle East: 1800-Present

(Offered as History 20 [ME] and Asian 48 [WA].) This course surveys the history of the Middle East from 1800 to the present. The focus is on the political, social and intellectual trends involved in the process of modernization and reform in the Middle East. General topics include the Ottoman Empire and its “decline,” the impact of European imperialism and colonialism, programs of modernization and reform, the construction of nationalism and national identities, Islamism, development and contemporary approaches to modernity. This class is writing intensive. Two class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2011, Spring 2013

49 China in the World, 1895-1919

(Offered as History  57 [AS] and Asian 49 [C].)  In 1895 the emergent Japanese empire imposed a humiliating defeat on the declining Qing empire in China, began the colonization of Korea and Taiwan, and set in motion the reformist and revolutionary trends that would shape the political culture of the Chinese nation in later times. In 1919, concessions by the Chinese warlord regime in Beijing to Japan at Versailles sparked the student movement that would further radicalize the political culture and ultimately divide the nation politically between Nationalist and Communist regimes. This course focuses on the intellectual, cultural, political, and economic issues of the era in between, when, despite the weakness of the state, the creative visions and efforts of all informed people were in line with those of progressives throughout the world. We will explore these visions and efforts, with special reference to national identities, civil society, and global integration, and we will consider their fate in wartime, Cold War, and post-Cold War Asia. Two class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Dennerline.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

50 Religion, Society, and Politics in Greater China

(Offered as History 58 [AS] and Asian 50 [C].) This course will introduce the student to Chinese religions, but the focus is less on religious doctrine or sacred texts than on religious beliefs, related social practices, and politics in Chinese communities past and present. We will read, think, talk, and write about ancient and modern Chinese world views, the development and interactions among the main religious traditions in China over time, local cults, family rituals, spirit possession, popular culture, Christianity, Maoism, and new religions in social and political context. We will engage in theoretical and interpretive discussions about these subjects with the help of historians, anthropologists, religious scholars, and political theorists. The course title refers to “Greater China” because our subject will not be limited to the Chinese mainland but will include Chinese and culturally mixed communities in Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and the U.S. as well. Two class meetings per week.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Dennerline.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008

55 Early Islam: Construction of an Historical Tradition

(Offered as History 60 [MEP] and Asian 55 [WA].)  This course examines in depth the formative period of Islam between c. 500-680. Using predominantly primary material, we will chart the emergence, success, and evolution of Islam, the Islamic community, and the Islamic polity. The focus of this course is on understanding the changing nature over time of peoples’ understanding of and conception of what Islam was and what Islam implied socially, religiously, culturally and politically. We concentrate on exploring the growth of the historical tradition of Islam and its continued contestations amongst scholars today. This course will familiarize students with the events, persons, ideas, texts and historical debates concerning this period. It is not a course on the religion or beliefs of Islam, but a historical deconstruction and analysis of the period. This class is writing intensive. Two class meetings per week.

Admission with consent of the instructor. Not open to first-year students. Limited to 15 students. Omitted 2009-10.  Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Spring 2013

56 The Islamic Mystical Tradition

(Offered as Religion 53 and Asian 56)  This course is a survey of the large complex of Islamic intellectual and social perspectives subsumed under the term Sufism. Sufi mystical philosophies, liturgical practices, and social organizations have been a major part of the Islamic tradition in all historical periods, and Sufism has also served as a primary creative force behind Islamic aesthetic expression in poetry, music, and the visual arts. In this course, we will attempt to understand the various significations of Sufism by addressing both the world of ideas and socio-cultural practices. The course is divided into four modules: central themes and concepts going back to the earliest individuals who identified themselves as Sufis; the lives and works of two medieval Sufis; Sufi cosmology and metaphysics; Sufism as a global and multifarious trend in the modern world.

Spring semester. Professor Jaffer.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

58 Buddhist Ethics

(Offered as Religion 27 and Asian 58.) A systematic exploration of the place of ethics and moral reasoning in Buddhist thought and practice. The scope of the course is wide, with examples drawn from the whole Buddhist world, but emphasis is on the particularity of different Buddhist visions of the ideal human life. Attention is given to the problems of the proper description of Buddhist ethics in a comparative perspective.

Spring semester. Professor Heim.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2012

60 Religion and Society in the South Asian World

(Offered as Anthropology 34 and Asian 60 [SA].) Observers have long marveled at the sheer number of separate religious traditions that flourish and interact with each other in South Asia. In this single ethnographic region, the Indian subcontinent, we find Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Christians, Jews, and others as well. Given this extraordinary diversity, South Asia provides an unparalleled opportunity to study interactions among religious systems in a broad range of social and political contexts. This course takes advantage of this circumstance by exploring, in South Asian settings, a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of religion. Among the subjects to be considered are religion and social hierarchy, religion and gender, religious responses to rapid social change, modern religious movements, religion and modern media, religious nationalism, and South Asian religions in diaspora. Although the course focuses on the South Asian region, it is designed to emphasize theoretical issues of current interest to anthropologists and others who study religion from the perspective of social science. While some background in South Asian studies would be helpful, it is not a prerequisite for this course.

Limited to 15 students. Spring semester. Professor Babb.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2010

61 Sacred Images and Sacred Space: The Visual Culture of Religion in Japan

(Offered as Art 66 and Asian 61.) An interdisciplinary study of the visual culture of the Buddhist and Shinto religious traditions in Japan. The class will examine in depth a number of Japan's most important sacred places, including Ise Shrine, Tôdaiji, Daitokuji and Mount Fuji, and will also look at the way contemporary architects such as Andô Tadao and Takamatsu Shin have attempted to create new sacred places in Japan today. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways by which the Japanese have given distinctive form to their religious beliefs through architecture, painting and sculpture, and the ways these objects have been used in religious ritual.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Morse.

2014-15: Not offered

62 The History and Memory of the Asia-Pacific War

(Offered as History 90 [AS] and Asian 62 [J].)  The varied names given to the fifteen years of war conducted by Japan-the Pacific War, the Great East Asian War, the Fifteen-Year War, World War II, and the Asian-Pacific War-suggest a number of conflicting perspectives arise from that war. How has the experience of a fifteen-year war during the 1930s and 1940s shaped memory and history in Japan, East Asia, and the United States? This seminar begins with this broad question and pursues related questions: How are the memory and history of war intertwined in both national and international politics? What forms of memory have been included and excluded from dominant historical narratives and commemorative devices? How does critical historiography intersect with the politics and passions of memory? We will use oral histories, primary documents, film, and scholarship to guide our thoughts and discussions. We will begin with a history of Japan’s Fifteen-Year War and move on to prominent debates concerning the history and memory of that war. A reading response journal, short response papers, and a research paper will be required. Students will also serve as discussion initiators. One class meeting per week.

Limited to 15 students. Not open to first-year students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Maxey.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2010, Fall 2015

63 Women in the Middle East

(Offered as History 62 [ME], Asian 63 [WA], and Women’s and Gender Studies 62.) The course examines the major developments, themes and issues in women’s history in the Middle East. The first segment of the course concerns the early Islamic period and discusses the impact of the Quran on the status of women, the development of Islamic religious traditions and Islamic law. Questions concerning the historiography of this “formative” period of Islamic history, as well as hermeneutics of the Quran will be the focus of this segment. The second segment of the course concerns the 19th- and 20th-century Middle East. We will investigate the emergence and development of the “woman question,” the role of gender in the construction of Middle Eastern nationalisms, women’s political participation, and the debates concerning the connections between women, gender, and religious and cultural traditions. The third segment of the course concerns the contemporary Middle East, and investigates new developments and emerging trends of women’s political, social and religious activism in different countries. The course will provide a familiarity with the major primary texts concerning women and the study of women in the Middle East, as well as with the debates concerning the interpretation of texts, law, religion, and history in the shaping of women’s status and concerns in the Middle East today. This class is conducted as a seminar. Two class meetings per week.

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2011

64 Seminar on Middle Eastern History: Modern Turkey--Modern Iran: From Authoritarian Modernization to Islamic Resistance

(Offered as History 93 [ME] and Asian 64 [WA].)  In the early twentieth century Turkey and Iran seemed to be on similar trajectories towards modernization. Turkey and Iran today, however, evidence very different societies, political systems, and relationships to religion and the West. This course will examine the programs of the authoritarian modernizers of the twentieth century in historical context and seek to illuminate the basis of their very different political, cultural and social legacies. Why does Turkey follow a secularism that is intolerant of sartorial freedoms and cultural and religious minorities? Why, in such a secular state, is Turkey experiencing a rise of Islamist movements? Conversely, why does Iran follow an Islamic government that is likewise intolerant of sartorial freedoms and religious minorities? Both claim to be democratic; how and why are these claims validated? What are the roots of their visions of the modern world and where are these societies headed? One class meeting per week.

Preference given to students who have taken at least one course regarding the Middle East.  Limited to 20 students. Not open to first-year students. Fall semester. Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2009

65 Middle Eastern Court Culture

(Offered as History 94 [ME] and Asian 65 [WA].)  Middle Eastern court culture--the culture of the royal courts of both pre-Islamic and Islamic kings and royalty--has long been esteemed as an inspiration of visual arts, heroic epics, and poetry. Court culture is also widespread, forming an important shared element in Persian, Arab and Turkish dynasties throughout the centuries. What has been insufficiently appreciated, however, is court culture’s rich contribution to political theory, ethics and the role of women in society. This seminar will illuminate these contributions from the pre-Islamic, classical and early modern Middle Eastern court cultures, using both visual arts and texts. The emphasis will be on exploring both their complementarities and tensions with “Islamic” culture as together they form the principle pillars of arts, ethics and political theory in the Middle East. One class meeting per week.

Admission with consent of the instructor. Limited to 15 students. Not open to first-year students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Ringer.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009

66 The Monkey, the Outlaws, and the Stone: The Novel in Pre-modern China

[C] This course will be devoted to reading the English translations of the major Chinese novels, from the Ming dynasty Xiyouji (Journey to the West), to the Jin Ping Mei (The Plum in the Golden Vase), the Shui hu zhuan (The Water Margins), to the eighteenth-century novel Hongloumeng (The Dream of the Red Chamber). Due to the length of each individual text, only one major novel will be the focus of the course each time, though we will often include selections from other contemporary and related sources, when relevant to the overall understanding of the text under study. As we read through the novel selected for the semester together, uncovering its richness and complexity, we will in turn address issues such as the place of the novel in traditional Chinese literature; authorship and authority; narrative strategies and plot development; magic and religion; material culture and fashion; class and discrimination; health and disease; femininity, masculinity and their discontents. In addition to the primary source chosen for each semester, representative theoretical work in the field of pre-modern Chinese literature will be incorporated as much as possible.

Spring semester. Professor Zamperini.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2013

69 Theravada Buddhism

(Offered as Religion 26 and Asian 69 [SA].) This course introduces the history and civilization of Theravada Buddhism. The Theravada (the “Doctrine of the Elders”) is the dominant form of Buddhism in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (Burma); in recent decades it has also found a following in other regions in Asia and the west. We will trace the Theravada’s origins as one of the earliest sectarian movements in India to its success and prestige as a religious civilization bridging South and Southeast Asia. We will also consider this tradition’s encounter with modernity and its various adaptations and responses to challenges in the contemporary world. No previous background in Buddhism is required.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Heim.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2016

77, 78 Senior Departmental Honors

Fall semester. 

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

97, 98, 97H, 98H Special Topics

Independent Reading Course.

Fall semester. Members of the Department.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

Chinese

01 First-Year Chinese I

This course, along with Chinese 02 in the spring semester, is an elementary introduction to Mandarin Chinese offered for students who have no Chinese-speaking backgrounds. The class takes an integrated approach to basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and it emphasizes pronunciation and the tones, Chinese character handwriting, and the most basic structure and patterns of Chinese grammar. The class meets five times per week (lectures on MWF and drill sessions on TTh).

Limited to 30 students. Fall semester. Senior Lecturer Teng.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

02 First-Year Chinese II

A continuation of Chinese 01. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a good command of Mandarin pronunciation, the basic grammar structures, an active vocabulary of 700 Chinese characters, and basic reading and writing skills in the Chinese language. The class meets five times per week (lectures on MWF and drill sessions on TTh). This course prepares students for Chinese 05 (Second-year Chinese I).

Requisite: Chinese 01 or equivalent. Limited to 30 students. Spring semester. Senior Lecturer Teng.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

03 Heritage Chinese I

An intensive introductory course for heritage language learners who have near-native speaking ability in Chinese with very little or no knowledge in written Chinese. Building upon the students’ oral/aural abilities, this course aims to develop students’ communicative competence in all four skills, with special emphasis on reading and writing. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a good command of Mandarin pronunciation, part of the basic grammar structures, an active vocabulary of 600 Chinese characters, and basic reading and writing skills in the Chinese language. Three class hours are supplemented by two drill sessions.

Admission with consent of the instructor. Limited to 10 students. Omitted 2009-10. Senior Lecturer Li.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008

04 Heritage Chinese II

A continuation of Chinese 03, the second intensive introductory course for heritage language learners who have near-native speaking ability in Chinese but want to develop their reading and writing skills. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to master an active vocabulary of 1,200 Chinese characters, to have a good command of the basic grammar structures and idiomatic expressions, to conduct conversations and discussion with standard Mandarin pronunciation, and to comprehend and write short stories and essays on daily matters in modern Chinese. Three class hours are supplemented by two drill sessions. This course prepares students for Chinese 07 (Third-year Chinese I).

Requisite: Chinese 03 or equivalent. Instructor consent required. Limited to 10 students. Omitted 2009-10. Senior Lecturer Li.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009

05 Second-Year Chinese I

This course is designed for students who have completed first year Chinese classes. The emphasis will be on the basic grammatical structures. The course reinforces the four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through vigorous drills and practices. There will be three class meetings and two drill sessions each week.

Requisite: Chinese 02 or equivalent. Limited to 28 students, maximum enrollment of 4 students per section. Fall semester. Senior Lecturer Li.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

06 Second-Year Chinese II

This course is a continuation of Chinese 05. By the end of the semester, most of the basic grammatical structures will be addressed. This course continues to help students develop higher proficiency level on the four skills. Class will be conducted mostly in Chinese. There will be three meetings and two drill sessions each week. This course prepares students for Chinese 07.

Requisite: Chinese 05 or equivalent. Limited to 28 students, maximum enrollment of 4 students per section. Spring semester. Senior Lecturer Li.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

07 Third-Year Chinese I

This course is designed to expose students to more advanced and comprehensive knowledge of Mandarin Chinese, with an emphasis on both linguistic competence and communicative competence. Expanding of vocabulary and development of reading comprehension will be through different genres of authentic texts. Students will be trained to write short essays on a variety of topics. Three class hours are supplemented by two drill sessions.

Requisite: Chinese 04, 06 or equivalent. Fall semester. Senior Lecturer Shen.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

08 Third-Year Chinese II

A continuation of Chinese 07, a modern Chinese reading and writing course at the advanced level. Development of the basic four skills will continue to be stressed. It will emphasize both linguistic competence and communicative competence. Acquisition of additional characters will be through authentic readings of different genres. More training will be given on writing with more precision and details. Three class hours are supplemented by two drill sessions. This course prepares students for Chinese 09.

Requisite: Chinese 07 or equivalent. Spring semester. Senior Lecturer Shen.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

09 Fourth-Year Chinese I

This course is designed for students who have completed three years of Chinese at the college level. The emphasis is on building substantial sophisticated vocabulary and reading various genres of writings and literary works like newspaper articles, essays, and short novels, etc. Development of a higher level of proficiency of the four skills will be stressed through class discussions, writing compositions, listening to TV news clips and watching movies that are supplemental to the themes of the reading materials. Class will be conducted entirely in Chinese. There will be two class meetings each week.

Requisite: Chinese 08 or equivalent. Admission with the consent of the instructor. Fall semester. Senior Lecturer Shen.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015

10 Fourth-Year Chinese II

This course is a continuation of Chinese 09. More advanced authentic texts of different genres of writings and literary works will be introduced to students. Development of a higher level of proficiency of the four skills will be stressed through class discussions, writing compositions, listening to TV news clips and watching movies that are supplemental to the themes of the reading materials. Class will be conducted entirely in Chinese. There will be two class meetings each week.

Requisite: Chinese 09 or equivalent. Admission with consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Senior Lecturer Shen.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

Japanese

01 Introduction to the Japanese Language

This course is designed for students who have never previously studied Japanese. The course will introduce the overall structure of Japanese, basic vocabulary, the two syllabaries of the phonetic system, and some characters (Kanji). The course will also introduce the notion of “cultural appropriateness for expressions,” and will provide practice and evaluations for all four necessary skills-speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Fall semester. Lecturer Kayama.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

01H Introduction to the Japanese Language I

This half course is the first-semester of a non-intensive version of Japanese 01, which is offered regularly in the fall semester. This course is designed for interested students to begin their Japanese study in the spring semester in a non-intensive way. The course content is exactly the same as Japanese 01, but this course in the spring semester covers the first half of a regular Japanese 01 course. The subsequent course, Japanese 02H in the fall semester, covers the second half of a regular Japanese 01 course. Upon completion of Japanese 02H in the fall, interested students are eligible to take a regular Japanese 02 in the spring semester, the next level after Japanese 01.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa and Assistant.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008

02 Building Survival Skills in Japanese

This course is a continuation of Japanese 01. The course will emphasize active learning by each student in the class by means of the materials in the course website and individualized or small group discussions with the instructor. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. By the end of this course, students are expected to be familiar with most basic Japanese structures, to have acquired a substantial vocabulary, and to have gained sufficient speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency levels, which will enable the students to survive using Japanese in Japan. As for literacy, a few hundred new characters (Kanji) will be added by reading and writing longer passages. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 01 or equivalent. Spring semester. Lecturer Kayama.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

02H Introduction to the Japanese Language II

This half course is a continuation of Japanese 01H offered in the spring semester and is the spring semester of a non-intensive version of Japanese 01, which is offered regularly in the fall semester. The course content is exactly the same as Japanese 01, but this course covers the second half of a regular Japanese 01 course. Upon completion of this course in the fall semester, interested students are eligible to take the regular Japanese 02 in the spring semester, the next level after Japanese 01.

Requisite: Japanese 01H or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008

03 Review and Progress in Japanese

This course is designed for students who have already begun studying Japanese in high school, other schools, or at home before coming to Amherst, but have not finished learning basic Japanese structures or acquired a substantial number of characters (Kanji). This course is also for individuals whose proficiency levels of the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) are uneven to a noticeable degree. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Some Japanese instruction in high school, home, or college. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa and the Department.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

04 Beyond Basic Japanese

This course is a continuation of Japanese 03. The course will emphasize active learning from each student in the class by the use of the materials on the course website and individual or small group discussions with the instructor. By the end of this course, students are expected to be able to use basic Japanese structures with a substantial vocabulary and to have attained post-elementary speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency levels. As for literacy, a few hundred new characters (Kanji) will be added by reading and writing longer passages. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 03 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa and the Department.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

05 Communicating in Sophisticated Japanese

This course is designed for students who have completed the acquisition of basic structures of Japanese and have learned a substantial number of characters (Kanji) and are comfortable using them spontaneously. The course will emphasize the development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) at a more complex, multi-paragraph level. For example, students will be trained to speak more spontaneously and with cultural appropriateness in given situations using concrete as well as abstract expressions on a sustained level of conversation. As for literacy, students will be given practice reading and writing using several hundred characters (Kanji). Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 02 or 04, or equivalent. Fall semester. Senior Lecturer Miyama.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

06 Experience with Authentic Japanese Materials

This course is a continuation of Japanese 05. The course will provide sufficient practice of reading authentic texts and viewing films to prepare for the next level, Japanese 11, in which various genres of reading and films will be introduced. Throughout the course, the development of more fluent speech and stronger literacy will be emphasized by studying more complex and idiomatic expressions. Acquisition of an additional few hundred characters (Kanji) will be part of the course. The class will be conducted mostly in Japanese. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 05 or equivalent. Spring semester. Senior Lecturer Miyama.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

09H Conquering Kanji I

Japanese uses three different writing systems, one of which is called Kanji, with characters that were borrowed from China. A linguist, R.A. Miller (1986) in his book Nihongo (Japanese), writes: “The Japanese writing system is, without question, the most complicated and involved system of script employed today by any nation on earth; it is also one of the most complex orthographies ever employed by any culture anywhere at any time in human history.” The difficulty lies not merely in the number of characters that students must learn (roughly a couple of thousand), but also in the unpredictable nature of the ways these characters are used in Japanese. It is not possible in regular Japanese language classes to spend very much time on the writing system because the students must learn other aspects of the language in a limited number of class hours. This writing system is, however, not impossible to learn. In this half course, the students will learn the Japanese writing system historically and metacognitively, in group as well as individual sessions, and aim to overcome preconceived notions of difficulty related to the learning of Kanji. Each student in this class is expected to master roughly 500 Kanji that are used in different contexts.

Requisite: Japanese 01 at Amherst College or its equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

10H Conquering Kanji II

This half course serves either as continuation of Japanese 09H or the equivalent of 09H. See Japanese 09H for the course content.

Requisite: Japanese 01 at Amherst College or its equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Tawa.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

11 Introduction to Different Genres of Japanese Writing and Film

This course will introduce different genres of writing: short novels, essays, newspaper and magazine articles, poems, expository prose, scientific writings, and others. Various genres of films will also be introduced. Development of higher speaking and writing proficiency levels will be focused upon as well. The class will be conducted entirely in Japanese. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 06 or equivalent. Fall semester.  Senior Lecturer Miyama.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

12 Moving From "Learning to Read" to "Reading to Learn" in Japanese

This course will be a continuation of Japanese 11. Various genres of writing and film, of longer and increased difficulty levels, will be used to develop a high proficiency level of reading, writing, speaking, and listening throughout the semester. At this level, the students should gradually be moving from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” This important progression will be guided carefully by the instructor. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 11 or equivalent. Spring semester.  Senior Lecturer Miyama.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

13 Introduction to Thematic Reading and Writing

This course is designed for the advanced students of Japanese who are interested in readings and writings on topics that are relevant to their interests. Each student will learn how to search for the relevant material, read it, and summarize it in writing in a technical manner. The course will also focus on the development of a high level of speaking proficiency. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 12 or equivalent. Fall semester. Five College Lecturer Brown and Visiting Professor Yamamoto.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

14 Thematic Reading and Writing

This course is a continuation of Japanese 13. In addition to learning how to search for the relevant material, read it with comprehension, and produce a high level of writing, the students will learn to conduct a small research project in this semester. The course will also focus on the development of a high level of speaking proficiency through discussions with classmates and the instructor. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 13 or equivalent. Spring semester. Five College Lecturer Brown and Visiting Professor Yamamoto.

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

15 Introduction to Great Books and Films in the Original

This course is designed for students who possess a high proficiency level of speaking but need training in cover-to-cover book reading or film comprehension. Class materials will be selected from well-known books and films. Writing assignments will be given to develop critical and creative writing skills in Japanese. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 14 or equivalent. Fall semester.  Visiting Professor Yamamoto.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

16 Great Books and Films in the Original

This course is a continuation of Japanese 15. The course is designed for students who possess a high proficiency level of speaking but need training in cover-to-cover reading or film comprehension. Class materials will be selected from well-known books and films. Writing assignments will be given to develop critical and creative writing skills in Japanese. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Two group meetings and two individualized or small group evaluations per week are normally required throughout the semester.

Requisite: Japanese 15 or equivalent. Spring semester. Visiting Associate Professor Yamamoto. 

2014-15: Offered in Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2016
 

Yushien Garden