Chemistry Seminar Schedule

Chemistry seminars begin at 3:30PM on Friday afternoons in Science Center Room A011, and will be preceeded by refreshments at 3:15PM

Discussion seminars will also begin at 3:30PM on Friday afternoons; however, they will be held in Science Center Room A328.  Refreshments will also be served at 3:15PM

 

Fri, Jan 31, 2020

Fri, Feb 7, 2020

Cheminar - Chemistry Department Spring Poster/Information Session. An overview of Chemistry Department research.

Senior Chemistry Thesis Students, and other chemistry research students will present their research posters.

Chemistry Junior Majors - This will be a great opportunity to gather information if you are considering a chemistry thesis project. You will have a chance to mingle with your peers and discuss current thesis research with our honors students. Additionally, chemistry faculty will be available to discuss your interests in doing a thesis research project. We strongly encourage you to attend this seminar even if you aren’t yet sure you will be undertaking thesis work.

Fri, Feb 14, 2020

Cheminar - Student Talks

Nathaniel Corley, Alexandra Gomez, and Damani Travis will be presenting

Fri, Feb 21, 2020

Dr. Rory Waterman

Discussion Cheminar - Prepare for Professor Waterman's Seminar: 3/6/20

Seminar Title: “Phosphorus, Photons, and Metals: Increasingly Efficient ways to P–C Bonds.”
Abstract: An important challenge for chemists is increasingly efficient routes to element–carbon bonds, as characterized by energetic costs and atom economy, among other factors. An atom-economical route to metal-catalyzed element–carbon bond formation is the addition of an E–H bond across an unsaturated substrate, generally termed heterofunctionalization. For hydrophosphination or P–C bond formation, challenges in substrate scope, selectivity, and catalyst have loomed. Starting from poor initial hydrophosphination catalysis with zirconium compounds of the type (N3N)ZrX (N3N = N(CH2CH2NSiMe3)33–; X = anionic ligand), a family of earth abundant, highly active, and selective catalysts have been discovered and investigated. A reinvestigation of the zirconium catalysis has shown that, using primary phosphine substrates, alkenes and dienes are easily functionalized with high selectivity for either the secondary product (i.e., one P–H addition) or the tertiary product (i.e., two P–H additions). Surprising photolysis is a critical factor in activity for these catalysts. The arc of catalysis moves to iron chemistry that informs most recent discoveries in simple copper catalysts that may be the most active known.

Fri, Feb 28, 2020

Fri, Mar 6, 2020

Professor Waterman

Cheminar - Professor and Associate Dean Rory Waterman; The University of Vermont, Chemistry Department

Seminar Title: “Phosphorus, Photons, and Metals: Increasingly Efficient ways to P–C Bonds.”
Abstract: An important challenge for chemists is increasingly efficient routes to element–carbon bonds, as characterized by energetic costs and atom economy, among other factors. An atom-economical route to metal-catalyzed element–carbon bond formation is the addition of an E–H bond across an unsaturated substrate, generally termed heterofunctionalization. For hydrophosphination or P–C bond formation, challenges in substrate scope, selectivity, and catalyst have loomed. Starting from poor initial hydrophosphination catalysis with zirconium compounds of the type (N3N)ZrX (N3N = N(CH2CH2NSiMe3)33–; X = anionic ligand), a family of earth abundant, highly active, and selective catalysts have been discovered and investigated. A reinvestigation of the zirconium catalysis has shown that, using primary phosphine substrates, alkenes and dienes are easily functionalized with high selectivity for either the secondary product (i.e., one P–H addition) or the tertiary product (i.e., two P–H additions). Surprising photolysis is a critical factor in activity for these catalysts. The arc of catalysis moves to iron chemistry that informs most recent discoveries in simple copper catalysts that may be the most active known.

Fri, Mar 13, 2020

No Cheminar - Spring Break

Fri, Mar 20, 2020

No Cheminar - Spring Break

Fri, Mar 27, 2020

Pryde Lecturer: Dr. Evelyn Auyeung '09; Associate Research Scientist at The Dow Chemical Company

Dr. Auyeung was one of 30 young scientists highlighted at the "2013 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: 30 under 30: Probing Structures at the Nanoscale." https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/2013-lindau-evelyn-auyeung/

Fri, Apr 3, 2020