CLASSICS LECTURES IN THE VALLEY~ 

                      OPEN TO THE PUBLIC * 

*Except for select events noted


Links to campus maps:

Amherst College Smith College
Hampshire College UMass Amherst         
Mount Holyoke College  

2019 - 2020  


Cancelled.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26             7:00 PM

The Frank and Lois Green Schwoerer '49, Annual History Lecture

Guilt and Enslavement Habits of Thought from the Ancient World to Modern America

Noel Lenski, Yale University

This lecture will examine the mental connection between notions of guild and justifications for slavery. From Noah's "curse of Ham," to the mals usos of medieval Spain, to vani marriages in South Asia, to convict leasing in 20th-century America, the attribution of guilt has been used to lock people into bondage across time and space globally. We will explore the consequences of this mental slide continuing right up to contemporary America's carceral state.
 
Professor Noel Lenski, a historian of the Roman Empire in late antiquity, has produced important studies - such as Failure of Empire: Valens and the Roman State in the Fourth Century A.D. and Constantine and the Cities - that highlight the roles of emperors and responses to their autocratic power. He has also focused on slavery in, e.g., "Violence and the Roman Slave" (2016) and "Peasant and Slave in Late Antique North Africa, c. 100-600 CE" (2017).
 

SMITH COLLEGE, FORD HALL- RM. 240


Cancelled.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2                  5:30 PM

Reading Plautus with Frederick Douglass

Matthew Leigh, St. Anne's College, Oxford

DWIGHT 101, MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

Cancelled. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 4

The 30th Annual Phyllis Williams Lehmann Lecture

Brian Rose, University of Pennsylvania

SMITH COLLEGE


Cancelled.

THURSDAY, APRIL 9           5:00 PM

Rebecca Ammerman, Colgate University

AMHERST COLLEGE, BENESKI BUILDING- RM. 107 (Paino Lecture Hall)


 Cancelled.

THURSDAY, APRIL 16           5:00 PM

The Sixteenth Annual David F. Grose Memorial Lecture

Kalamianos: The Brief but Brilliant Life of a Mycenaean Harbor

Thomas F. Tartaron, University of Pennsylvania

UMASS AMHERST, HERTER HALL #227


Cancelled.

THURSDAY, APRIL 23        Time TBA

Lisa Nevett, University of Michigan


  EARLIER LECTURES


Cancelled.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12              5:00 PM

The Ancient Studies Annual Lecture at Smith College

Fictions of Citizenship in Livy's History of Rome

Denis Feeney, Princeton University

SMITH COLLEGE, SEELYE 201


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4               5:00 PM

Space, Scale, and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture

Reviel Netz, Stanford University

UMASS AMHERST, HERTER HALL- #301


THURSDAY, MARCH 5                  5:00 PM

Archaeological Institute of America- Western Mass Society presents

Where Did the Pompeians Go? Searching for Refugees from the Eruption of Vesuvius, AD 79

Steven Tuck, Miami University

AMHERST COLLEGE, BENESKI BUILDING- RM. #107 (Paino lecture hall)


MONDAY, MARCH 2                      4:00 - 6:00 PM                       Agosti and Oswald on Greek Epigraphy

Poetry on Stone: Reading Late Antique Metrical Inscriptions

Gianfranco AgostiUniversità di Roma "La Sapienza"

Professor Agosti is one of the foremost authorities on late antique Greek philology, especially the language of Greek epigraphic poetry. A prolific and imaginative scholar, he comes to us from the largest department of Classical Philology in world, the Università di Roma "La Sapienza." He will continue from here to give talks at Yale, Princeton, and Brown.

The Origin of Victory Epigrams

Simon Oswald, UMass Amherst

 

Both will look at the language, layout, and modes of reading Greek poetry on stone from the classical period to late antiquity.

UMASS, HERTER HALL, RM. 601


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27          5:00 PM

THE FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY SEMINAR IN CLASSICS*

Parce, Pater: Martial's "Augustan" Commentary on Domitianic Rome           in Ep. 5.7

A work in progress by Virginia M. Closs, UMass, Amherst

UMASS, HERTER HALL, RM. 301

All 5-C faculty are welcome.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20         5:30PM   

Cincinnatus at Home:  Urban 'Meadows' and the Topography of Ancient Rome

Nicole Brown, Williams College 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGEDWIGHT 101


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3                          5:30 PM

THE FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY SEMINAR IN CLASSICS* 

Fake News Thucydides, Sad!

A first look at a work in progress by

Simon Oswald, UMass Amherst

UMASS, ILC (INTEGRATED LEARNING CENTER) - N111

*All 5C faculty are welcome. 


NOVEMBER 21                                     5:00 - 6:30 PM

Race and Representation in the Roman Empire: Images of Africans between Myth, Stereotype, and Reality

Sinclair Bell, Northern Illinois University

UMASS, HERTER HALL, ROOM 301


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7                   5:00 PM 

Dreams in Greek and Roman Religion: The Evidence of Inscriptions

Gil Renberg, University of Michigan and Western MA AIA, LaFollette lecturer

UMASS AMHERST, HERTER HALL #301


 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8                        3:00 - 6:00 PM

UMass Classics Department Colloquium

Flavian (Re)Configurations: Civic Ideals and Urban Realities

UMASS, INTEGRATIVE LEARNING CENTER (ILC), S331

Additional details


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24                 5:00PM

Looking for Lyric Poetry in Homer's Iliad

Andrew Ford, Princeton University

SMITH COLLEGE, SEELYE #201


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31                    5:00 - 8:00PM

New England Ancient Historians Colloquium

Program and registration information

UMASS CAMPUS CENTER, 10TH FLOOR, AMHERST ROOM


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26              5:00 PM

From Spoils to Saviors: Re-valuing the First Roman Wives as Civic Actors in Livy's "From the Foundation of the City"

Meredith Safran, Trinity College

Many of Rome’s founding civic myths conjoin the community’s political transformation with sexualized violence against women. Since the “women in antiquity” movement took off in the 1980s, feminist scholars have sought to understand the role of such gendered violence in Roman culture and its implications for the reception of ancient Rome in the Western classical tradition, given how many societies continued to draw inspiration from Roman practices and ideas throughout modernity. This talk will focus on the episode traditionally known as “the rape of the Sabine women,” in which the first Romans staved off the extinction of their new community and established Rome’s version of marriage, but did so by obtaining their wives through a mass bride abduction. Unlike most of the women who fall victim to violence in Rome’s founding myths, the Sabine women not only survive their assault; by the end of their story, as told by the Roman historian Livy, they’ve won universal respect and recognition for saving both new and old communities, which they risk their own lives to defend. We’ll explore how such a triumph could result from a story that begins with assault and consider why these women’s remarkable rise in status is not how people tend to remember this story today.

Sponsored by the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series Fund at Amherst College and the Department of Classics.

AMHERST COLLEGE, BENESKI HALL, PAINO LECTURE HALL