Computer Science Talks and Events

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

David Kotz

Dartmouth College

Security and Privacy:  Mobile Medical Applications

Mobile medical applications offer tremendous opportunities to improve quality and access to care, reduce cost, and improve individual wellness and public health. These new technologies, whether in the form of software for smartphones as specialized devices to be worn, carried, or applied as needed, may also pose risks if they are not designed or configured with security and privacy in mind. For example, a patient's insulin pump may accept dosage instructions from unauthorized smartphones running a spoofed application; another patient's fertility-tracking app may be probing the Bluetooth network for its associated device, exposing her use of this app to nearby strangers. In this talk, Dr. David Kotz presents an overview of the security and privacy challenges posed by mobile medical applications, including important open issues that require further research. 

David Kotz is the Champion International Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Dartmouth College. He served as Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences for six years and as the Executive Director of the Institute for Security Technology Studies for four years. His research interests include security and privacy, pervasive computing for healthcare, and wireless networks. He is an IEEE Fellow, a Senior Member of the ACM, a 2008 Fulbright Fellow to India, and an elected member of Phi Beta Kappa. After receiving his A.B. in Computer Science and Physics from Dartmouth in 1986, he completed his Ph.D in Computer Science from Duke University in 1991 and returned to Dartmouth to join the faculty. For more information see http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~dfk/