Spring 2008

Russian and Soviet Film

Listed in: Russian, as RUSS-29

Faculty

Michael M. Kunichika (Section 01)

Description

Lenin declared "For us, cinema is the most important art," and the young Bolshevik regime threw its support behind a brilliant group of film pioneers (Eisenstein, Vertov, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Dovzhenko) who worked out the fundamentals of film language. Under Stalin, historical epics and musical comedies, not unlike those produced in 1930s Hollywood, became the favored genres. The innovative Soviet directors of the 1960s and 1970s (Tarkovsky, Parajanov, Abuladze, Muratova) moved away from politics and even narrative toward "film poetry." Post-Soviet Russian cinema has struggled to define a new identity, and may finally be succeeding. This course will introduce the student to the great Russian and Soviet film tradition. Frequent short writing assignments. Conducted in English. Two class meetings and one or two required screenings a week. Second semester. Visiting Professor Kunichika.

 

Taking Notes