Fall 2008

APOCALYPSE AND UTOPIA: GERMAN ARCHITECTURE, ART, AND DESIGN IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

Listed in: Art and the History of Art, as ARHA-91

Faculty

Karen R. Koehler (Section 03)

Description

Against a backdrop of revolution and war, spiritual questioning and utopian visions, industrialization and an emergent mass culture, nationalist tensions and the Holocaust, this class will examine German architecture, art and design from the turn of the twentieth century to the fall of the Berlin Wall. We will consider the architecture of figures such as Gropius, Mies, Behrens, and Taut in connection with the work of artists and designers such as Kirchner, Kandinsky, and Albers, as well as the films and photographs of artists such as Sandler, Richter, and Moholy-Nagy, The theoretical writings of Nietzsche, Kracauer, Benjamin, Adorno and others will be used as a critical lens, while we make use of exhibitions of German architecture, art and film at Amherst, Hampshire, and Smith Colleges. We will conclude with group presentations and independent papers covering works made after World War II. Advanced course. Requisite: One course in art history. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Koehler of Hampshire College.