ICC to trial DRC ex-vice-president

Submitted by Manuela Picq (inactive) on Tuesday, 10/19/2010, at 9:45 AM

The International Criminal Court (ICC) has agreed to pursue the war crimes trial of Jean-Pierre Bemba, Democratic Republic of Congo's ex-vice-president.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-11573604

Congolese rape victims march against sexual violence

Submitted by Jasmine Hardy on Monday, 10/18/2010, at 9:04 PM

Here is an article that gives sad proof that not enough is being done to prevent sexual violence against women.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/africa/10/17/congo.rapes.march/index.html?iref=allsearch

Mass Rapes in Congo Reveals U.N. Weakness

Submitted by Emmett D. Wynter on Friday, 10/15/2010, at 12:07 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/04/world/africa/04congo.html?ref=women

 

Rebels moved from house to house gang-raping at least 200 women as U.N. Peacekeepers were based up the road.

Women Warriors Must Feel Safe to Serve

Submitted by Chelsea G. Tejada on Thursday, 10/14/2010, at 9:19 PM

Article about rapes within armies, contrasting our discussion on rape as a war tactic.

 

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2010/10/12/matt-gurney-women-warriors-must-feel-safe-to-serve/ 

Brookings Report on Human Rights/UN

Submitted by Rachel L. Tuchman on Wednesday, 10/13/2010, at 3:33 PM

critical human rights challenge of this century is to ensure that the house functions effectively to shelter those individuals who need protection from discrimination, abuse and violence. To do this, we need to ask and answer a seemingly simple question: What works when it comes to international promotion and protection of human rights at the national level? This report seeks to answer that question as it relates to one piece of the United Nations human rights system:  the independent experts mandated by governments to report on how states respect human rights in fact, otherwise known as the “Special Procedures.”

 

http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2010/10_human_rights_piccone.aspx

World Economic Forum: The Global Gender Gap Report 2010

Submitted by Greg L. Genco on Wednesday, 10/13/2010, at 12:54 PM
The U.S. rose 12 places to finally land in the top 20 for gender equality. The climb reflects the higher number of women in leading roles in the current administration and improvements in the wage gap. The preface and pages 3-49 are of most importance. Interesting report to skim if you have a moment.

Test your movies... Bechdel Test

Submitted by Manuela Picq (inactive) on Wednesday, 10/13/2010, at 12:34 PM

This is to echo Marlene's post on gender in the media. Three little questions...

Bechdel Test: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLF6sAAMb4s&feature=player_embedded

Five new members voted to Security Council

Submitted by Razina Aziz-Bose on Tuesday, 10/12/2010, at 11:38 PM

This is a short article outlining the recent Security Council seat change. Now, Germany, India, South Africa, Colombia, and Portugal are are members of the UN SC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-11526592

Rwandan war criminal suspected arrested

Submitted by Amanda D. Barrow on Tuesday, 10/12/2010, at 10:02 PM

This article discusses a promising development in the international community's response to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. I figured it was particularly relevant to our discussion tomorrow on gendered war crimes--as the article notes, the DRC has experienced massive incidence of sexual violence.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/12/world/africa/12congo.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=sexual%20violence&st=cse

Slightly off topic, but the relative lack of international attention to the conflict in the Congo confounds me. A year ago, I read an Op-Ed piece in the NY Times that called the conflict and the continuing violence "The Invisible War," which speculated that the public hears so little about the crimes in the DRC because they are too profound, too widespread. I often hear this argument about the intractable civil wars in Africa--that outsiders can neither understand nor assist in the restoration of peace--but how does this theory grapple with the contradictory evidence of the similarly complicated, but media-covered, Darfur? In 2006, the Times gave Darfur nearly four times the coverage it gave the Congo, despite the fact that Congolese were dying from war-related causes at ten times the rate of individuals in Darfur. This statistic is reflected in other American media outlets. According to the Tyndall Report, an organization that monitors television news broadcasts on ABC, NBC, and CBS, in the past year there have been 16 major news reports on Rwanda and only one on Congo. So, what gives?

 

Where Having It All Doesn't Mean Having Equality

Submitted by Caroline C. Dreyspool on Tuesday, 10/12/2010, at 9:26 AM

Sorry the link didn't work before... hope it does now!

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Taking Notes