Submitted by Ronald Dean Bashford on Sunday, 9/5/2010, at 10:04 PM

Speaking is a way of breathing...

The Craft of Speaking is designed as a two half-course sequence in vocal technique for speaking on the stage and in any situation requiring presence and expressivity.  In the fall semester The Craft of Speaking I: Vocal Freedom focuses primarily on the physical aspects of vocal production through regular and progressive exercises related to relaxation, stretching, breathing, resonance, placement, presence and spontaneity. 

Toward the end of the semester, we will begin work in textual interpretation as a prelude for those who may want to continue work in the second semester with The Craft of Speaking II: Spoken Expression.

The course goals for this semester are:

  • To become familiar with the process of breathing, your own body, and your vocal habits and possibilities.
  • To expand your breathing capacity, and the range and color of your voice.
  • To enhance the spontaneous and expressive qualities of your speaking voice.
  • To learn how to become present to others while speaking and to encourage presence in others.
  • To learn to strengthen your articulatory muscles.
  • To learn beginning techniques to enhance clarity, effectiveness and self-expression in your speaking.

The course meets three times per week in order to make regular progress in physical technique.  Though there is some reading and related writing involved, this is a half-course focusing on physical technique, and outside homework is minimal.  The lion's share of essential work takes place in class, and so excellent attendance is mandatory.

Syllabus

If you are enrolled in THDA 32H, you can peruse or download the course syllabus here, or from the link on the left.

COURSE PETITION

If you are not yet registered for THDA 32H and you are considering taking this course, you may see all areas of this course page (including the syllabus) by requesting temporary access by using a course petition.

To petition THDA 32H, click here.

 

Taking Notes