Fall 2011

Race, Place, and the Law

Listed in: Black Studies, as BLST-147  |  Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, as LJST-105

Formerly listed as: BLST-71  |  LJST-05  |  LJST-33

Faculty

David P. Delaney (Section 01)

Description

(Offered as LJST 105 and BLST 147 [US].) Understandings of and conflicts about place are of central significance to the experience and history of race and race relations in America. The shaping and reshaping of places is an important ingredient in the constitution and revision of racial identities: think of “the ghetto,” Chinatown, or “Indian Country.” Law, in its various manifestations, has been intimately involved in the processes which have shaped geographies of race from the colonial period to the present day: legally mandated racial segregation was intended to impose and maintain both spatial and social distance between members of different races.

The objective of this course is to explore the complex intersections of race, place, and law. Our aim is to gain some understanding of geographies of race “on-the-ground” in real places, and of the role of legal practices--especially legal argument--in efforts to challenge and reinforce these racial geographies. We will ask, for example, how claims about responsibility, community, rationality, equality, justice, and democracy have been used to justify or resist both racial segregation and integration, access and expulsion. In short, we will ask how moral argument and legal discourse have contributed to the formation of the geographies of race that we all inhabit. Much of our attention will be given to a legal-geographic exploration of African-American experiences. But we will also look at how race, place and the law have shaped the distinctive experiences of Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans.

Fall semester. Limited to 40 students. Senior Lecturer Delaney.

Cost: $25.00 ?

Offerings

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2009, Fall 2011, Fall 2013
 

Taking Notes