Final take-home exam

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Tuesday, 5/1/2012, at 12:59 PM
  • Please submit your final take-home exam on GRADEBOOK
  • Please use the filename "Final_yourlastname.docx"
  • Write your name on the paper as well as the document.
  • Double-space, and use a 12-point font.

Due by 1 a.m. Saturday, May 12.

Please observe the honor code and do not discuss this essay with any friends or classmates. You *may* take the essay to the Writing Center, however.

Study guides for the final exam

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Tuesday, 5/1/2012, at 1:00 PM

List of abstracts

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Monday, 4/30/2012, at 5:21 PM

podcasts of the last few lectures

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Tuesday, 5/1/2012, at 4:24 PM

In case you want to hear some of the lectures over again (maybe you were snoozing? even absent?) here's a website for the recordings. You need to cut and paste the link and open on Safari as a browser (in my experience).

feed://xserver01.amherst.edu:8171/podcastproducer/atom_feeds/052D5F7E-0108-43E7-B4F5-76A1A71AC302

then, under "Recent Articles," to the right, click on "All";

then back up to click on "Apple TV."

You might want to listen with headphones, as it's a little echo-ey when I step away from the podium.

Second formal analysis

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Saturday, 4/21/2012, at 12:57 PM

Your second formal analysis on a work of art from around 1600 to 1800 that you looked at in a museum for this assignment, *in a different medium from your last one* and *not one we discussed in section*, is due 11:59 p.m. Sunday, April 29. This time please post it in GRADEBOOK. The filename should be Essay_2_yourlastname.docx.

Click on the links below for the 1) prompt, 2) general guidelines for a formal analysis and 3) for a rubric to let you know what I'll be looking for. Also, once you've written your first draft you might want to look at 4) the "7 commandments" to make sure you haven't made a major misjudgment about what features you've chosen to analyze.

Also I attach a list of works of art in the Mead that you might look at (remember, NOT the Renaissance ones), either on view or in storage.

Midterm take-home essay prompt

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Sunday, 3/11/2012, at 9:18 PM
  • Please call your document “Midterm” followed by your last name (i.e. Midterm_Jones.docx).
  • Write your name on the paper as well as the document.
  • Double-space, and use a 12-point font.
  • Upload it into GRADEBOOK, not Dropbox.

 Prompt
Please compare and contrast Masaccio’s Trinity (c. 1425) and Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks (Louvre version, c. 1482-3).  You can find images and basic information about them in ARTstor.

Click on the attached Word document to find suggestions on how to structure and write your paper.

 

midterm test examples

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Tuesday, 3/6/2012, at 4:51 PM

Here are the prompts for a past midterm, both in-class and take-home.

First formal analysis

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Thursday, 2/16/2012, at 7:35 AM

Your first formal analysis on a work of art from around 1400 to 1520 that you looked at in a museum for this assignment, is due 11:59 p.m. Friday, March 2. This time please post it in GRADEBOOK.

Click on the links below for the 1) prompt and list of museums with works of art, 2) general guidelines for a formal analysis and 3) for a rubric to let you know what I'll be looking for. Also, once you've written your first draft you might want to look at 4) the "7 commandments" to make sure you haven't made a major misjudgment about what features you've chosen to analyze.

Response 3

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Thursday, 2/9/2012, at 10:17 AM

RESPONSE due Monday, Feb. 13 at 6:00 p.m. in Dropbox

Please title your document "Response_3_yourlastname.docx"

* Analyze the composition of one of the works of art below.  Think of motion and stasis, balance, light, shade, mass, volume.  See what Vasari says.  Also see any glossary in art survey texts, or guides on writing about art, e.g. by Anne d’Alleva or by Sylvan Barnet [you can borrow copies from the library].

--Choose one of the following works:  Donatello’s Feast of Herod relief or Raphael’s Madonna of the Meadow.  You can find images on the database ARTStor accessible through AC (http://www.artstor.org/info/) .

2 paragraphs, typed, double-spaced  

Here’s one pared-down definition:  “composition” The way in which an artist organizes forms in an art work, either by placing shapes on a flat surface or arranging forms in space.

[from Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 11th ed. (New York et al.:  Harcourt College Publishers, 2001), p. 1151]

 

Abstract weeks 1-2

Submitted by Nicola M. Courtright on Sunday, 1/29/2012, at 12:45 PM

ABSTRACTS; post by 12 midnight Wednesday 2/1 in Dropbox (see tab to left).

Read *Baxandall, Painting and Experience in 15th-Century Italy (2nd ed., 1988), 29-56; and * Vasari, “Preface to the Third Part,” and

excerpt of “Life” of Leonardo, in Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors and Architects, ed. Philip Jacks (Westminster, MD: Random House, 2006), 221-231, and

A. Nagel and C. Wood, ch. 1: “Plural Temporality of the Work of Art,” and ch. 9: “Fashion in Painting,” in Anachronic Renaissance (NY: Zone Books, 2010) 7-19, 85-95, 369-72, 388-90

For the readings write individual abstracts, answering the questions below for each:

Answer the following questions in 1-2 sentences each.  Write each question preceding each answer:

1)    What was the author trying to demonstrate/prove/argue?

2)  What kind of evidence did s/he use?

3)    Why does the question matter?

3)    What do you see as the importance of the piece, or how did it change your understanding of the subject?

You can hand in your abstracts in a *single document* in the class Dropbox (tab to left). Please title the document Abstract 1 yourlastname (e.g. Abstract 1 Smitheree.docx).

 

Taking Notes