Fall 2012

European Migrations

Listed in: European Studies, as EUST-335  |  History, as HIST-335

Moodle site: Course (Guest Accessible)

Faculty

Ellen R. Boucher (Section 01)

Description

(Offered as HIST 335 [EU] and EUST 335).  By tracing the journeys of people into, across, and out of Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this course explores the role of migration in forging modern national, regional, and global identities. On one level, it analyzes the factors that have impelled groups of people to cross borders. On another, it examines how these migrations have changed the social landscape of Europe, serving both to forge and to challenge the divides of culture, religion, and nationhood. Topics will include: mass emigration and the rise of European imperialism; debates over “belonging” in the era of nation-building; the development of passports, visa restrictions, and quotas; the emergence of the categories of “refugee” and “asylum seeker”; forced migration and human trafficking; colonial and postcolonial immigration into Europe; and contestations over multiculturalism. Readings will relate to a variety of geographical locations, but with special emphasis on migration into and out of Britain, France, Germany, and their empires. Two class meetings per week.

Limited to 35 students.  Fall semester.  Professor Boucher.

Offerings

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2012