Fall 2013

Ancient Political Thought

Listed in: Political Science, as POSC-243

Formerly listed as: POSC-43

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Andrew L. Poe (Section 01)

Description

[PT] This course surveys ancient Greek and Roman political thought. The course aims to illustrate that, although the ancient Western world was remarkably different from our own, many of the concepts and ideas that dominate our thinking about politics today have been influenced by our inheritance of these classic traditions. Such ideals as democratic citizenship, the rule of law, public and private spaces, and civil liberties, find their first articulation in these ancient polities. Indeed, many of the questions and problems that plagued politics in those ancient worlds – What is justice? What are the obligations of rulers and the ruled? What is the best form of government? – are still vibrant today. The course is divided into two parts: The first, set within the context of ancient Athenian thought, examines the invention of democracy, as well as purported critiques of its functioning (Sophocles, Plato, and Aristotle); The second section examines the concept of “the universal” and its genealogy as a political concept in Roman thought (Cicero, Paul, and Augustine). Through close textual readings and contextual analysis we will engage in a systematic comparison of our assumptions about politics with those expressed in these ancient worlds. And, in so doing, we will attempt to further our understanding of contemporary politics and the problems requisite to our own political practices.

Limited to 20 students.  Fall semester.  Professor Poe.

If Overenrolled: Priority will be given to majors and sophomores.

Keywords

Writing attentive

Offerings

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013
 

Taking Notes