Spring 2014

Law Between Plato and the Poets

Listed in: Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, as LJST-136

Formerly listed as: LJST-36

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Adam Sitze (Section 01)

Description

Ancient tragedy, ancient comedy, and Platonic political philosophy pose very different questions about the essence and basis of law, and about law’s relation to such matters as conflict, politics, guilt, love, suffering, action, justice, and wisdom. This course is a preliminary study of the relationships between these differing modes of inquiry. We will spend the first half of the course outlining the theories of law that govern select dramatic works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Aristophanes. In the second half of the course, we will trace the intricate way these theories are at once incorporated into and rejected by Platonic political philosophy, as exemplified by Plato’s Republic. Along the way, we shall weigh and consider competing versions of the “return to Plato” in contemporary philosophy. In addition to reading key works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, and Plato, we will read contemporary texts by Giorgio Agamben, Danielle Allen, Alain Badiou, Hans-Georg Gadamer, René Girard, Martin Heidegger, Bonnie Honig, Bernard Knox, Nicole Loraux, Ramona Naddaff, Martha Nussbaum, Jacques Rancière, Leo Strauss, Jean-Pierre Vernant, and Simone Weil.

Limited to 30 students. Spring semester.  Professor Sitze.

If Overenrolled: Preference will be given to LJST majors

Cost: $55.00 ?

Offerings

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2011, Spring 2014
 

Taking Notes