Spring 2014

Leviathan

Listed in: Political Science, as POSC-111

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Andrew Poe (Section 01)

Description

 [ PT] [PT - starting with the class of 2015] This seminar course is designed to introduce students to the study of politics through the close textual analysis and shared discussion of Thomas Hobbes’ famous 1651 treatise Leviathan, or the Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth, Ecclesiasticall and Civil. For Hobbes, human life was fundamentally unstable and dangerous. Without a common political power, he believed that cooperation was impossible and that human sociability would inevitably result in the most savage of wars. In response, Hobbes set out to develop a science by which a potent political authority could be established, and from which a lasting peace might endure. Hobbes named this authority the "Leviathan," and his account has become one of the most important for Western conceptions of sovereignty. What is political authority? What should government be for? What is a commonwealth? Can there really be a science of politics? How do reason and emotions and our imagination condition our experience of politics? What is sovereignty? What is power? What is justice? Hobbes struggled with these questions, and they will form the basis of our investigations in this course. In addition to Hobbes’ Leviathan, readings will include analysis of the political, social, and literary contexts that inform Hobbes’ thinking, as well as some contemporary theory literature on the significance of the Leviathan for modern political life. 

Limited to 15 students.  Limited to first- and second-year students.  Spring semester.  Professor Poe.

If Overenrolled: Limited to first and second year students

Keywords

Writing attentive

Offerings

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2014