Spring 2016

Race and American Capitalism:  from Slavery to Ferguson

Listed in: Black Studies, as BLST-248  |  History, as HIST-246

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Alec F. Hickmott (Section 01)

Description

(Offered as BLST 248 [US] and HIST 246 [US].)  An unconventional history of capitalism, this class explores the various ways African Americans have experienced and responded to shifts in the organization of the American economy. Beginning with the middle passage and creation of plantation slavery in the New World, we will explore the commodification of African Americans' labor, and the ways in which that labor became a cornerstone of capital accumulation, both globally and in the United States. We continue through the revolutions of emancipation, the rise of Jim Crow and the making of urban America, to our present day reality of deeply rooted, and racialized, economic inequality. More than a history of exploitation, however, we will address the various ways in which African Americans chose to manage both the challenges and possibilities of American capitalist development.  How, for instance, did black ownership of real estate in the segregated South shape Jim Crow governance? To what extent has black business contributed toward struggles for political and social equality? Finally, we will assess the numerous black critics, including intellectuals, activists and working African Americans, of the American political economy. How have such men and women called attention to the ways race and class have combined to shape both black lives and black political subjectivity?

Spring semester.  Visiting Lecturer Hickmott.

Offerings

2017-18: Offered in Fall 2017
Other years: Offered in Spring 2016