Fall 2016

Indigenous World Politics

Listed in: Political Science, as POSC-421

Faculty

Manuela Picq (Section 01)

Description

[IL,G] Indigenous peoples are dynamic political actors in national and global contexts. They have secured their rights in international law, first through Convention 169 at the International Labour Organization (1989), then with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007). They have created innovative political forums and organized global social movements. Global indigenous politics are forging major changes in the international system, thereby disordering conventional understandings of sovereignty.

This course locates indigeneity at the core of international relations and examines indigenous politics from the Andes to the UN. We study international law securing rights for indigenous peoples and analyze indigenous experiences such as the Arctic Council and the election of Bolivian President Evo Morales. The course also explores the epistemological implications of indigenous rights for our understanding of politics. The consolidation of plurinational states in the Andes and indigenous parliaments in the Arctic change the locus of the political, and principles of self-determination challenge Westphalian notions of sovereignty to redefine territoriality.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester.  Visiting Professor Picq.

If Overenrolled: Preference will be given to Political Science majors.

Keywords

Attention to Speaking, Attention to Writing

Offerings

2017-18: Offered in Fall 2017
Other years: Offered in Fall 2016