Fall 2017  -  Get temporary access to course materials (Amherst College and Five-college students only)

Language Crossing and Living in Translation  

Listed in: First Year Seminar, as FYSE-106

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Benigno R. Sanchez-Eppler (Section 01)

Description

When did you start dreaming in a second language? Which translation of the Bible counts as the Word of God? Was Mary a virgin or a maiden? What happens to the immigrant children who need to the be interpreters in the life of their family? How much more tangled or how much more nimble is the wiring of the bilingual brain? What are we doing to our languages when we immerse in a new academic discipline? We will tackle these and other questions like these as we engage in the following units of study:  (1) Babel and language differentiation and diffusion.  (2) European translators from early modern humanism and the Reformation.  (3) Case studies:  Squanto, Malinche and the Navajo Code talkers.  (4) Language in contemporary empires and resistance, migrations and globalization.  (5) Language issues in gay and lesbian diasporas.  (6) Bi- or multi-lingual education.  (7) Literary practitioners of living in and out of translation:  Luis de León, Vladimir Nabokov, Ngugi wa Thiong’o.

The seminar will work with the same texts, issues and exercise for about two-thirds of our time together. The other third we will concentrate on projects that emerge from the students’ own linguistic condition. Students will be required to delve into their own family archives looking for ancestors’ letters written in languages they cannot yet read. They will be encouraged to document/fictionalize the stakes of marrying into another language, or to study and report on the language crossings of their particular diaspora.

Despite the apparent advantage of having more than one language to engage in our work, this course has no prerequisites and its does not exclude monolinguals. When we talk about the cultural contributions, the headiness and the struggles of bi- or multi-lingual individuals, it will be invaluable to have interlocutors who think they live only in one language.

Fall semester.  Lecturer B. Sánchez-Eppler.

Keywords

Attention to Speaking, Attention to Writing, Transnational or World Cultures Taught in English

Offerings

2017-18: Offered in Fall 2017
Other years: Offered in Fall 2015