Spring 2018

Environmental Justice

Listed in: Environmental Studies, as ENST-330

Faculty

Ashwin Ravikumar (Section 01)

Description

From climate change to water and air pollution, environmental degradation harms some groups of people more than others. Today, communities of color in the global North are disproportionately harmed by environmental contamination. The global South writ large faces far more environmental health issues than the global North. And women face unique harms from environmental degradation across the world. Why do these disparities exist? Should everyone have equal access to the same environmental quality, and whose responsibility is it to ensure this in the United States and globally? In this seminar, we will explore how and why factors like race, gender, colonial histories, and contemporary poverty shape the impacts of environmental problems on different communities. We will critically examine the theories and issues of environmental justice and political ecology. Beginning with a review of the history of the U.S. environmental justice movement, we will examine the social and environmental justice dimensions of U.S. and international case studies of fossil fuel extraction, tropical deforestation, urban industrial production, and agricultural intensification. The course will require students to write position papers, facilitate discussions, and produce a final case study analysis of a contemporary environmental justice issue of choice with recommendations for action.

Requisite: ENST 120 or permission of instructor.  Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Professor Ravikumar.

If Overenrolled: priority given to ENST majors and then 4th, 3rd, and 2nd years

Keywords

Attention to Research, Attention to Speaking, Attention to Writing

Offerings

2017-18: Offered in Spring 2018
Other years: Offered in Fall 2015, Spring 2017