Spring 2018

King

Listed in: Black Studies, as BLST-245  |  History, as HIST-250

Faculty

Alec F. Hickmott (Section 01)

Description

This course will explore the life and times of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Through a deep engagement with his published work and public rhetoric, relevant secondary literature, and personal papers, students will locate the civil rights leader within the broader upheavals of mid-century America. As such, the course serves as an introduction to modern US history, the black freedom struggle, and the archive of civil rights. Moving beyond mythology, this course will emphasize his connections to American liberalism, the labor movement, the black prophetic tradition and human rights. As such, this course will excavate the radical King, a man whose life and work often challenged the liberal consensus on questions of class, race, and empire, and thus questions later ahistorical characterizations of the Civil Rights Movement as either “moderate” or “conservative.”  The course will culminate in a student research-led conference, to mark and reflect upon the fiftieth anniversary of King’s assassination in 1968. Two class meetings per week.

Limited to 20 students.  Spring semester.  Visiting Lecturer Hickmott.

If Overenrolled: Preference to History and BLST majors.

Keywords

Attention to Issues of Class, Attention to Issues of Gender and Sexuality, Attention to Issues of Race

Offerings

2017-18: Offered in Spring 2018