Spring 2019

Guns in American Politics

Listed in: Political Science, as POSC-152

Moodle site: Course

Faculty

Jonathan M. Obert (Section 01)

Description

This class will address the politics of gun ownership, as well as the meanings of guns in American civic life. Focusing on the philosophical, social, legal, institutional, cultural, and economic lenses through which Americans have made sense of the role of firearms in American politics, this class will use firearms policy to explore a range of questions: how has our understanding of self-protection changed or not over time? What was the role of the Second Amendment in the making of the Constitution? How do we make sense of the controversies and debates that have surrounded the “right to bear arms” and its interpretation in legal and historical scholarship? How does mobilization around guns and gun rights reflect and shape racial, ethnic, and gender identities? Where and when do such mobilizations occur? In what ways are U.S. policies and attitudes actually exceptional among developed countries? In this sense, guns serve as a way of putting into sharp focus deeper questions about the institutional and social contexts of belonging and exclusion in U.S. politics.

Limited to 30 students. Spring semester. Professor Obert.

If Overenrolled: Preference will be given to Political Science majors.

Keywords

Attention to Speaking, Attention to Writing

Offerings

2019-20: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2019