Fall 2020

Arendt's Judgments 

Listed in: Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, as LJST-253

Moodle site: Course (Guest Accessible)

Faculty

Adam Sitze (Section 01)

Description

Fearlessly independent, tenaciously unclassifiable, frequently controversial, and always thought-provoking, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) is without question one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century. Setting aside the conventional interpretation of Arendt as a political theorist, this course will focus on Arendt’s contributions to the study of law, with special attention to Arendt’s unusual inquiries into human rights, international criminal law, constitutional law, and civil disobedience. By carefully reading select writings by Arendt alongside key events in twentieth century history, we shall trace in Arendt’s texts a relation between thought, crisis, and judgment that is often occluded by the dominant reception of her thought. Along the way, we shall ask how Arendt arrived at her various judgments, what it means for thought to relate to law and to the world, and why judgment might offer a way to respond to, and live through, the crises of one’s present.

Limited to 40 students. Fall Semester. Professor Sitze. Class will be taught online only.

If Overenrolled: Preference given to LJST majors

Keywords

Online Only

Offerings

2020-21: Offered in Fall 2020
Other years: Offered in Fall 2020