Admissions Requirements

Course Admission Instructions for Fall 2015

English 221 / Writing Poetry 1 / David Sofield

Students interested in Writing Poetry I with David Sofield are invited to submit a poem or two or three to Prof. Sofield either in his mailbox in Johnson Chapel or by email attachment addressed to drsofield@amherst.edu.   Submissions should be made no later than the day before the first class. All students interested in the course must attend the first class session.  The final class list will be determined shortly after the first class.

English 226 / Fiction Writing I / Judith Frank (section 01)

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

For admission to the course, please submit a sample of your best work in any genre (fiction, poetry, essay) of no more than ten pages double-spaced, along with any relevant information about your efforts to get into the class in previous semesters.  Submissions are due by email no later than Tuesday, September 1st. I wll be in touch via email shortly before the semester begins. Professor Frank can be reached at jefrank@amherst.edu.

English 226 / Fiction Writing I /Amity Gaige (section 02)

This course is an introduction to the craft of fiction writing.  Students will read and discuss work by masters of the short story, and will complete a variety of writing assignments, including exercises and a full-length story.  Class time will be divided between discussion of assigned readings and workshop of student fiction.  Attendance of the Amherst College Reading Series required.

Enrollment is limited. To apply, please submit a five to ten page sample of prose writing (either fiction or creative nonfiction, double-spaced) to Amity Gaige, along with a brief letter about why you want to take the class.  Include your email on your cover letter.  Please place both in my box at Webster 214. The deadline for application is September 1.  I will be in touch with admitted students shortly before the start of classes. 

 

Course Admission Requirements for Spring 2015

English 221, Poetry I, Patrick Pritchett

Please submit five short (one-page) poems on the first day of class. Results of admission will be posted outside the CW office in Webster.

English 225,  Non-Fiction Writing, Kim Townsend

Please send a writing sample to Professor Townsend, care of the English Department, by Tuesday, January 21st (hard copy preferred). Then come to the first class meeting. Professor Townsend will post a list of admitted students outside the English Department office in Johnson Chapel by the end of the day on Friday the 23rd.

Non-Fiction Writing covers a lot of territory. Your sample could be descriptive or reflective prose, an example of your autobiographical or memoiristic writing, or it could simply be writing you have done for a class -- a paper, in other words. Professor Townsend can be contacted at rctownsend@amherst.edu.

English 226, Fiction Writing I, Judith Frank

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

For admission to the course, please submit a sample of your best work in any genre (fiction, poetry, essay) of no more than ten pages double-spaced, along with any relevant information about your efforts to get into the class in previous semesters.  Submissions are due by email no later than Monday, January 19th. I wll be in touch via email by the end of the day January 21. Professor Frank can be reached at jefrank@amherst.edu.

English 255, Unreliabilities, Amity Gaige

This literature course focuses on unreliable narrators, and on the problem of truth-telling in subjective expression.  We will read many novels and works of non-fiction, from writers such as Ford Maddox Ford, Janet Malcolm, and Lauren Slater.  Students will be required to produce both critical writing and creative writing.  The course is writing intensive.  Creative writing experience preferred.  Attendance at several evening readings is required.  This course is limited to 15 students.  Please bring a short creative writing sample to the first class, fiction or non-fiction, as well as a short letter to me about why you'd like to take the class.  Over-enrollment will be decided by writing sample. Amity Gaige can be reached at agaige@amherst.edu.

English 325, Imitations, Daniel Hall

A poetry writing course, but with a strong emphasis on reading. Students will closely examine the work of various poets from different periods, then attempt to write plausible imitations of their own, all by way of learning about poetry from the inside, as it were. 

Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose). A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter.  Daniel Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113

English 427, Crafting the Novel, Amity Gaige

This course will concern novel writing in all of its stages – conception, design, research, and writing.  Students will begin three different novels via three conceptual angles, yielding 70-100 pages of writing in total by the end of the semester.  Extensive reading will also be assigned, as well as mandatory attendance of the Amherst College Reading Series.  All writing must be original to this course.  Since this is an advanced course, it will be run in the spirit of a graduate level workshop.  Short oral presentations and turns at class leadership will be asked of each class member.  The writing of novels is grounded in both technique and in mystery, and the novel’s more elusive qualities will require investigation by each individual student, as well as the group.  Please bring a fiction sample of 10 pages to the first class meeting, as well as a letter to me about why you'd like to take the class.  Note that the prerequisite for this course is Fiction I or the equivalent.  Course enrollment will be determined within 24 hours of the first class. Amity Gaige can be reached at agaige@amherst.edu.

 

Course Admission Requirements for Fall 2014

English 221. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose). A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 226. Fiction Writing 1. Amity Gaige.

This course is an introduction to the craft of fiction writing.  Students will read and discuss work by masters of the short story, and will complete a variety of writing assignments, including exercises and full-length stories.  Class time will be divided between discussion of assigned readings and workshop of student fiction.  Attendance of the Amherst College Reading Series required.

Enrollment is limited. To apply, please submit a sample of prose writing (either fiction or nonfiction) of no more than ten pages double-spaced to Amity Gaige, along with a brief letter about why you want to take the class. Include your email on your cover letter. Please place both in my box at Webster 214. The deadline for application is the first day of classes, Tuesday September 2nd. I will place a class list outside of the English Department Office in Johnson Chapel by the end of the day Friday September 5th. Note that in Fall 2014, the first Wednesday classes will meet on September 10.

English 324. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent. 

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting. A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) as soon as possible.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

 

Course Admission Requirements for Fall 2014

English 226. Fiction 1. Susan Stinson.

For admission to the course, please submit a sample of your best work in any genre (fiction, poetry, essay) of no more than ten pages double-spaced, along with a brief letter about why you want to take the class.  Submissions are due by email no later than January 21. I wll be in touch via email by the end of the day January 23. Email: sstinson@amherst.edu

English 221. Writing Poetry I. David Sofield and Richard Wilbur.

Students interested in Writing Poetry I with David Sofield and Richard Wilbur are invited to submit a poem or two or three to Prof. Sofield either in his mailbox in Johnson Chapel or by email attachment addressed to drsofield@amherst.edu.  All students interested in the course should attend the first class session in January.  The final class list will be determined shortly after the first class.

English 326. Fiction II. Amity Gaige.

In this advanced fiction workshop, students will complete two or three short stories as well as a variety of exercises, in addition to lengthy weekly readings.  Attendance at evening readings in the Amherst College Reading Series is required.

For admission to the course, please bring a sample of 10 pages of fiction (short story or novel excerpt) to the first class, along with a brief cover sheet that includes your year, major, confirmation of writing prerequisite (Fiction 1 or the equivalent), and email address.

I will inform you of your enrollment status within a day or two of the first class.

 

Course Admission Instructions for Fall 2013

These are the admissions guidelines for Fall 2013 workshops. Please make sure that your name and contact information are on all submissions. Please contact Catherine Newman if you have any additional questions: 542-8200 or crnewman@amherst.edu.

English 226. Fiction Writing 1. Amity Gaige.

This course is an introduction to the craft of fiction writing.  Students will read and discuss work by masters of the short story, and will complete a variety of writing assignments, including exercises and full-length stories.  Class time will be divided between discussion of assigned readings and workshop of student fiction.  Attendance of the Amherst College Reading Series required.

Enrollment is limited.  To apply, please submit a sample of prose writing (either fiction or nonfiction) of no more than ten pages double-spaced to Amity Gaige in Webster 214, along with a brief letter about why you want to take the class.  (Please place both in my box.)  Please include your email on your cover letter.  The deadline for application is Wednesday September 4th.  I will place a class list outside of my office in Webster by the end of the day Friday September 6th.  Note that in Fall 2013, the first Wednesday classes will meet on September 11. 

English 221. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose). A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 324. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent. 

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting. A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) as soon as possible.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

Previously: Spring 2013

English 221. Writing Poetry I. David Sofield and Richard Wilbur.

Students interested in Writing Poetry I with David Sofield and Richard Wilbur are invited to submit a poem or two or three to Prof. Sofield either in his mailbox in Johnson Chapel or by email attachment addressed to drsofield@amherst.edu.  All students interested in the course should attend the first class session in January.  The final class list will be determined shortly after the first class.

English 226. Fiction Writing 1. Judith Frank.

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

Please note that I am not prepared to teach the writing of science fiction.

My instructions: For admission to the course, submit a writing sample of no more than ten pages in *any genre*: fiction, poetry, drama, essay. This should simply be a piece of writing that you believe represents your very best work. Submissions are due by email, by January 21st. 

Email: jefrank@amherst.edu.

ENGL-225 Non-Fiction Writing Robert C. Townsend 

Please send a writing sample to Professor Townsend, care of the English Department, by Tuesday, January 22nd (hard copy preferred). Then come to the first class meeting. Professor Townsend will post a list of admitted students outside the English Department office in Johnson Chapel.

Non-Fiction Writing covers a lot of territory. Your sample could be descriptive or reflective prose, an example of your autobiographical or memoiristic writing, or it could simply be writing you have done for a class -- a paper, in other words. Professor Townsend can be contacted at rctownsend@amherst.edu.

Unreliabilities. English 255. Amity Gaige.

This literature course focuses on unreliable narrators, and on the problem of truth-telling in subjective expression.  We will read many novels and works of non-fiction, from writers such as Ford Maddox Ford, Janet Malcolm, and Lauren Slater.  Students will be required to produce both critical writing and creative writing.  Creative writing experience preferred.  This course is limited to 15 students.  Please bring a short creative writing sample to the first class, fiction or non-fiction.  Over-enrollment will be decided by writing sample.

* Please note: Unreliabilities will start one day late at the beginning of the spring semester.  There will be no meeting on Monday, January 28.  The first class will be on Wednesday January 30.  Professor Gaige will be sure to establish a final class list within 24 hours of that meeting.

Imitations (ENG 325) Daniel Hall

A poetry writing course, but with a strong emphasis on reading. Students will closely examine the work of various poets from different periods, then attempt to write plausible imitations of their own, all by way of learning about poetry from the inside, as it were.

Limited to 15 students. Preregistration is not allowed. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose). A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

ENGL-427 Crafting the Novel  Amity W. Gaige 

This course will concern novel writing in all of its stages – conception, design, research, and writing.  Students will begin three different novels via three conceptual angles, yielding 70-100 pages of writing in total by the end of the semester.  Extensive reading will also be assigned, as well as mandatory attendance of the Amherst College Reading Series.  All writing must be original to this course.  Since this is an advanced course, it will be run in the spirit of a graduate level workshop.  Short oral presentations and turns at class leadership will be asked of each class member.  The writing of novels is grounded in both technique and in mystery, and the novel’s more elusive qualities will require investigation by each individual student, as well as the group.  Please bring a fiction sample of 10-20 pages to the first class meeting, as well as an informal letter to me about your experience and goals as a writer.

Words and Music for Theater Performance THDA-280 / MUSI-260 Bashford/Meltzer

Enrollment is limited. We are looking for student composers and student writers. You do not need to have experience in both, just one or the other. Student composers may work in any style, and may make scores or compose by ear (with keyboard or guitar). Student writers may have experience in playwriting, fiction, poetry and/or creative non-fiction.

The submissions deadline is Wednesday, December 12. Applications will be acknowledged by email; a class list will be emailed to all applicants by January 15 . Apply by sending an e-mail with attachments to both rdbashford88@amherst.edu and hymeltzer88@amherst.edu. Send two samples of creative work.

The samples may be music composition, or may be either poetry or prose.

Music submissions, either scores or recordings, should be two distinct compositions, together no longer than fifteen minutes' duration. Scores should be sent in .pdf format; mp3 recordings may be sent via www.yousendit.com only to hymeltzer88@amherst.edu. Music submissions do not need to contain text or singing.

Prose submissions each should be no more than five double-spaced pages for each selection; poetry submissions each should be between three and five single-spaced pages. Excerpts from longer work are acceptable.

 

Course Admission Requirements for Fall 2012

English 221. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose). A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 226. Fiction Writing I. Lawrence Douglas

This course is an introduction to the craft of fiction writing.  Students will read and discuss work by masters of the short story, and will complete a variety of writing assignments, including expository sketches, formal exercises, and full-length stories.  Class time will be divided between discussion of assigned readings and workshop of student fiction.

Enrollment is limited.  To apply, send by email attachment to lrdouglas@amherst.edu a sample of prose
writing (either fiction or nonfiction) of no more than ten pages double-spaced. The deadline for application is August 27.  Applications will be acknowledged by email and a class list will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) by Sept 3. 

English 324. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent. 

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting. A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) as soon as possible.

Professor Hall can be reached by email at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

 

Course Admission Requirements for Spring 2012

English 221. Writing Poetry I. David Sofield and Richard Wilbur.

Students interested in Writing Poetry I with David Sofield and Richard Wilbur are invited to submit a poem or two or three to Prof. Sofield either in his mailbox in Johnson Chapel or by email attachment addressed to drsofield@amherst.edu.  All students interested in the course should attend the first class session in January.  The final class list will be determined shortly after the first class.

English 225. Nonfiction Writing. Robert Hayashi.

Please submit a short sample (10-15 pages) of your prose. This sample is due via email by January 17. Send writing samples to rhayashi@amherst.edu. The professor will try to email students by the end of the week with a list of those admitted.

English 226. Fiction Writing 1. Judith Frank.

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

Please note that I am not prepared to teach the writing of science fiction.

My instructions: For admission to the course, submit a writing sample of no more than ten pages in *any genre*: fiction, poetry, drama, essay. This should simply be a piece of writing that you believe represents your very best work. Submissions are due by email, by January 16. 

Email: jefrank@amherst.edu.

English 255. UnreliabilitiesAmity Gaige.

This literature course focuses on unreliable narrators, and on the problem of truth-telling in subjective expression.  We will read many novels and works of non-fiction, from writers such as Ford Maddox Ford, Janet Malcolm, and Lauren Slater.  Students will be required to produce both critical writing and creative writing.  Creative writing experience preferred.  This course is limited to 15 students.  Please bring a short creative writing sample to the first class, fiction or non-fiction.  Over-enrollment will be decided by writing sample. 

English 324. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent. 

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting. 

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) and on this web page as soon as possible.

 Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 326. Fiction II. Amity Gaige.

In this advanced fiction workshop, students will complete two or three short stories as well as a variety of exercises, in addition to lengthy weekly readings.  Attendance at evening readings in the Amherst College Reading Series is required.

For admission to the course, please bring a sample of 10 pages of fiction (short story or novel excerpt) to the first class, along with a brief cover sheet that includes your year, major, confirmation of writing prerequisite, and email address.

I will inform you of your enrollment status within a day or two of the first class.  

 

Course Admission Requirements for Fall 2011

English 221. Writing Poetry I. John Hennessy.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose).

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Hennessy can be reached by e-mail at murhen@earthlink.net.

English 226. Fiction Writing 1. Amity Gaige.

PLEASE NOTE: CHANGE IN ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS for ENG 226, FICTION WRITING I

Admission to the course is being extended until the first class, Tuesday September 6.  Please come to this class with a ten-page writing sample in prose (fiction or nonfiction) along with a brief letter of intent that lets me know why you want to be in the class.

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY SUBMITTED VIA MAIL, in advance, you do not need to bring another copy.  All students who submit work on or before the first class will be notified about enrollment by the following day, September 7.

Please include your email address on your letter of intent.

Questions? agaige@amherst.edu

ENGL-17 Unreliabilities. Amity Gaige.

This literature course focuses on unreliable narrators, and on the problem of truth-telling in subjective expression.  We will read many novels and works of non-fiction, from writers such as Kazuo Ishiguro, Vladimir Nabokov, Janet Malcolm, and Lauren Slater.  Students will be required to produce both critical writing and creative writing.  Creative writing experience preferred.  This course is limited to 15 students.  Please bring a short writing sample to the first class, preferably fiction or creative non-fiction.  Over-enrollment will be decided by writing sample. 

ENGL-25 Non-Fiction Writing Robert C. Townsend 

Please send a writing sample to Professor Townsend, care of the English Department, by Friday, January 21st (hard copy preferred). Then come to the first class meeting. Professor Townsend will post a list of admitted students outside the English Department office in Johnson Chapel.

Non-Fiction Writing covers a lot of territory. Your sample could be descriptive or reflective prose, an example of your autobiographical or memoiristic writing, or it could simply be writing you have done for a class -- a paper, in other words.

ENGL-26 Fiction Writing I Judith E. Frank 

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

Please note that I am not prepared to teach the writing of science fiction.

My instructions: For admission to the course, submit a writing sample of no more than ten pages in *any genre*: fiction, poetry, drama, essay. This should simply be a piece of writing that you believe represents your very best work. Submissions are due by email, by January 17. 

Email: jefrank@amherst.edu.

English 27. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall and Richard Wilbur.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent. 

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting. 

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) and on this web page as soon as possible.

 Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113. 

English 28 (Fiction 11) Amity Gaige

In this advanced fiction workshop, students will complete two short stories as well as a variety of exercises, in addition to weekly readings.  Several evening meetings required.    

For admission to the course, please submit a writing sample of 10-20 pages of fiction (short story or novel excerpt), along with a brief cover sheet that includes your year, major, confirmation of writing prerequisite, and email address. Submissions are due by January 15th; please send them to:

Amity Gaige 
Creative Writing Center 
Box 2235 
Amherst College 
Amherst, MA 01002 

I will be in touch with you before classes start to let you know if you've been admitted.  

English 21. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose).

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 24. Screenwriting. Chris Mason Johnson.

This course is a first workshop in narrative screenplay writing. We’ll  focus on the fundamentals of scene and story shape as they’re understood within the professional world of filmmaking in the United States. In addition, we’ll take a broader look at what a “screenplay” might be outside of this world. In the process, we’ll examine both the craft of cinematic storytelling (protagonists, character arc, conflict, dialogue, action, exposition, beginning-middle-end), and the more elastic possibilities of the audio-visual medium itself. Frequent exercises and in-class screenings. Previous filmmaking or writing courses are recommended but not required. First semester. Limited to 15 students. 
Preregistration is not allowed.  Interested students should attend the first class. 

Admission will be based on an in-class writing exercise given during the first class. No pre-registration. A list of admitted students will be posted/emailed the following morning. 

I can be reached at chrismasonjohn@gmail.com  if you have any questions.

English 26. Fiction Writing 1. Amity Gaige.

For admission to the course, please submit a ten-page writing sample in prose (fiction or nonfiction) along with a brief letter of intent that lets me know why you want to be in the class. Submissions are due by August 31st; send them to:

Amity Gaige
Creative Writing Center
Box 2235
Amherst College
Amherst, MA 01002

Please include your email address and I will be in touch with you before classes start to let you know if you've been admitted.

Questions? agaige@etal.uri.edu.

Course Admission Requirements for Spring 2010 

English 21. Writing Poetry I. David Sofield / Richard Wilbur

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring and bring a sample of poems you have written (three or so pages).  You may submit your sample before the first class to drsofield@amherst.edu; if you do, attendance at the first class meeting remains mandatory.

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

English 26. Fiction Writing 1. Alexander Chee

To apply, please email me a 12-page double-spaced typed sample of what you consider to be your best prose writing, fiction or nonfiction, no later than Friday, January 22nd. achee@amherst.edu. You will be notified of your standing by email by the first day of classes. 

 

Course Admission Requirements for Fall 2009

English 21. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose).

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 24. Screenwriting. Sabina Murray.

This is an introductory course in screenwriting with a focus on narrative.
At least one film course and/or one creative writing course at the college
level recommended.  We will look at film, adaptation, structure, and "the
business," with an emphasis on workshopping original screenplays.

Please send a letter of intent that lets me know why you want to be in the
class, along with a five page writing sample. Preference will be given to
juniors and seniors, so please indicate your year. Admission deadline: August 30th.

Sabina Murray
Creative Writing Center
Box 2235
Amherst College
Amherst, MA 01002

ENGL-26 Fiction Writing I Judith E. Frank 

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

Please note that I am not prepared to teach the writing of science fiction.

My instructions: For admission to the course, submit a writing sample of no more than ten pages in *any genre*: fiction, poetry, drama, essay. This should simply be a piece of writing that you believe represents your very best work. Submissions are due by email, by September 1. I will post a class list outside my office door (Johnson Chapel 12) by September 4.

Email: jefrank@amherst.edu.

English 27. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent.

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting.

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) and on this web page as soon as possible.

 Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

ENGL-28 Fiction Writing II Alexander S. Chee

This is an advanced workshop in writing fiction. Students are expected to workshop 4 stories or novel excerpts over the course of the semester, and to read and comment on the work of their fellow students.

To apply, please send a sample of what you consider to be your best writing: stories, excerpts from novels in progress. Limit your manuscript to 20 pages. You should have completed Fiction I or some other introductory fiction writing class in order to take this class, though I can waive this requirement.

Send your manuscripts to me at achee@amherst.edu or by mail to

Creative Writing Center Box 2235 Amherst College Amherst, MA 01002

Mark your submission Fiction II and include your email contact information and telephone number. Members of the class will be notified directly and the final class list will be posted on the first day of classes.

Deadline for application: August 30th.

 

Course Admission Instructions for Spring 2009

English 21. Writing Poetry I. David Sofield / Richard Wilbur

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring and bring a sample of poems you have written (three or so pages).  You may submit your sample before the first class to drsofield@amherst.edu; if you do, attendance at the first
remains mandatory..

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Sofield can be reached by e-mail at drsofield@amherst.edu or by phone at 542-2577.

English 26. Fiction Writing I. Chris Bachelder.

This course is an introduction to the craft of fiction writing, with an
emphasis on reading like a writer.  Students will read and discuss published
work, and they will complete a variety of writing assignments--short analyses,
exercises, stories.  Class time will be divided between discussion of published
stories and workshop of student fiction.

Enrollment is limited.  To apply, send by email attachment a sample of prose
writing (either fiction or nonfiction) of no more than 12 pages double-spaced.
The deadline for application is Jan. 19.  Applications will be acknowledged by
email and a class list will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center
(Webster 212) by Jan. 26.

email:  cbachelder@english.umass.edu

English 28. Fiction II. Alexander Chee

This is an advanced workshop in writing fiction. Students are expected to workshop 4 stories or novel excerpts over the course of the semester, and to read and comment on the work of their fellow students.

To apply, please send a sample of what you consider to be your best writing: stories, excerpts from novels in progress. Limit your manuscript to 20 pages. You should have completed Fiction I or some other introductory fiction writing class in order to take this class, though I can waive this requirement.

Send your manuscripts to me at achee@amherst.edu or by mail to

Creative Writing Center Box 2235 Amherst College Amherst, MA 01002

Mark your submission Fiction II and include your email contact information and telephone number. Members of the class will be notified directly and the final class list will be posted also on Monday, January 26th, the first day of classes.

Deadline for application: Saturday, January 24th, 2008.

 

Course Admission Instructions from Fall 2008:

English 21. Writing Poetry I. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry I is an introductory writing workshop. In addition to discussing one another's poems, students will read exemplary poetry of the past and present, and acquire a basic knowledge of English prosody. There will be weekly writing assignments, formal or thematic.

Limited enrollment. Please attend the first class meeting and bring a five-page writing sample (poetry and/or prose).

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) shortly thereafter. We'll try to post the list here on this page as well.

Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113.

English 24. Screenwriting. Sabina Murray.

This is an introductory course in screenwriting with a focus on narrative. At least one film course and/or one creative writing course at the college level recommended.  We will look at film, adaptation, structure, and "the business," with an emphasis on workshopping original screenplay.

Admission will be on a first come basis with preference given to juniors and seniors.

 English 26. Fiction Writing 1. Alexander Chee.

An introductory course in the elements of fiction writing, conducted through writing exercises, workshops and assigned readings. Each week will focus on a different point of craft or technique (dramatic scene, style, revision, etc.). Students do not need any prior experience writing fiction specifically. We'll look at how to discover, develop and set the working habits of the kind of writer you are, and question what we think of as fictions and how they can be made.
 
Application Procedure: 
To apply, please send a sample of what you consider to be your best writing: stories, excerpts from novels, essays, critical papers, serial blog postings (please print these out or format them in MSWord or rtf), letters, and poetry. Your submission should be no longer than 12 pages double-spaced and typed, and if you are submitting a part of something longer, please include a short synopsis of 1-3 paragraphs. Submit work either by email to me at achee@amherst.edu, or by regular mail to
 
 Creative Writing Center
 Box 2235
 Amherst College
 Amherst, MA 01002
 
Deadline for applications is August 29th. Mark your submission Fiction 1, in the subject line if by email, and include your email contact information and telephone number. Members of the class will be notified directly and the final class list will be posted by 8AM Sept. 1. Students will be notified by email of their status.

English 27. Writing Poetry II. Daniel Hall.

Writing Poetry II is an advanced writing workshop for students who have taken Writing Poetry I or the equivalent.

Limited enrollment. Please bring a five-page writing sample (poetry only) to the first class meeting.

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) and on this web page as soon as possible.

Professor Hall can be reached by e-mail at djhall@amherst.edu or by phone at 253-2113. 

 

Course Admission Requirements for Spring 2008 

ENGL-21 Writing Poetry I John J. Hennessy 

Writing Poetry I is an introductory creative writing workshop. This course will integrate in-class writing exercises and weekly poetry assignments with an introduction to the study of prosody, traditional lyric forms, and departures. We will read complete collections by a diverse group of contemporary authors in addition to our anthology selections. Class time will be divided between workshops, discussion of the weekly readings, and enjoyable, informal writing assignments.

Enrollment is limited, so please attend the first class meeting. Be sure to bring a five-page writing sample of poetry and/or prose. Please include your name on every page of the sample, and provide your contact information on the first page (name, school, year, phone, e-mail).

A list of admitted students will be posted outside the Creative Writing Center (Webster 212) soon after the first class meeting. We will try to post a class list on this page as well.

John Hennessy can be reached at murhen@earthlink.net.

ENGL-25 Non-Fiction Writing Robert C. Townsend 

Please send a writing sample to Professor Townsend, care of the English Department, by Tuesday, January 29th (hard copy preferred). Then come to the first class meeting. Professor Townsend will post a list of admitted students outside his office by Wednesday evening.

Non-Fiction Writing covers a lot of territory. Your sample could be descriptive or reflective prose, an example of your autobiographical or memoiristic writing, or it could simply be writing you have done for a class -- a paper, in other words.

ENGL-26 Fiction Writing I Judith E. Frank 

Writing Fiction I is an introductory course in fiction writing. We will begin by reading short stories and discussing their craft, and then move to a workshop format where the discussion focuses on student writing.

Please note that I am not prepared to teach the writing of science fiction.

My instructions: For admission to the course, submit a writing sample of no more than ten pages in *any genre*: fiction, poetry, drama, essay. This should simply be a piece of writing that you believe represents your very best work. Submissions are due in the English Department, or by email, by Monday, Jan. 21. Please label them clearly: "English 26 writing sample." I will post a class list outside my office door (Johnson Chapel 12) by the first day of classes.

Email: jefrank@amherst.edu.

ENGL-28 Fiction Writing II Alexander S. Chee

This is an advanced workshop in writing fiction. Students are expected to workshop 4 stories or novel excerpts over the course of the semester, and to read and comment on the work of their fellow students.

To apply, please send a sample of what you consider to be your best writing: stories, excerpts from novels in progress. Limit your manuscript to 20 pages. You should have completed Fiction I or some other introductory fiction writing class in order to take this class, though I can waive this requirement.

Send your manuscripts to me at achee@amherst.edu or by mail to

Creative Writing Center Box 2235 Amherst College Amherst, MA 01002

Mark your submission Fiction II and include your email contact information and telephone number. Members of the class will be notified directly and the final class list will be posted also on Monday, January 28th, the first day of classes.

Deadline for application: Saturday, January 26th, 2008.