Stay tuned for Upcoming Events for Fall 2022

FAMS is pleased to offer events in support of its academic mission, including screenings by established and burgeoning filmmakers, guest lectures by critical historians and theorists, and workshops/lectures by writers and producers working in film, television, video and new media.

Please note: The FAMS calendar also features film screening opportunities sponsored by other departments on the Amherst College campus

Past FAMS events

A man wearing a red shirt looks out over land from which he has been barred by a wire fence

Virtual Conversation with filmmakers Roberto Romero and Carolina Canguçu on the Indigenous visual cartography of This Land is our Land!

virtual event

Co-directors of NŨHŨ YÃGMŨ YÕG HÃM: This Land is our Land!, Roberto Romero and Carolina Canguçui along with Brazilian indigenous filmmakers Isael and Sueli Maxakali and their collaborators created a unique and multilayered indigenous visual cartography. The film shifts across multiple forms, combining mourning practices, rituals, and chanting, with interviews and observational material to create a study of white violence that reminds us of the urgency of seeing beyond the western gaze. Sharing their complex understanding of physical, historical, and mythological space through the film’s form, the filmmakers chart a hypnotic journey that acts as a manifesto against all kinds of borders, those that divide nations and those that demarcate land. Farmers in the area may have violently taken their land, but this has not silenced them, as is shown by this film with its tender yet boldly confrontational gaze.

On Wednesday May 4th from 8:30AM-9:50AM, filmmakers Roberto Romero and Carolina Canguçu will discuss cinema as Indigenous visual cartography in the making of NŨHŨ YÃGMŨ YÕG HÃM: This Land is our Land!. If you would like to attend this virtual conversation, please email prangan@amherst.edu; a recording will also be made available for the Amherst community. 

three people sit at a table; subtitle reads 'my mom looks at me, as I speak.  My dad looks down at the contract.'

Virtual Conversation with Jordan Lord on disability justice and accessible filmmaking - *CANCELED, WILL BE RESCHEDULED, STAND BY FOR UPDATES!*

virtual event

An artist, filmmaker, and writer, Jordan Lord’s work concerns the conditions of disability and access, and legacies of debt and neglect under capitalism. Integrating audio description to refract the perspectives of the people on camera and using both captions and their own body to delimit what parts of each image are shown, their films consider how access renders and interrupts standard aesthetic, social, and institutional protocols. In Shared Resources (2020), pictured here, Lord observes how they and their family are caught up in various financial, legal and medical apparatuses––and how these apparatuses get involved with practices of documentary filmmaking. The film reflects on how disability and debt both break open and intimately contract the frames placed on dependency and care. In their conversation on Wednesday, April 27th from 8:30 am to 9:50 am, Lord will discuss disability justice and accessible filmmaking as an abolitionist practice of care. If you would like to attend this virtual conversation, please email prangan@amherst.edu; a recording will also be made available for the Amherst community. 

black and white image of tree against mountainside landscape with film title

Virtual Conversation with filmmaker Brett Story on cinema as a practice of abolitionist geography

virtual event

 In the United States there are 2.2 million people in prison, up from only 300,000 forty years ago, yet for most Americans, prisons have never felt more distant or more out of sight. A cinematic journey through a series of seemingly ordinary American landscapes (from a California mountainside where female prisoners fight raging wildfires, to a Bronx warehouse with goods destined for the state correctional system, to a rural Kentucky mining town that now depends on the local penitentiary for jobs), Brett Story's The Prison in Twelve Landscapes excavates the hidden world of the modern prison system and explores lives outside the gates affected by prisons.

On April 6th from 8:30-9:50 AM, Brett Story (director of The Prison in Twelve Landscapes) will discuss cinema as a practice of abolitionist geography, and what it means to document the prison at a time of its disappearance from the field of vision. If you would like to attend this virtual conversation, please email prangan@amherst.edu; a recording will also be made available for the Amherst community. 

digital rendition of faces rendered in white on bright pink background

Virtual Lecture by media scholar Joshua Glick on the rise of deepfakes, disinformation, and civic uses of synthetic media

virtual event

Dr. Joshua Glick is the Isabelle Peregrin Assistant Professor of English, Film & Media Studies at Hendrix College and a Fellow at the Open Documentary Lab at MIT. Glick's research and teaching explore global documentary, critical race studies, television, early cinema, emerging media, and Hollywood as an evolving form of industrial and artistic production. His articles have appeared in such journals as  Film History, Immerse, Jump Cut, Film Quarterly,  The Los Angeles Review of BooksThe Moving Image, and the  Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. His book,  Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 (University of California Press, 2018) was selected as a finalist for the Richard Wall Memorial Award from the Theatre Library Association. Dr. Glick also works actively in the public humanities. In collaboration with the Center for Advanced Virtuality at MIT, he recently designed the interactive online curriculum, "Media Literacy in the Age of Deepfakes." He co-curated an exhibition currently on view at the Museum of the Moving Image in NYC: "Deepfake: Unstable Evidence on Screen." 

On Monday, April 18th from 1:30 - 2:50pm, Joshua Glick will discuss the past and present of media manipulation, the rise of deepfakes, and the civic uses of synthetic media. If you would like to attend this virtual conversation, please email prangan@amherst.edu; a recording will also be made available for the Amherst community. 

black and white headshot photo of Professor Christopher Harris

Helene Keyssar Distinguished Lecture in Film and Media Studies: "Filmmaking in the Wake: Found Footage, Found Sound, and Black Nostalgia."

Christopher Harris, F. Wendell Miller Associate Professor and Head of Film and Video Production at University of Iowa

Christopher Harris is a filmmaker whose films and video installations read African American historiography through the poetics and aesthetics of experimental cinema. His work employs manually and photo-chemically altered appropriated moving images, staged re-enactments of archival artifacts and interrogations of documentary conventions. His current project is a series of optically-printed 16mm experimental films in conversation with canonical works of African-American literature.

On March 25th at 3:00pm in the Stirn Auditorium, Harris will deliver the 2022 Kessar Lecture. Moderated Q&A and a reception will follow and livestreaming will be available.

Talk Description

How can we rethink obsolescence, historical context and perhaps even nostalgia in regard to Black cinematic practices employing analog found footage? In this talk, Christopher Harris will discuss his bricolage filmmaking practice that remixes and mismatches source materials drawn from the detritus of visual and sonic cultures. Highlighting the ways in which he juxtaposes and layers free floating sound/image fragments as an act of refusal, Harris will explain how his films resist what Sylvia Wynter describes as the “narratively condemned status” so insistently imposed upon the Black diaspora by the absences and silences of the archive. As Harris puts it, his films meet the epistemic violence of the archive on its own terms, matching it silence for silence, rupture for rupture, and gap for gap.

Film Screening

On March 24th at 5:00pm in the Keefe Campus Theater, Harris will screen his landmark film still/here (2000, 60 mins, shot on 16mm), a stunning meditation on urban ruin and extraction in the predominantly African-American northern St. Louis, along with two other short films.

 

Further details are available on our Keyssar Lecture Series page.

black and white photo of old Criterion St. Louis sign

Image from still/here (image description: low angle black and white shot of the front of a movie theater. The marquee is falling apart, but the sign remains intact: CRITERION).

image of ocean waves and cloudy sky with the title of the film and filmmaker scrawled across in black ink

Małni – Towards the ocean, Towards the Shore

A Viewing Opportunity and Livestreamed Q&A

Sponsored by the Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival

Available for streaming on Sparq through April 28, MMFF invites you to watch the film and join for a livestream Q&A with Sky Hopinka together with Jacqueline Urla and Laura McGough, which will take place Wednesday, March 9 at 7:30pm on Facebook and YouTube.

Małni – Towards the ocean, Towards the Shore the debut feature film by Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga) follows Sweetwater Sahme and Jordan Mercier as they wander through nature and the spirit world, contemplating their afterlife, rebirth, and death. Spoken mostly in chinuk wawa, this experimental documentary offers a poetic inquiry into the death myth of the Chinookan people in the Pacific Northwest. Hopinka’s signature lush visual imagery and captivating sound design combine to create a portrait of the natural world and its cycles of life and death. (2020, Sky Hopinka, USA, 82 min, in English and Chinuk Wawa w/ English subtitles)

Click here to watch the film.

Click either platform to livestream the Q&A: Facebook or YouTube.

hands holding film

We See as We Made: 16MM Films from France and Not

Catherine Bauer and Loic Verdiillon of MTK Grenoble Film Archive

L’Atelier MTK is an artisan cinematographic laboratory  founded in 1992 by an group of filmmakers.  It is equipped to work with 16mm black and white and color film stock, offering both an introduction to and an education in lab techniques in order to provide filmmakers with the necessary independence to make their own films. The lab should be considered like a playground – like a phase with creative potential, to be questioned at will, without any previously established preoccupations.

In the Keefe Campus Theater at 7:00 pm on Monday the 21st (President's Day), Cat and Loic will  demonstrate and discuss the intricacies of 16 MM film.

film clacker held between two hands against desert background with blue sky

Five College Student Film and Video Festival

Student films in competition

Founded in 1994, the Five College Student Film and Video Festival is an annual event featuring original films and videos by Five College students. Sponsored by the Five College Film Council and evaluated by a jury of students and faculty members from each campus, the festival annually features selected works and gives out awards. Amherst College's own Grace Cates and Anniyah Rawlins will be on the 2022 Judges' Panel!

The festival will be held virtually on the weekend of March 26th and 27th. 

Visit the Five College Film Festival Web Page for more information

If you have any questions please feel free to email 5collegefilmfestival@gmail.com or contact the Student Director Amparo Saubidet at asaubidet@smith.edu

blue, yellow, and black poster advertising film and media conference

Five College Film and Media Studies Undergraduate Conference

virtual event

The 5C Film and Media Studies Undergraduate Conference is designed to build community among students studying film and media on each of the five campuses, to give our most engaged students an opportunity to hone their presentation skills, and to allow them to  share insights from their work with a wider audience. Participants will each give a 15-minute  presentation as part of a panel with 2-3 fellow students working on related themes. Coordinated in 2022 by Professors Josh Guilford of Amherst College and Jen Malkowski of Smith College. 

A link to program and registration can be found here: program

A link to registration can be found here: registration

Film reels

FAMS Open House and Senior Capstone Symposium 2022 *Virtual*

Come celebrate the creative and critical work of our amazing senior FAMS majors!

Friday, March 4th, from 11AM-3:15PM on Zoom. Each of the nine graduating seniors in Film and Media Studies will present fifteen-minute talks showcasing their films and research.

The FAMS Program presents three panel presentations showcasing the creative and critical work of FAMS Seniors. Friends, family, majors, premajors: all are welcome! FAMS majors: we hope you will come support our graduating seniors! Prospective majors: we invite you to stay after to chat with FAMS professors and current majors about the program, major & events.

A program of panels and speakers can be found: here.

The zoom link to attend the event can be found: here.

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